Spray welding cast iron questions

At work, we have a spray welder that nobody uses anymore. They used to
use it to build up broken parts off cast iron engine blocks and heads.
I have a project where I need to build up the outside of a cast iron
exhaust manifold, and I would like to try using the spray welder to do
this. The only guy who used to use this rig no longer works there.
Markings on the torch:
On handle: EUTALLOY M10 B
Serial Number on trigger area:
E 000401
The tip is stamped 48
The powder is ARCTEC P333
I am told everything has been rebuilt, and is collecting dust under the
bench. Any tips on the use of this type of equipment?
thanks, ron
Reply to
rbce2003
Loading thread data ...
Is it one of the primitive breeds that looks like a bastard of an OA-torch and a spray gun?
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
from what i have seen the cast iron whould be heated to a certain temperature--then the metal pos\wder isa used in a torch like tool where it flows into the flame and is splattered ointo the cast iron--very cool to see==better than fikreworks
Reply to
ilaboo
Nick, Yes, it is looks alot like an acet. torch, with a plastic reservoir for the powder. I forgot my camera today, as I was going to take a pic.
Have they changed in design?
Thanks!
Reply to
rbce2003
Eutalloy sounds like a Eutectic-Castolin product. Perhaps like this?
It's been a long time since I've dealt with them, but Eutectic used to sell direct thru their own reps. I'd try to get an instruction book from the rep.
formatting link
Ned Simmons
Reply to
Ned Simmons
You have it correct. Used to do flame spraying at the old shop with ceramic coatings. It is a VERY adaptable process, you use the same gun to do ceramic, aluminum, steel, iron, nickel and just about any other material that will not simply ignite in the flame.
You need to preheat the parts to a temperature based on the alloy in question. Then once the part is heated you ignite the torch and set the flame to a nice neutral flame UNLESS your attempting to add carbon or doing a hard surfacing coat. Then you spray a nice even THIN layer onto the part, one coat and preheat again, then the next layer, until your at the thickness you need to start with. It doesn't hurt to blast the part so it is rough and the pores are open as well prior to the heating step.
Reply to
Steve W.
So it is the simple type. Eutectic makes them, UTP (I think only here in Germany did sell them).
There are others. Electric ones with plasma and shielding gas. Ned described the usage, so not so much to add. Get the specific description for your powder and see wether it serves. There are hard wearing ones, ones for filling up, ones for corrosive protection, thermal isolation ...
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Mine was made by ThermaDyne - looks identical to this one:
formatting link
At the bottom of the page there are some basic instructions. The "63TG" powder is the general "build-up" powder for cast iron... but I've never had any luck with used exhaust manifolds. Even with pre- and post- heating they crack, and crack, and crack. >;-( David
Reply to
David Courtney
It's no wonder! That stuff is for coating, and not for welding. :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
The stuff that came with my kit is Victor #22 "Build-up" powder. According to the litereature:
. FPBP-22 (22 Rockwell) Shaft build-up; cast iron repair, cracked exhaust manifolds. Easily machined.
Even with pre-heat and post-heat... the used exhaust manifolds all crack.
formatting link

Reply to
David Courtney
Salesperson blablabla. I can't imagine how a flame-spraying power should repair cracks. That claim is really idiotic!
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
I agree, I would be very skeptical of flame spraying cast iron. Has anyone here actually tried this?
Tony
Reply to
Tony
Ive got a complete set, along with a dozen or so bottles of verious powders. I can probably scan the manual for you if you would like.
Gunner
Political Correctness
A doctrine fostered by a delusional, illogical liberal minority and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.
Reply to
Gunner

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.