ROV in a bucket


Maybe someone who has played with underwater robots knows about these
things. Any RCMer should be able to make one in an afternoon. If you do,
please let us know how it works out. It looks like a great toy:
formatting link

Reply to
Ed Huntress
Loading thread data ...
That is a neat link. The under water camera reminded me of a day when the terminal for our AB 8400B controlled water jet lost the crt. The only place I could find something to use in a pinch was at Sam's club. Monitor came with a BW security camera.
Anyway, once I managed to get the terminal repaired, the security monitor was 'borrowed' by a couple guys in our die repair (steel rule dies) shop. They made a waterproof enclosure with lighting to see what was down hole while icefishing. I don't think it worked out all that great but they didn't kill the camera.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Isn't it? Those are your tax dollars at work. The link I provided is part of the NOAA project to restore the iron warship Monitor:
formatting link
There's a good description of the chemistry of steel corrosion in a marine environment, too, along with some discussion about how they removed the corrosion for the restoration project. (It's the "Iron Cheesbox" link.) It will be familiar to some RCMers, but electrolytic rust removal that takes over 200 days in the tank may be a surprise for some (I've heard of ancient marine artifacts requiring up to 3 years in the tank)
A fish finder was the first thing I thought of. I could chase those big trout in a nearby reservoir...
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Somehow I didn't mind seeing those bucks getting spent on this one.
Wow, that is a long time but I was more impressed by underwater flush toilets. How is it that that bit of technology never hit the text books?
Uncle has done the electrolyic derusting thing with a few items he dragged home. I was pretty impressed with the results on a post drill.
I wonder how much of the technology of the day used in making that ship has been lost over the years?
Will your ROV have a ROS (Remote Operated Spear ) ;)
Wes
Reply to
Wes
Not being an engineer with a practical bent, I can hardly guess. d8-)
I use it frequently, particularly the brush method that's described in the drop-box archives. I use the full formula that's recommended there, including the waterglass (sodium silicate). It's probably overkill but it works great. BTW, my electrode is a slab of Poco 3 graphite I sawed off of an old EDM electrode, around 8 x 1 x 3/4 inch. It, too, works great.
Good question. There's a lot of information available on the Monitor now. They also found a jar of pickle relish on board, which they said smelled really good 150 years later. But it was full of lead from the pickling process they used then so nobody tried it.
Hey, good thinking! A one-handed CO2-powered speargun probably could be rigged into that thing very nicely...
Reply to
Ed Huntress
It looks like a great robotic project for the kids. Beats playing video games.
You might like the RC submarines in the tank at Cabin Fever. All you would have to do is sling a CO2 speargun under one and do some trout research.
As a materials guy, the floats used on the Nereus may interest you.
formatting link
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Under? I was thinking center of mass but then there is a concern that the hydrodynamics (drag) of all the structures might cause some unexpected deflection of the spear during the recoil phase.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
Hmm. It sounds like a long reach for a float, but I can see where most ordinary materials have a problem at 16,000 psi.
Interesting link, Kevin.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
The thought was not to modify the submarine. For the spear, compressed air contained in the shaft of the spear might work best.
Or you might call Dave Barrett and see what it would take to add a toothed opening to one of these:
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
I didn't see anything that could pressurize the innards.
PVC pipe and connections?
It's a swimming pool toy on a short leash.
I did some programming work for Perry Oceanographic way back in once-upon-a-time time. It was fun work.
Reply to
cavelamb
Why would you pressurize the innards?
It's better than no swimming pool toy.
And it looks like a fun thing. I can think of several places to use one. But...I have enough hobbies.
Rutgers has some neat underwater devices. I especially like this one, which is especially clever:
formatting link
It completed a trans-Atlantic crossing last month, operating autonomously. That's some fuel efficiency:
formatting link
Reply to
Ed Huntress
YOU need a boat.
Get out ans sail some.
Reply to
cavelamb
Look up the weather in New Jersey right now. I don't sail on hard water anymore.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
The high school kids back in Washington State built some ROV's with a longer leash. As I remember they had a 100 ' leash. We changed from the control system shown here. Instead we ran a reasonably stout power and return, and then used Mosfets in the ROV to control the motors. The wires from the control box were something like 22 gauge. Would have been better to use a microprocessor with a serial i/o, but that was beyond where the students level of competence. The kids did understand why running power to each individual motor was not a good idea for long leads.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Winter time is for CLEANING. You know that...
Reply to
cavelamb
Don! That's fabulous. Kids are sometimes surprising little creatures, aren't they.
Reply to
cavelamb
formatting link
As concerns the the AUV, Rutgers bought it from Webb Research (you can have one too). No development there.
Here is an article with a little bit of technical information:
formatting link
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
Does anyone know what ever became of Glenn, and his boat project?
formatting link
updated six years ago.
Reply to
Half-Nutz

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.