Round metal stock (for lathe owners)

So, where do people buy round metal stock for turning? I have a few odds and ends at home, but not much. As always, I do not want to spend a fortune.

i
Reply to
Ignoramus18353
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I often use Online Metals and am generally happy with them.

Peter

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Reply to
Peter Grey

I get 90% of my non-steel stock from Kirschbaum & Krupp, a local non-ferrous metal recycler. Not convenient for you, but the concept may be valid. I'd look for similar outlets where you live. It's not reliable, but I find treasures there for pennies compared to retail.

Ignoramus18353 said the following on 5/12/2005 3:09 PM:

Reply to
John Hofstad-Parkhill

Think about it. If you are going to spend say 20 hours machining something, how much is it worth? If you value your time at all, the material cost will be just about negligible compared to the machining time. It is worth it to get the optimum material in many cases. I've made lots of bushings from pipe because I was lazy, but if they had to be very precise, I would go buy 12L14 or bronze or something.

The place to buy lathe stock is from the cutoffs rack of your local steel vendor. In the Seattle area, you could go to Summerville Steel in Kent, Washington. If you posted your location, maybe someone knows of a local source. Else you're stuck paying shipping which will kill you.

GWE

Reply to
Grant Erwin

I just discovered auto axles - interesting stuff to machine. Seems hard on the outside, for about 1/8 inch deep, probably due to oil quenching when hot? Gives the tool a workout! Below that it's easier to turn, more like mild steel.

Reply to
Jordan

Don't overlook eBay. Look for "bar stock" (in quotes) there are lots of folks selling bar ends from a few inches to a foot or more in length at very reasonable prices.

I built up a pretty good "hell box" of aluminum and brass rounds that way. Some of the sellers pack them into those USPS cardboard envelopes which let you mail "Anything you can fit inside them." for a flat rate, even though the weight may be pretty high.

HTH,

Jeff

Reply to
Jeff Wisnia

My local scrap metal dealer often has round shapes for $.20/lb. Of course, they're of unknown composition, but usually they machine better than mild steel.

Gary Brady Austin, TX

Reply to
Gary Brady

I got to steel suppliers that also do custom cutting. They have a box of odds and ends and short bars 2 to 3' long. Last time I bought some it was 25 cents a pound and it's been a while since I have bought any. What's nice is they often still have the paint on 1 end so you know just what you are buying. Just keep throwing pieces on the scale until your pocket book can't handle any more.

Richard W.

Reply to
Richard W.

I get small qtys of 4150 CM from my friendly neighborhood gunbarrel maker. Occasionally get some stainless, too.

-jc-

Reply to
John Chase

Funny. I just replied privately to Gary with this exact same question. Up until about 5 minutes ago I wasn't sure there was anyone else in Austin that did metalwork. Now I know there are at least 3 of us... Cool.

Robert

Reply to
Siggy

HeHe. Too much music and computers around Austin for any interest in metal(working). We're a rare and strange breed around here. Maybe we need to have a meeting or two. I'll sponsor a metalcasting session.

Gary

Reply to
Gary Brady

I go to Commercial Metals on Industrial Blvd, just south of Ben White. They have a section of used stuff, a lot of tubes, angles, plates, etc that you can scrounge in. Price was $.20/# last time I was there (4-5 months ago). There is another yard affiliated with Commercial Metals on Howard Lane. Look in the Yellow Pages and their address will be listed along with CM. There's also Austn Pipe and Supply on 4th and I35 (approx). Kind of a junky place though, and not as well sorted as CM.

Gary

Reply to
Gary Brady

Thank you gentlemen. I get the picture. I will keep an eye on ebay as well as scrap yarda and local metalworking places.

Reply to
Ignoramus18353

good idea, thank you.

that's highly unadvisable, these envelopes are not strong enough. I got burned on that once.

i
Reply to
Ignoramus18353

| I got to steel suppliers that also do custom cutting. They have a box of | odds and ends and short bars 2 to 3' long. Last time I bought some it was

25 | cents a pound and it's been a while since I have bought any. What's nice is | they often still have the paint on 1 end so you know just what you are | buying. Just keep throwing pieces on the scale until your pocket book can't | handle any more. | | Richard W.

Which reminds me... How do I learn what colors mean what? Is there a link I can stash away (to remember that I don't have when I'm at the yard?)

Reply to
carl mciver

Sadly, the color coding system of metals is not industry wide. Unless you have the coding system from each particular mill and know from which mill the material comes, you'll still be in the dark.

Harold

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Reply to
Harold and Susan Vordos

A hint for those who buy or scrounge drops.. buy one of those Dychem paint pens for $3, and when picking out the painted drops, refer to the dealers color code chart, and mark the material type on the drop. Takes just a second.

Color codes are NOT universal and Acme Steel will use a different color code from Neighborhood Steel.

What may be 303 and marked Pink in one place, may be CRS in another.

I get my bar ends etc directly from the machine shops while doing service work, and always ask what the material really is, then mark it before tossing it in the truck. Even a permanent marker will work.

Gunner

"Veterans, and anyone sensible, take cover when there's incoming. A cloud of testosterone makes a piss poor flack shield."

Reply to
Gunner

I didn't say it was ME who mailed them that way.

But, the sellers did tape the stock together and then the envelopes (like mummys) with clear packaging tape. I think it would have taken a nuclear weapon or concerted effort to tear the cardboard enough to let the stock get separated from the address in transit.

Reminds me of my halcion days when I got really pissed off at those damn loose "shot in" postpaid reply cards falling out of a magazine so I had to bend down to pick it off the floor when my hands were already full.

I taped a few of them onto bricks and dropped them in mailboxes.

That was before the Feds made it illegal to maliciously return those kind of cards 'yknow. Now, if you just cram everything in a junk mailing into its postpaid reply envelope and mail it you could be in trouble with the eagle if they somehow cought up with you.

Jeff

Reply to
Jeff Wisnia

A USPS clerk told me that I am not allowed to put tape over those envelopes. (!)

USPS has so many of those stupid unknown rules etc, that I try to use them as little as possible. I never know what is going to bite me next time and get my package returned.

I did not know that it was illegal.... So, if Iwrite FUCK YOU on such a card, and mail it back, I am doing something illegal?

i
Reply to
Ignoramus633

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