Self-Reproduction of a Universal Machine Tool

snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
...


EDM?
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On Aug 31, 1:52pm, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I thought of another one.
The mechanical part is two or more robot arms with the elbow upward like a backhoe. The wrist is a hollow rotating flange you attach tools or grabbers to.
Arms like this can be made from aluminum bar stock with brass tubing bearings.
There is one or more upright posts or blocks on the base that serves as the zero reference and a work support, so to cut off a bar one arm holds the bar against the posts while the other one saws it, pulling straight inward so flex doesn't change the cut line. This way it can saw out all its links, tubing and shafts.
It drills pivot holes with a Dremel and carbide ball cutter. First it roughs out the center of the hole, ignoring its positional errors, then it spirals out, taking lighter cuts to reduce deflection. Finally it asks you to ream the hole and insert a brass bushing that it cut from tubing.
Pivot shafts are held by snap rings. It saws their grooves by holding the shaft against the rest and rotating the wrist.
The actuators are water hydraulics. The cylinders are sawed fron tubing, the pistons and ends are carved from thin brass sheet, stacked and soldered. This gives the O ring grooves smooth sides. You also solder the closed end on to avoid threads. The mother contains the water pump and controls until you figure out how it can make its own power source..
The wrist could be driven by purchased bevel gears on shafts it cuts to length. It might be able to make a worm and a worm wheel with square threads.
Initially the position feedback could be fishline winding off spools with encoders. A later version could use sonar or optics controlled by the mother machine with only a reflector etc on the daughters.
Using rod and soldered brass tubing reduces the turning to a minimum. As far as possible the machining is only sawing stock to length and drilling relatively rough holes. The mother machine learns to compensate for play in the joints somewhat but the big help is resting the work against a stop and using partially self-guiding cutters such as saw blades.
You buy all the small hardware and standard metal shapes, and you assemble the parts after it makes them. Assume that wire and all electronics are too complicated to make and buy them.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Sure.
--
Curt Welch http://CurtWelch.Com /
snipped-for-privacy@kcwc.com http://NewsReader.Com /
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On Thu, 28 Aug 2008 06:19:15 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In that case, the Hommel, or something like that, might interest you. The way I figure it, the Hommel can make replicas of each part of itself except the castings, which are cast, not machined, but some slight design changes could allow you to use milled steel parts instead of the castings. Also, the bed of the Hommel is too big to be conveniently milled on the bed of the Hommel, at least it looks that way to me. But if you have TWO Hommels, you might somehow stick their beds together end-to-end to allow bigger work.
Here's a link to the Hommel:
http://www.lathes.co.uk/hommel/
Next, a page in German. Many pictures, and some dude shows a Hommel converted to CNC:
http://www.enhydralutris.de/Hommel/index.html
Another very good page, but it seems to be broken at the moment:
http://www.uwg-hommel.de /
Perhaps this is not exactly what you're looking for, but I hope it might at least provide some inspiration. It's a lovely machine.
Best wishes, S.
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wrote:

.... Yes, I asked the site's adminitrator, Tony Griffiths, to separate out the universal machines with a header "Combination Machines", at http://www.lathes.co.uk/index.html, and the Hommel is listed there, abou t75% into the page as you scroll down. It is a candidate for self- reproduction, and so are all the other universal machines listed there. I gaze at those photos for hours thinking of configuring the subject machine to make a part of itself. Ideally, I'd have a zillion dollars and one of each of those universal machines to evaluate. Practically, I have the Super Shop only, and Autocad Inventor LT 2009, the demo edition. Big gap. :)
Doug
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