something cool yesterday

My son got his bicycle chain all caught around the crank. The only solution
was to pull the crank off, for which I needed a special puller. No problem!
To the toolbox I went, dug down a few layers and produced a special puller
for my own bike that I made under my grampa's direction on his 9 inch Atlas.
This was way back when I was still in university. I built this tool before
you were born, I declared to my son. See, its even engraved Grampa & Bill
1985. The boy was only moderately impressed. He was way more interested in
getting the bike fixed than hearing a discourse on the providence of the
tools we were using. So I showed my wife later and she was not impressed at
all. Especially when I admitted I had now used the tool twice, once in
1985, and once yesterday. You're such a packrat, it doesn't surprise me at
all she says. So I put the tool back in the box. Someday I'll pull it out
again, and I'll not tell anyone where it came from, because I know. Grampa
can't even walk any more, let alone spend an afternoon working on his old
(but bought new in 1956) Atlas. But we did in 1985, and I've got the tool
to prove it. Maybe some of you guys will understand.
Reply to
Bill Chernoff
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Bill,
Great story and one I can truly appreciate....
Dave Young
Bill Chernoff wrote:
Reply to
Dave Young
Sure do. Remeber to call Grampa and tell him.
I built my garage workbench in 1964 when I was 14 using my grandfather's bit and brace and a handsaw. In 1975 I put a hex head sheet metal screw in the leg so my two year old son could turn it in and out with a socket wrench. I've moved four times since then but never had the heart to remove the screw.
Reply to
Howard
Yup, I understand and appreciate it. I've got several of my grandfathers tools, and special little bits and pieces he made way back many moons ago.
Lane
Reply to
Just Me
My grandpas have both been dead for years, but to this day I enjoy nothing more than using their old hand tools. Nothing particularly special about them, except who owned 'em. It's kind of like they're helping out on the projects.
Reply to
Dave Hinz
It was about 1985 when it snowed in Seattle and some idiot in front of me stopped timidly halfway up a hill, leaving me no choice but to stop and back down the icy slope before someone jammed up behind me. My car slid slowly sideways and down, coming to rest gently against the corner of another car. No damage except I had a neat full moon dimple about 20" across in the door. I bought a rubber suction cup and popped out the dimple and felt real proud of myself. About two weeks ago a friend of my son's showed up to pick him up. He was driving his mom's Volvo station wagon with a very similar dent. I impressed the hell out of everyone by pulling out that same suction cup and popping out his dent. Not so much because I knew how to pop out the dent, but because I knew exactly where a tool was I bought 20 years ago and hadn't touched since except to move about 4 times. Packrat? Maybe, but it saved heavy body work costs both times, and didn't take up much room. Either a guy has tools or he doesn't. - GWE
Bill Chernoff wrote:
Reply to
Grant Erwin
...and they don't sell atlas lathes at sprawl-mart
bravo.
I tell people all the time, I don't want cheap, I want quality.
I regularly spend too much of my income on quality as opposed to cheap crap.
Just imagine what the segment of our population with enuf $ to buy a $40K motorcycle could do if they insisted on better consumer products...
Reply to
Jon Grimm
I understand perfectly. Make sure to visit Granddad and tell him, maybe show him the tool again, he will understand, too. And apprecate it more than most of us can know. Great feeling, great story. Thanks. -Al A.
Reply to
clavius.a
Here is one for you -- excuse the long link. Check out the clip "Old Man" by the Irish Tenors here (part way down the page):
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The whole album is great, but that song in particular is very moving.
mikey
Reply to
Mike Fields
Bill, My Grampa died when I was young. I still miss him. You're story is great and is the way life should be. Your son will probably dredge that story up 20 years from now. Eric
Reply to
Eric R Snow
Damn right. If people didn't buy crap, the market wouldn't be flooded with it. It annoys me intensely!
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Just went down and checked the 16 W x 12 x 12" 5 drawer chest I use to store drafting equipment. It was made by Grandad from wood salvaged from dynamite boxes and orange crates. He even made the drawer pulls from wood, although he did use nails (metal content) to reinforce the glue. On the bottom of the first drawer he signed and dated it July 11, 1953. My youngest carries this GF's pocket knife and the other GF's Waltham pocket watch. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
Reply to
Gerald Miller
There are times when one wants to buy quality, and then there are times when one needs a tool but does not expect to use it except for the current task. What is annoying is not being able to find quality when one wants and needs it.
Dan
Christ> > ...and they don't sell atlas lathes at sprawl-mart
Reply to
dcaster
For the first, I borrow the item whenever possible!
For the second, I bite the bullet and pay the money.
Jim
Reply to
jim rozen
My philosophy too.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
That reminds me of what a teacher of mine once told me. He said: "I don't buy cheap tools. I can't afford them. They are too expensive."
(Because he always ended up replacing them)
Abrasha
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Reply to
Abrasha

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