Two headed nickel

I just made a two headed nickel.
I used a soft 5c collet and bored it to hold the nickel.
Then I made two nickels bored out to .800 dia x .036
deep.[ Half of coin.]
Then I faced and turned a piece of stock to .800 then
I put the bored out coin over the turned dia. Then I
used a live center pushing a bushing against coin to
drive it. Took light cuts about .01 and turned it to
.800 bore size. then I pressed coin slug into the bored piece
and ended up with two headed nickel with no seam showing.
Worked great.
Jim
Have pics if anyone interested.
Reply to
jim
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Didn't say it was an American nickel. grin.
Reply to
jim
That may be true stateside, but in the UK defacing the coinage is a criminal offence iirc
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
On Thu, 14 Aug 2003 22:12:52 -0700, jim wrote in Msg.
I'd like to see some because I didn't really understand the process.
--Daniel
Reply to
Daniel Haude
Interesting stuff here:
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~D
Reply to
Dave
AFAIK that's the reason for the milled edges on some coins. Sharp cookies used to shave the outside diameters of gold and silver coins with a sharp knife. They could create quite a little pile of gold dust for themselves that way. Milling the edges made the "skinning" obvious, and you could refuse to accept a coin for that reason.
Jeff
-- Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can keep smiling when things go wrong, you've thought of someone to place the blame on."
Reply to
Jeff Wisnia
Remember - for years money has been used in jewelry. And why not - it takes it out of circulation and the Gov. makes a mint!
Martin
Reply to
Eastburn
Nope. The Govt. already HAS the mint. < HeH! > They just mint more coinage.
Reply to
Don Thompson
here I was hoping to read an article about coining.
We made some coining dies in house for comemmorative events.
The dies weremade from mild steel, then case hardened, and bead blasted
we used brass coin blanks
coined in a 60 ton hydraulic shop press
Reply to
Jon
Would you show the pictures of the process please, because I do not quite understand your explanation.
Reply to
Abrasha
While we wait for the pictures, here's my understanding of his process: Nickels are about .73" thick and .835" wide. He cut away a .8x.036 section of the Monticello side of each nickel. He then cut away the rim on one of them, making a .8x.036 disk, which he pressed into the .8x.036 hole of the other.
To cut away the rim, he chucked a .8" cylinder and pressed one of the bored nickels onto it, holding it there by tailstock pressure while taking light cuts on the rim. -jiw
Reply to
James Waldby
...
.73 is a typo for .073. Incidentally, .073" is based on measuring a stack of 4 nickels; individually, they measured at about (a) .069 to .0715, (b) .074 to .077, (c) .073 to .079, (d) .072 to .078. Thickness depends on what chord you measure, and I show the min and max out of about 5 measurements per nickel.
-jiw
Reply to
James Waldby
And lo, it came about, that on Fri, 15 Aug 2003 07:55:18 -0700 in rec.crafts.metalworking , Jon Anderson was inspired to utter:
The story as I have it is that I can mark, paint, added to, etc coin, currency, etc as long as I do not intend to change the value there of.
In other words, as long as you don't try and pass off a double sided nickel as worth ten cents, then what have you done? Removed one (two?) nickels from circulation. (Not to mention the cost of the metal slug and the machine time. Kind of like the story of the guy who would use a fifty cent piece to make counterfeit quarters.)
In other words - a neat little project. As long as it is a "novelty" and not meant to defraud, "way kool"
Now, can you do it with a dime? :-)
A Dutch dime? (Those were even smaller.)
Reply to
pyotr filipivich
Perhaps so -- but have the laws been changed to reflect the current materials? Old laws tend to hang around for a long time.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I just made myself one of these double sided nickels. Jim, thanks again for the email and for the photos.
It took me about 30 minutes. It came out all right, albeit not perfect.
This "double nickel" is going to make a great April Fools day present for my oldest son who collects coins. One of his prized possessions is a double strike quarter, so a two headed nickel might get some attention too.
Can't wait to see his face. Abrasha
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Reply to
Abrasha
...
Jim sent the photos to me also, and with his permission I combined some of them together and posted to the dropbox:
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nickel21.jpg (64KB) - Nickel chucked in shop-modified soft collet, being bored; nickel in collet after boring; closeup of two bored nickels.
nickel22.jpg (48KB) - Round stock with .800" faced and turned; bored nickel in place on end of stock; using tailstock, live center, and bushing to hold nickel in place for turning to remove rim.
nickel23.jpg (28KB) - Closeup of one bored nickel with rim, and other bored nickel with rim removed; closeup of nickel as pressed together.
-jiw
Reply to
James Waldby
Thanks for the photos, I don't have a collet setup but I think I'll try the same basic method using some fixturing alloy to secure the coin in a shallow bore in the end of a round, perhaps hard wax if I can keep it cool enough while turning or as others have suggested crazy glue.
John
Please note that my return address is wrong due to the amount of junk email I get. So please respond to this message through the newsgroup.
Reply to
John Flanagan
And lo, it came about, that on Sun, 17 Aug 2003 15:27:14 -0400 in rec.crafts.metalworking , "Jon" was inspired to utter:
I've done it the "old fashioned" way: heat the blanks, then place on pile, and one guy holds the top die, and when centered and ready he nods his head and the guy with the 5 pound sledge hits it. The die, not the helper's head. :-)
Loads of fun. >
Reply to
pyotr filipivich

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