Shaded pole motors


Buddy at work has a blower motor for his pellet stove that has given up the
ghost. A call
around finds the blower is OEM only at $312.00 or so.
This buys the motor, housing and fan. He just needs a motor. Grainger had
something
close he is going to try to make work but just in case that fails, anyone know
other good
sources for shaded pole motors in qty one?
Wes
Reply to
Wes
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anyone know other good
Try Herbach and Rademan Look at both motors and fans/blowers.
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Dan
Reply to
dcaster
Home Depot, lowes, home supply. Most any bathroom fan motor is a shaded pole motor.
Reply to
Bill McKee
he ghost. =A0A call
er had something
know other good
Are these the German made blowers/motors like we had on an old pellet stove?
Paul
Reply to
co_farmer
Hmmm... seems like I remember McMaster Carr having pages of them, but I just looked and didn't find any. How bout that.
However, if you just plug "shaded pole motor" (both with and without quotes), you'll get a lot of returns.
Good hunting!
Erik
Reply to
Erik
Why can it not be repaired? Very few electric motors cannot be repaired and unless the windings are burnt, the repair is both cheaper and faster.This is especially true if you must adapt the drive end as well as the mount. Steve
ghost. A call
other good
Reply to
Steve Lusardi
Wes wrote in news:8cCUm.393833$ snipped-for-privacy@en-nntp-05.dc.easynews.com:
Maybe post here with make and model of stove and blower motor and see what suggestions come:
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cross reference and source may have been identified by some other stove owner. North of the 49th we have
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from motor shops and appliance repair places like Reliable Parts. Most blower motors can be substituted with a similar RPM and amperage rating in a standard frame motor if the OEM didn't use a custom shaft. Fasco should have something, odds are they probably made the original
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tried a web search for a couple random stock Fasco number and came up with hits available though Amazon.
Reply to
Charles U Farley
I've gotten motors at Johnstone Supply, not sure if they are nationwide.
Many times, motors just dry up. The draft inducer motor dried up, on a friend's furnace. She lives alone, unemployed, and has major medical problems. I was able to disassemble the motor. Sand the shaft lightly with some emery cloth. Remove the dried oil with Qtip and some WD-40. Reoil it with Zoom Spout Turbine oil (you may substitute two stroke mixer oil, if you wish). Reassemble, and it works fine.
Please try that, before spending $300.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I tried sending you a note directly but it bounced back - I have a nice, new, motor from a fan assembly, with power cord, and switch - listed on my web site at $20 - if it meets your friends needs that could save him some money
browse around
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in the forsale section - it's there somewhere (under misc, I think) - or find my email on my web site and drop me a note and I'll send you the info directly

Reply to
Bill Noble
Second that. I recently disassembled the bathroom ventilators from two bathrooms. The shaded pole motors would run after they got started, but would not start running. The first one I just cleaned and lubricated which did not fix the problem. The second one I added a couple of very thin stainless washers to take the thrust. The motors mount with the shaft vertical. That fixed the starting problem, so I went back and did the same to the first motor.
The motors are reversible shaded pole motors. How could that be, you say. Well they are actually two shaded pole motors on one shaft. Energize one motor and it runs clockwise, energize the other winding and it runs counter clockwise.
=20 Dan
Reply to
dcaster
I had this same conversation with a mate about 20 minutes ago regarding PC fans with sleeve bearings, in my experience shaded pole motors may have sleeve bearings also or the ball bearings and need a bit of lubrication occasionally. In the case of the PC fans it seems to be a matter of removing the makers label, then removing a plastic circlip and O ring retaining the shaft, then pulling the rotor and shaft, cleaning it of gummed up lubricant, and cleaning the oilite bearing, adding a small amount of new quality lubricant, re-assembly, and it's good to go for a few more years.
Part of my 2 yearly PC health check that the fans are going round as they should do.
Reply to
David Billington
Actually, it's quite simple to design a shaded pole motor with two shading windings that can be switched for direction change. Just never seen it commercially.
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
"I gots t' know" - why would a bathroom ventilator be reversible? Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
The main coils also have shade coils. They are very high current shorts. When the pole is energized the shade absorbs energy from the pole. As the magnetic power is decreased the shade winding kicks. This starts the turn as two are employed to twist clockwise and two counter (or anti) clockwise. They are typically the heavy current copper wires. Martin [ who has a 4 pole DC motor :-) ]
snipped-for-privacy@krl.org wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Record players had them. Martin
Mark Rand wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Never taken apart a ceiling fan but have to wonder what kind of motors luck within same...
Reply to
David Lesher
A lot of shaded pole motors are tack welded or pressed, ie, you can't unscrew them to access the bearings and whatnot. Same thing with washing machine/dryer motors, although some of those you can rebuild due to their size (except for the epoxied ones, those are disposable).
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
On Sun, 13 Dec 2009 06:30:51 +0000 (UTC), the infamous David Lesher scrawled the following:
They're _electric_ David. I beleive they're called drafty pole motors with windy windings. Just thought you'd like to know.
P.S: Translation for the Canuckistanis and Poms: "draughty"
P.P.S: For those of you who still want to know more about the actual motors, Wikipedia has a good article discussing them briefly.
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;)
Reply to
Larry Jaques
The PC fans I've done, pull the plastic label and apply a drop or two of oil for electric motors. To dissemble and clean, that's extra service which will likely give you extra life.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I've had some luck, blasting them clean with brake cleaner, and then oil them up.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon

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