Roaster got a new gas jet

On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 22:14:17 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm,


Rightio!
I astonish people when I make coffee. I put water in the top, put in a drip paper in the filter cone and add the right amount of ground coffee, and then I add a cup of milk to the bottom of the urn before I turn the Mr. Coffee on. Sweetener is added afterward to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the urn. I've figured out how much water, coffee, and sweetener it takes to make a pot and that keeps every cup at the same sweetness and strength. Since I can't drink as much coffee as I used to, I like it all good. It's good iced, too.

To me, it's either excellent coffee or "it's just Folgers."

Yeah, I daresay it wasn't a favorite of mine, and I usually -like- the Colombian coffees. The Millstone Sumatra Mandheling I got the other day is somewhat bitter. Darn!

195ish is what the thermometer says.

<g>
Yeah, here, too. Mine's a 6hp (peak, on steroids with some Octane 104 in the tank, maybe.)

I saw those listed the other day and wondered WTF that was. More Searz horsies, eh?

...but gasoline not on the table.

Isn't EVERYTHING?

It's a bassackwards tiller. I much prefer the rear tine unless it's a Mantis. Those little beasties are wonderful. My neighbor has one.

When it comes to Searz, JUST SAY NO!
- Metaphors Be With You -
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Oh, hell yes, love my Mantis. For such a light machine it digs like it means it. Even cuts through sod, which for any tiller can be a bit of a problem.

If it ain't (the right) green, you won't find it in my shed.
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2007 22:14:17 -0400, Steve Ackman wrote:
Ok, following up to myself, before someone else jumps on it...

Ok... so 8.25 lb-ft times 2(pi) means 51.8 ft-lbs of work done each rev., times 3600 rpm = 186480 ft-lbs/min. or ~5.6 hp. That sounds better. Now why didn't B&S just say so to begin with.
(assuming 3600 rpm... doncha just hate it when you have to do that?)
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16:49:06 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

For comparison with your own impressions, the importer's notes:
    Taste profile:     Aroma: Very Intense     Acidity: High - Pronounced Brightness     Body: Dense, round     Flavor: Berries, Caramel, Very Sweet     Aftertaste: Very pleasant     Screen size: 18/19
Nah, I never agree 100% with 'em either. ;-)
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On Tue, 5 Jun 2007 21:26:50 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Steve

Ah, had I gone to the root dir, I'd have seen that you aren't commercial yet for roasted beans. Let me know when you are, please. I'm having trouble finding a nice dark roast which isn't also bitter. The Sumatran beans brewed very close to the perfect cup for me but I haven't tried them since the tsunamis.
I recently read _The Devil's Cup_, the hilarious journey of a coffee afficionado to find the truth about the history of the bean. It was a fun read. Pain (any pain--emotional, physical, mental) has a message. The information it has about our life can be remarkably specific, but it usually falls into one of two categories: "We would be more alive if we did more of this," and, "Life would be more lovely if we did less of that." Once we get the pain's message, and follow its advice, the pain goes away. -- Peter McWilliams, Life 101
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Larry,
It is not difficult to roast your own beans. Common DIY techniques are using a heat gun and a dog bowl and stirring with a wooden spoon, others have had great success with Popcorn poppers picked up at a thrift store for about $5.
I use a salvaged gas bar-b-que grill that I made a stainless drum that I can roast up to 5lbs at a time.
Doing it yourself lets you get coffee at it's peek of flavor. Of course once you start down this road, you tend to find most commercial offerings to be stale and of poor quality by comparison.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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On Wed, 6 Jun 2007 13:55:52 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,

I may have to do that after all. Those bastids at COSTCO didn't have half the items I wanted today, including NO SUMATRAN BEANS! <grrrrrrr>
- Metaphors Be With You -
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14:53:49 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

If you haven't already seen it, "Why Roast your own?" and links to using a popcorn popper: http://twoloonscoffee.com/why_roast.html
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On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 17:19:29 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Steve

Thanks. How long do the green cherries survive in captivity?

That thar's a high-falutin' roaster, sir.
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16:40:48 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

Green beans have been said to last anywhere from "indefinitely" to "about a year." It depends mostly on the mostly on storage conditions, and some greens "age gracefully" while others just sort of lose their liveliness. Not so far as bland, but tending in that direction.

That's the field expedient 5 minute roaster. ;-) Well... maybe 10 minutes if you haven't done it before.
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-0700, Roger Shoaf wrote:

I even roasted in a cast iron frying pan for several days. It was very labor intensive, but the coffee was quite good... of course, just about any coffee is "quite good" when it's drunk outside a cabin on a lake with birds chirping, the sun shining, and a cool breeze blowing. ;-)
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06:45:24 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

It's more a matter of not doing much retail due to a variety of reasons mostly having to do with ensuring freshness.

Sure thing.

Dark roasts mute the varietal characteristics that differentiate one bean from another. (Then again, dark roasts also help cover up faults.) In order to stand up to a dark roast, a bean's got to be really dense. I haven't really seen many Sumatrans that do well past a Vienna roast. IMO, taking most of them to French Roast is past their sweet spot.

It's been mentioned on alt.coffee several times. One of these days I'll get around to it. Hey, I've got a copy of "The Perfect Cup" by Tim Castle that wouldn't mind being traded for it. ;-)
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On Wed, 6 Jun 2007 21:09:06 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Steve

I wish I had some Seattle's Best for you to try. Hmm, on their website, it says "light to medium roast" for the whole bean Sumatrans. Maybe it was Seattle Mountain Grown coffee, but I thought it was a dark roast. It was a very dark looking bean, that's for sure, and at $9.50 for 3 pounds (when I first started buying it, now $13), it was a great value.
I wonder if I could rig up a roaster from an HF weed burner... I almost bought one today. <chortle>

Sorry, it was a loaner from the library.
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19:32:24 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

In a word... yes. ;-)
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Steve Ackman wrote:

You would probably love to drive into Utrecht in Holland by one of the main southern access roads, Douwe Egbert have a roasting plant there and you can smell it for a mile or more when downwind, you don't need to drink it, it's a stimulating smell.
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Unless you are down wind while they are roasting. The smoke that comes off during roasting is similar to somebody burning a pile of half dry grass (as in lawn grass). It only smells wonderful after the coffee is roasted.
--

__
Roger Shoaf

Important factors in selecting a mate:
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-0700, Roger Shoaf wrote:

It smells pretty good to me at just about any stage of the roast... but the aromas of offgassing from about +1 hr to about +48 hrs post roast just can't be beat. Nothing in the world smells better than that!
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RCM only
On Thu, 7 Jun 2007 16:48:46 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Steve

If that unexpected notice from USPS is any indication, I'll soon know. Thankee, Sir. As of 6am this morning, I'm looking for a surplus air popcorn popper, too.
--
A book burrows into your life in a very profound way
because the experience of reading is not passive.
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16:35:32 -0700, Larry Jaques wrote:

Hmmm.. Unexpected to me too. I didn't think that was supposed to happen. (too accustomed to FedEx, I guess)
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23:11:47 +0100, David Billington wrote:

I was there in '79 (the outskirts, anyway). Don't recall any coffee smells at that time. ;-)
Maxwell House used to have a roastery practically downtown in Jacksonville, FL. Even roasting coffee that horrid smelled good to me, but apparently not to anyone else. They closed it down several years ago, IIRC, due to complaints about the smell.
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