stuck in park

"The Kid" is closing on his house today. backing his van up a steep hill with a heavy trailer, he put it in park and got out to make sure he wasn't
going to hit anything. Now, its stuck.
I leave in a bit over an hour to help him out and loan him a car if there's not a quick fix.
He did jack up one rear wheel to relieve pressure, no joy.
Any quick ideas?
Karl
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If a rear drive vehicle, jacking up one rear wheel probably would not relieve pressure through the differential. Usual fix is to push (jog) the vehicle against the direction of the jam to relieve pressure; then take it out of park.
Bob Swinney
"The Kid" is closing on his house today. backing his van up a steep hill with a heavy trailer, he put it in park and got out to make sure he wasn't going to hit anything. Now, its stuck.
I leave in a bit over an hour to help him out and loan him a car if there's not a quick fix.
He did jack up one rear wheel to relieve pressure, no joy.
Any quick ideas?
Karl
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Sounds like a plan, I'll bring a come along to try and pull it backward and an old tire to push on it if that don't go.
karl
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Only if the differential is a locking type. Even limited slip will relieve pressure. My opinion is that the parking pawl is beginning to shear and is unable to withdraw from the drum. phil

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Karl Townsend wrote:

Geez, if that thing is sitting on a hill with a loaded trailer and just that parking pawl stopping it.....
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Ever taken a transmission apart, and seen just how heavy that pawl actually is? It's a pretty stout piece of very hard steel.
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Doug Miller wrote:

I probably have seen several, but the only one I really paid attention to was way smaller than I would have liked it to be. I've never trusted them since, always using the manual brake on hills, and angling the steering to direct toward a curb or other stopper.
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I had the opposite reaction: I'm much more trusting of the pawl after having seen how large it is.
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Doug Miller wrote:

Maybe they were different transmissions :)
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RBnDFW wrote:

Perhaps folks are also forgetting the mechanical advantage the "little" pawl in the transmission has due to the gearing past it in the differential. The somewhat rare driveshaft parking brakes use the same gearing advantage.
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wrote:

Could be, but more likely he let it get on the pawl before setting the brakes. Has he reversed the order, he wouldn't be in this pickle. He's the one who has the diesel truck issue, too. I hope the rest of his move is uneventful.
Pete Keillor
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On 05/24/2010 08:37 AM, Karl Townsend wrote:

I always forget the basics in situations like this. I'm one of those guys who will have the TV or computer ripped half apart before I realize that it's unplugged, or that the circuit breaker to the plug got turned off when we were rewiring that switch and oh yea, we never turned it back on, etc.
Of course, other than a jammed transmission, the only basic that I can think of is the linkage.
Be sure to check the linkage.
And don't get rolled over by a van, then a trailer, if you happen to be underneath when you get it unjammed.
--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
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Karl... Do you have a large prybar, some kind of a strong plate and a helper?
Assuming this is a four wheeler trailer...
I would
1) Put chocks under the trailer's rear pair of wheels 2) unhook the trailer 3) Put the plate under the front wheel of the trailer 4) Push front tires of the trailer, to move back, inch by inch, with a big prybar 5) Have your helper move the chocks back too
This should move the trailer away from the truck.
Then your truck is not pushed as hard.
i
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If this is a van built in the last decade or so, check the brake light fuse and the lights themselves. If they don't light when you depress the brakes, that's your problem.
I found this out the hard way. <g> I can't give you specifics, but that is a VERY common problem with recent vehicles stuck in park.
--
Ed Huntress



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On 05/24/2010 09:59 AM, Ed Huntress wrote:

Some stupid lockout circuit, that won't let you shift to park unless the brakes are on?
Argh.
--
Tim Wescott
Control system and signal processing consulting
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Yup. Or it won't let you shift *out* of park. Maybe both, I dunno. And apparently it's very common.
I just Googled it to be sure, and I see that the same problem is mentioned all over the place. It happened to me in my 2004 Ford Focus. A lot of people with F150 pickups seem to have run into the same thing.
--
Ed Huntress



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My Govt. Motors 2004 Pontiac GXP had one of those stupid interlock problems. It was locked into 'Drive" and would not go into 'Park" because of failure of one of the lock-out solenoids. Better living through electromechanics.
Bob Swinney

Yup. Or it won't let you shift *out* of park. Maybe both, I dunno. And apparently it's very common.
I just Googled it to be sure, and I see that the same problem is mentioned all over the place. It happened to me in my 2004 Ford Focus. A lot of people with F150 pickups seem to have run into the same thing.
--
Ed Huntress



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So when you can't get it into park, then you can't start it again because it isn't in park. That is one of those things where you know bad just came, worse is coming.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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Naw! I guess it "failed safe" in some way. It would not go into park. Evidently the (failed) relay logic knew to let it start in drive. I high-tailed it home 25 miles and took it in for repair under extened warranty the next day.
Bob Swinney
wrote:

So when you can't get it into park, then you can't start it again because it isn't in park. That is one of those things where you know bad just came, worse is coming.
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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You got lucky. Did you start in in neutral?
Wes -- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
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