Oregon Update


What a week.
First the freeze, which got my pipes and left me waterless, but only
for 8 hours.
Then the HVAC system went crazy, slowly losing its effectiveness to
warm the house over the past 3 days, able to run only 30-45 seconds at
a time. It was 57F this morning when I got up, the temp supposed to be
69F. The tech got here at 9 tis morning and left at 9:45 with a grin
on my face. The moisture drain tube had frozen up. We broke up the 9'
long 3/4" diameter icicle and she started working again. Whew!
Oh, and speaking of getting screwed, did I tell you guys about the
64GB thumb drive I ordered from China? It came in today and it's a
Sony. Beautiful little thing. It's marked 64GB and shows that to the
operating system, but it only holds about 4 gigs. I'd shoot the
little commie bastid who sold it to me but he's all the way around the
world. Now to see if eBay or Paypal will refund my fees...
Reply to
Larry Jaques
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======= Some of the high capacity thumb drives are set up with a small partition that will show on your system when first plugged in and which has a program you need to run to access/show the big partition. The program I have is called launchU3. You can password protect the big partition using the program.
Unka George (George McDuffee) .............................. The past is a foreign country; they do things differently there. L. P. Hartley (1895-1972), British author. The Go-Between, Prologue (1953).
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
I hate that launch U-3 thing. All I want is storage space. Try reformatting the disk before you send it back. Plug it in, see the drive in windows explorer. Right click on the thumb drive, and select "format disk". That should destroy all the programming and crap you didn't want anyway.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Sorry to hear so much has gone wrong. Glad it was "only" a frozen drain. Now, slope the drain more steeply, and maybe some heater tape?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
A mere reformatting does not, as far as I know, partition a drive -- they would have had to drastically change the format program.
'course, I'm not up on windows utilities. You want whatever passes for a partition manager.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
His OS doesn't support that capacity in the form factor.
Reply to
John R. Carroll
We got the freeze here, but lucked out (knock on wood) on the frozen pipes.
What part of Oregon? I'm far enough away from Oregon City that I can have dead cars on my property, yet still far enough away from Estacada that my neighbors all have different last names*.
*
I'm gonna get into trouble for that some day.
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Bad Karma from a previous life of stomping baby bunnies. And, this is only the beginning! Work it all out now so that in the next life you will be a professional Bikini-Waxer!
Reply to
Buerste
Huh. I knew those were usually formatted as FAT16, but I thought it was just tradition. So Windows doesn't support formatting a thumb drive as anything other than FAT16?
Reply to
Tim Wescott
Depends on the version and the OS in my experience. His drive has a BIOS. I've got a USB 2 external and an IDE internal drive here that 200 Pro will only see at 100 GB but the 64 bit Version of XP Pro formats to300 GB. Even using Acronis' partitioning software I can't get what I want out of 2000. I believe it's an ATAPI dependency issue because the 300 GB Maxtor external is fine on either computer. The firmware on the device has to be supported by the OS at whatever capacity you want to use. Sony might have a BIOS update.
I haven't bothered with hardware since the mid 90's when the money went out of it. LOL
Reply to
John R. Carroll
That sounds a lot like New Mexico. :-) ...Lew...
Reply to
Lewis Hartswick
In XP you have to set the flash drive to Performance, then you can format it NTFS.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
On Sat, 12 Dec 2009 10:00:35 -0800 (PST), the infamous Jim Wilkins scrawled the following:
Aha, it started formatting after that. We'll soon see... "Windows is unable to complete the formatting of this drive."
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Not generally gonna work (the U3 partition is read-only, like a CD). What does work, is the Sandisk utility (available from their website) but even THAT is awkward for us Macintosh users. I have to fire up my toy/game machine to do it...
On MacOS, the extra partition loads and puts an icon up, and it can't always be unloaded. Little leftover icons, they only go away after a reboot.
Reply to
whit3rd
I've seen that recently on USB drives that the marketing department of a company I work for bought, it seemed that if you transferred too large a file to it, but below the FAT limit of its file system, it would choke and be unusable and would give the same or similar message and could not be re-formatted. Probably not worth their time but I'll pass on the information.
Reply to
David Billington
I doubt that's the problem in this case.
This site's
formatting link
a bit muddled, but it describes the tidal wave of fake flash memory from criminal vendors, and tells you how to test, what your recourse is, etc. Bottom line: if you see a flash memory deal that seems too good to be true, then it probably is. Be especially wary of vendors who've taken the time to build up good feedback records by selling cheap $ items like screen protectors. Once they've got their feedback rating looking solid by selling that stuff, they dump out a bunch of fake flash and then move on to a new ID.
Wayne
Reply to
wmbjkREMOVE
The only 'good' thing about U3 is it gets around security on the boxen at work. Having once worked in IT, that really is a bad thing but I was speaking from the lusers perspective.
U3 devices require an utility to wipe out the U3 functionality.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes

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