Reloading Automation

On 4/5/2013 7:00 PM, J.B.Slocomb wrote:


Might try some of those. But mostly target plinking and whatnot...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Thats a very good setup. Any questions you have about reloading..call me
805-732.........5308
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Lee is ok for starter gear..but it wont hold up to thousands of rounds of ammo
https://picasaweb.google.com/104042282269066802602/HomeShop?authkey=Gv1sRgCMeUu5PErfKiRA#5773371299310252690
https://picasaweb.google.com/104042282269066802602/HomeShop?authkey=Gv1sRgCMeUu5PErfKiRA#5773371365499398354
https://picasaweb.google.com/104042282269066802602/HomeShop?authkey=Gv1sRgCMeUu5PErfKiRA#5773371425750267234
Cast steel...RCBS, Lyman, Pacific etc etc are what will hold up over a couple million rounds
Gunner
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tuesday I received my Lee LoadMaster progressive press for .223 Remington. Adjusted and tested, weighed several powder charges, etc. I reloaded a few cartridges last night and ran a small batch tonight, now I have 126 reloaded cartridges plus 80 purchased. The 126 was the number of brass I had ready to reload...
Some of my brass has crimped primers, I need to ream or swage them to the correct shape. I have some other brass that has the Berdan <sp> primers. I saw some info on the internet about drilling Berdan primers out to accept regular primers.
Potential for further automation includes an escapement for case feeding and a bullet feeder.
RogerN
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RogerN wrote:

Good luck with that. Berdan primed cases get sold as scrap by me. Just not worth the time and effort to do all the work to convert them. It's FAR more work than just drilling them out.

--
Steve W.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 6 Apr 2013 01:30:52 -0500

<snip>
You should try running some of your reloads through your semi-auto before going any farther. Story...
Years ago when I was ambitious I loaded up some .223 ammo with a recommended recipe. They didn't work so well in a Mini-14. You would get off one shot and then a jam. What was happening was the shell was being extracted while the powder was still burning, leaving powder debris in the chamber. The next shell would jam in this debris. I'm sure that same recipe would work okay in anything but an auto-loader but I learned this the hard way...
Auto-loaders can be pretty picky on what you feed them :(
Watch your crimps too, auto-loaders really man-handle their ammo...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Id STRONGLY suggest you do NOT drill berdan primers and attempt to reform them unless its a "last resort". There are some issues that can cause a weapon to frankly..blow up ...when doing this.
I you need .223 brass...its available on the net cheap enough (still) or I could send you several hundred.
As for crimped primer pockets..there are two methods that work well enough. The first is simply using a case mouth deburring tool and with a turn or 3..cut off the burrs. The best way..is to buy a RCBS/hornady/wlson etc "primer pocket swage" and use that.
Or make your own out of 7/8-14 all thread and machine one as an exercise.
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/235832/rcbs-primer-pocket-swager-combo-2
http://www.midwayusa.com/product/501588/hornady-primer-pocket-reamer-tool-small
etc etc
Ive used the reamers on drill press..and have used industrial cutting tools with better results on the drill press.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only thing I've ever reloaded was shotgun shells, and that wasn't for the cost, but because we were loading special flare inserts for the Forestry Service.
But based upon what I've seen of progressive loading equipment, they don't look too conducive to being extensively modified and automated.
Personally, I think it would be better to use commercial dies, and build an automatic press from the ground up.
I have built two machines almost exactly like that for making pyrotechnic gerbs (fountains). They feed "cartridges" (paper tubes) from bulk, size- check each one, orient the mouths the correct way, place empty tubes for loading, measure powder to within 0.15 grain, pour it in multiple increments into the tubes, consolidate each increment, check the final powder height, seal the tubes, eject the finished product from the loader, and store the loaded tubes in containers.
I do not think I could have adapted manual loaders to do that... they didn't build them with accommodating all the necessary "satellite" mechanisms in mind.
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/27/2013 8:45 PM, RogerN wrote:

NOTHING is available on line, of course. But there is ammo in the gun shops. At least there was 30.30 every store I checked today. Not a lot, but everybody had cartridges on the shelf. So I bought 100 rounds (5 boxes) of 30.30 today for $20 a box. That's about 2x what it was 30 years ago.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Dillon is the gold standard of progressive reloading units.
I'd suggest the 650 with a case feeder. You still pull the handle and place the bullet. It easily runs at 30 rounds a minute once you're all set up. No problem running 2K rounds after supper. Changeover to another caliber is significant. For quicker changeovers and smaller runs go to the 550 press - no case feeder, no auto rotation, less stations.
if you want to REALLY crank them out, go to the 1050 press. This is the one to use if you'd like to add a servo motor to run the crank and sensors, PLC etc. then sit back and watch it run. other folks have done this if you'd care to investigate. A fair bit of coin here, way to much IMHO.
My son runs a 650 and does our 9mm, .223, and .308. I have a 550 and do .50AE, .270, .3030, .45 ; need more dies for other calibers.
I'm watching for a .50 BMG press. Prices and availablity nuts right now, I'm waiting a bit for bama scare #2 to subside.
karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/28/2013 2:12 AM, Karl Townsend wrote:

Cool... <http://www.dillonprecision.com/content/p/9/catid/1/pid/25792/BL_550_Basic_Loader I guess it is assumed that you know what you are doing when you start shopping for tools.
But there is a bit more involved, isn't there, Karl? Getting all the adapters for a certain round in the forst place.
Resizing brass, and for rim headspaced brass for tube magazines, I see that crimping (and doing it right!) is important. <http://www.sportsmanswarehouse.com/sportsmans/Lee-Crimp-Die/productDetail/Rifle-Dies/prod9999002251/cat100147
Also, a personal question, how do you keep track of how many times a case has been reloaded?
Take it from the perspective of an interested party who has no experience at all with the subject...
Obviously it's an equipment sport, but Where to start?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I loaded brass mostly target loads for pistol bulls eye shooting and used to measure the case length only. Never annealed or kept track of loading. I did re-load some 44 magnum stuff for a couple of Mdl. 92's that I had converted from 44-40 but in those days long guns were generally used for hunting so likely most of the brass was once fired stuff.
You mention "cowboy shooting". Do you use cast bullets for that. If so then you also need to get into bullet making, the various alloys, hardening cast lead bullets, and, and, and.
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/28/2013 6:24 AM, J.B.Slocomb wrote:

I think not. At least for now. I think the wise course of action would be to get started reloading in simpler steps.
BTW, I have a bunch of reloads from my late father-in-law's collection. Two of them today failed to go into full battery. Close - but no cigar. The Winchester 94 won't release the firing pin if the lever is not all the way up. That last silly millimeter is SO important.
I haven't mikes those two rounds yet. But I will tonight.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If a 30-30 round won't chamber there is really something wrong. the head space is taken on the rim so if the case won't fully chamber the shoulder is rather far forward.... or the bullet is protruding a lot more then it should.
What I would do if competition shooting with a rimmed cartridge and used brass would be to full length resize all the brass, at least the first time, and make up a dummy cartridge as a master for how deep to seat the bullet, unless of course you always use the same bullet.
With a tubular magazine you also need to decide how heavy a crimp you need to keep the things together :-)
Generally speaking, unless you are going for the last FPS you can squeeze out you aren't going to have a lot of case problems... I am assuming that you are not trying for the last possible foot per second in muzzle velocity for cowboy shooting ... and if you were to load a 30-30 to its original specifications you probably will never need to worry about the cases.
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2013 7:03 AM, J.B.Slocomb wrote:

I hear that.
For what it's worth, this ammo came from my late father-in-law's collection.
I went through all of that last night. Factory loads (Winchester and Remington) were exactly 50 mm long. Some of the handloads were 1 to 1.5 mm longer. So maybe...
But the real difference, and I'm guessing the reason these rounds (six of then) wouldn't load is that the necks were bigger; fatter. 4 or 5 thousanths? Could that make such a difference?
I need to go back to school reading inch micrometers. My large frame ones are all metric, but he small ones are inch. I confuse easily these days...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You need to determine the design sizes for your ammo - in the case of 30-30 it is 2.0395 long (51.80 mm) but in addition you need to have the shoulder in the right place - it starts 1.4405 from the base - but this is hard to measure so most people initially full length resize the case. than when fired the case expands (fire forms) to fit your chamber and from then on you just measure the length of the case and trim if necessary.
Generally speaking you can figure that any factory chamber will be safe with any "standard" cartridge case.
AS for mixed measuring instruments, it can be a problem. I recently had the use of a fellow's shop in Singapore for a week. His lathe and milling machine were both metric and his measuring tools were imperial :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/29/2013 7:37 PM, J.B.Slocomb wrote:

thank you, sir. that made sense...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Richard wrote:

Assuming you aren't tumbling the brass, a sharpie mark on the head next to the primer each time you reload it works fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

don't go with the basic, get the 550 package. then you're all set for one caliber. it comes with a great HOW TO video.
You'll end up buying a bunch of other stuff. The need for better toys never ends. But the basic 550 unit will still be in great shape for your grandchildren.
Karl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For low pressure rounds like .45 ACP, you'll lose them before they become unable to be reloaded. Guys use them until the headstamps are pounded off and beyond. For rifle rounds, part of the process is checking for cracks and incipient head separations, you just don't dump high-pressure loads into rifle brass without inspecting the empties first. I never keep track of how many times something's been reloaded. If a case is within length specs, the neck's not too thick and there are no cracks or stretch marks, it's loaded.
Progressives can load a lot of ammo fast. They can also load a lot of bad and/or dangerous ammo fast as well. Too many folks think that they just load up hoppers, pump the lever and ammo automagically appears. It still takes a lot of process control, maybe more, since you aren't handling the pieces with every round loaded. Can lead to damaged guns and/or shooters.
As far as where to start, read a book FIRST. ABCs of Reloading is one place, up to 9th or 10th edition, all that changes that I can see is the pictures of equipment from edition to edition. Most libraries I've been in have a copy. Then start out with a single station press. Right now is kind of tough to get started, primers are in short supply as is new brass.
Stan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.