Spray lube question

I'm sure, this has been discussed to death. And, I'll start a flame war.
Various people quoting authorities back to Aristotle, and Confuscious.
Which spray lubes do what? I was helping do a brake job, Saturday. The lugs
didn't want to come off. The drums rotted to the hub, the rotors rotted to
the hub. Bolts that were supposed to hold a bracket over the rotor, rusted.
The folks who own the car were using WD as a lubricant. Try to free drums
from hub, and free bolts to come out. Wasn't doing much that I could tell.
I've tried Deep Lube, PB Blaster, Kroil, and Castle Thrust. Of those, I
recently had a really good result with Castle Thrust (Ion activated!).
I'm in New York State, so we have plenty of rock salt on the roads, and rust
is a major issue. What's likely to penetrate and loosen rusted drums, hubs,
rotors, lug nuts, bolts, etc?
Christopher A. Young
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
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Sure, protons. Can't beat 'em.
I've read about Automatic Transmission Fluid, and.. and... kerosene? A mix of ATF and kerosene (I think) is reputedly the best, followed by Kroil, PB Blaster, etc., on down to WD40 bringing up the rear.
Reply to
beryl
Can't argue with this order too much. You can't beat a smoke wrench (torch) to make it work faster. For the first time, I go only say 300 degrees and squirt my favorite stuff on (any higher and it catches fire). Give it several minutes to cool and work. In my experience this gets 95% of the ones that will ever come apart. For the worst, I go hotter, let it cool below the fire point, apply the stuff. Then the key is time, wait several hours, re-apply, go to bed, re apply, wait some more; then hit it. When that don't work set the smoke wrench on high and cut it out.
The first item you mention is almost Ed's Red:
CONTENTS: Ed's Red Bore Cleaner
a.. 1 part Dexron ATF, GM Spec. D-20265 or later.
b.. 1 part Kerosene - deodorized, K1
c.. 1 part Aliphatic Mineral Spirits
d.. 1 part CAS #64741-49-9, or substitute "Stoddard Solvent", CAS #8052-41-3, or equivalent. (WD40 is nearly all stoddard solvent)
e.. 1 part Acetone, CAS #67-64-1. (finger nail polish remover)
f.. (Optional 1 lb. of Lanolin, Anhydrous, USP per gallon, or OK to substitute Lanolin, Modified, Topical Lubricant, from the drug store)
Reply to
Karl Townsend
Well, WD40 just isn't going to do it. I've used LPS 1 for years. The roommate at the time had a Bronco that came out of WI and I had to remove the bumper bolts. I was chinning myself on a 4' cheater, not moving. I had just gotten a can of LPS 1, so tried that. Spritzed the back and came back the next morning, the stuff had spread out in a 6" bullseye on the front. The nuts came off with one hand like they were new. So when I can get it, that's the stuff I use for a penetrant. Just tried Seafoam's Deep Creep, smells like LPS 2 but lighter weight. Haven't had any stuff as rusted up as that Bronco, but it worked on the latest buggy that's been salt-chewed a mite. NAPA carries that. For brake drums, a propane torch going around and around the stud circle plus a small sledge did the job. Eventually went pong and could be popped off. Don't have caliper problems, knock two keys out on the Ford and they lift right off. Rotors needed some heavy persuasion to come off the studs, but weren't welded on with rust. A 2 lb sledge does wonders.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
last time I had to remove front disks on a vehicle (my own truck) I had to use a big gear puller.
A bit of the hub sticks through the rotor when mounted, and the hub surface rusts enough to bond the rotor on. The join of the two parts was in a bit of a crack, so there was no way to wire brush it clean.
Reply to
DougC
When you put discs back on after cleaning them, apply anti-seize to the hub and inside of the disc hole. That stops them from rusting on and makes it easier to remove them in the future.
Jim
Reply to
n427c
On the one couple of bolts, that held the bracket over the rotor. I did find that heat worked better than WD, to get it loosened up. I had to angle the flame in, so as not to light up the CV boot. Seems like something combustible is always near by.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Can't argue with this order too much. You can't beat a smoke wrench (torch) to make it work faster. For the first time, I go only say 300 degrees and squirt my favorite stuff on (any higher and it catches fire). Give it several minutes to cool and work. In my experience this gets 95% of the ones that will ever come apart. For the worst, I go hotter, let it cool below the fire point, apply the stuff. Then the key is time, wait several hours, re-apply, go to bed, re apply, wait some more; then hit it. When that don't work set the smoke wrench on high and cut it out.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Normally, I do exactly that. Well, both of those. Wire brush to remove as much rust as I could (don't think I had a wire brush within reach). And then, never sieze for assembly. Tube of never sieze was many miles away.
Unfortunately, this wasn't a normal situation.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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When you put discs back on after cleaning them, apply anti-seize to the hub and inside of the disc hole. That stops them from rusting on and makes it easier to remove them in the future.
Jim
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
You can get flame guards/masks as a kind of ceramic cloth at big box plumbing departments, have used mine a lot. Supposed to be used for backing up copper solder jobs in tight spots where a torch flame will burn down the house otherwise. Works well.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer
Should be able to report or the effectiveness of Kroil in a day or so. Some studs going thru a iron casting with a jam nut. Badly rusted as it had been underwater for about 90 years. Ground a lot of the jam nuts off and used a cold chisel to get all of the jam nuts gone. Heated with a mapp torch and then applied Kroil. No immediate joy. Will see if thing are better tomorrow. Otherwise it is drill out and pick out time. No need for a left hand drill as the stud goes thru the casting.
=20 Dan
Reply to
dcaster
You know, I hadn't thought of that. I used to have a piece of sheet metal, I'd put under fittings when I was doing HVAC install, and used to drip silver solder on the condensor pad. Thanks for a great idea.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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You can get flame guards/masks as a kind of ceramic cloth at big box plumbing departments, have used mine a lot. Supposed to be used for backing up copper solder jobs in tight spots where a torch flame will burn down the house otherwise. Works well.
Stan
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I am curious how that works, for you.
Someone (probably here on RCM) suggested to drip candle wax (from a burning slim taper candle) on the fitting, as it cools. The first drips of wax probably vaporize, but then it goes in to the magic temp and then the paraffin wicks into the threads. I'll admit, I've not tried this. Not sure I had a candle availble, last Saturday.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Should be able to report or the effectiveness of Kroil in a day or so. Some studs going thru a iron casting with a jam nut. Badly rusted as it had been underwater for about 90 years. Ground a lot of the jam nuts off and used a cold chisel to get all of the jam nuts gone. Heated with a mapp torch and then applied Kroil. No immediate joy. Will see if thing are better tomorrow. Otherwise it is drill out and pick out time. No need for a left hand drill as the stud goes thru the casting.
Dan
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
I don't expect any technique to work all the time. So, thanks, I'll remember to try that. Have to stock a candle of sorts in with my tools, now.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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I've used the candle and it works - sometimes.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Yeah, those are welding blankets, I need to get one or more of those. The pad I have is about 9x12", good for packing in under a sink. Ace had it, IIRC. Fits right in the zipper bag I've got for the torch and soldering prep stuff for plumbing. Can put the full torch flame on it and the wood in back of it doesn't even get warm, truly space-age stuff. Haven't needed it a lot lately, most everything is plastic and flex lines now, need channellocks more than a torch.
Stan
Reply to
Stanley Schaefer

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