securing lead metal to wood with methacrylate adhesive?

I have a project that requires securing lead to plywood. Would a
methacrylate adhesive be suitable for this? Thank you.
Reply to
John Sony
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Dynamic or static loading?
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Static.
Reply to
John Sony
John Sony fired this volley in news:kh0ate$85e$1 @dont-email.me:
Hardly matters. Lead has very high lubricity and is also soft enough that any adhesive strong enough to stick can also simply pull molecules of the lead loose as the bond tears. RADICALLY roughing up the surface can help a lot, but not much sticks forever to lead.
Regardless of what substance you use to seal the gaps, you need mechanical fasteners to properly affix lead to a surface, if you have moderate to high loads on the joint.
One reasonable exception is that pressure-sensitive adhesives, along with cushioned backing between the lead and joint (double-stick foam tape), result in relatively strong joints for very low-load apps.
It's strong enough to affix wheel weights -- but keep in mind that the largest part of their working load is exerted against the flanged rim of the wheel, and the tape is just keeping everything in place against the flange.
Painting lead carries much of the same difficulties.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I have no idea how cyanoacrylate does, and that varies a LOT with the formulation, anyway.
I can testify that Elmer's two-tube epoxy holds quite well. I've epoxied lead keels into surf-fishing plugs and they've held up for years. The lead is almost trapped by the epoxy, though, so it may just be potting it, rather than adhering.
In any case, as you say, lead oxide is very weak and you have to "scratch in" the epoxy, wet, to get a good physical bond. I don't know about the chemical bond.
Reply to
Ed Huntress
Wouldn't think so. Metal to wood needs a little give in the adhesive. Wood moves, metal doesn't. Try some of the construction cements that come in a caulking tube or silicone adhesive. If it's like lead sheet covering a roof vent or the like, lead-head nails are the way.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
As usual, I recommend Goop for dissimilar material bonding.
Pick a flavor.
For this, probably plumbers Goop since it's a lot less viscous that the others. That would help make a uniform film thickness.
Reply to
Richard
I doubt it. There are usually very different expansion rates between metals and woods. I think I'd try using a sturdy lead alloy (antimony is a common additive) for the shield and holding it onto the wood with screws, John.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
If you are putting thin sheets on plywood as sheilding, I wuld use Super 77 spray adhedive.
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Reply to
Randy
Ayup..couldnt be pure lead..its like taffy with a hard on. Wheelweights would be a good ally to start with, going up to printers alloys like linotype.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Good choice!
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Or "liquid nail"
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
3M's Type 5200 Marine adhesive/sealant would work fine. Comes in colors too.
Reply to
PCS
Yes. But much more expensive than Goop...
Reply to
Richard

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