Ultimate Workshop?

RJ, I am currently building a home using the ARXX system. www.arxxbuild.com It is going together well and we are very happy with it so far.
If the website does not answer your questions, I might be able to help out. To answer your question about string trimmers, lawn mowers, etc. - a parge coat of thinset concrete is installed on the gap between the ground and the siding. Regards, Jim

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http://www.integraspec.com/frame.html
This is the system I used. There are about a dozen of them around here. I built mine from the footings to the eaves in one solid wall. The foam wall is put up first and then it is filled with cement. The big advantage is that you end up with a monolithic slab for a wall, so there are no air gaps anywhere. It is important to plan ahead though, because if you need to add a hole later, it is difficult(but not impossible). The walls on the inside are finished anyway you choose(I went with OSB to withstand the inevetible dings in a shop). The outside can be finished in any conventional manner(mine is colored sheet steel). I have been taking pictures throughout the entire project, but have not gotten around to building a website yet. I can send you some if you want.
JW
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Would you mind posting some pics to
http://photobucket.com/ or to the dropbox
for all interested to see?
RJ

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I picked a few out of what I have on my PC with me. I have a bunch more at home. This covers the basic structure.
Pic 13 shows the beginning of the wall before the bracing is installed.
http://img17.photobucket.com/albums/v51/cyberzl1/Picture_013.jpg
This shows the wall a little higher and the bracing installed for the first stage.
http://img17.photobucket.com/albums/v51/cyberzl1/Picture_022.jpg
A look down the wall from the top before it is filled with cement. The PVC that can be seen near the bottom of the wall is for running wiring, water, etc. The rebar can be seen at this point too. There is also vertical bars dropped in every 2 feet to form a 2x2 grid of rebar.
http://img17.photobucket.com/albums/v51/cyberzl1/Picture_029.jpg
Getting ready to do the first pour. That cement pump is an amazing machine. The operator has a remote control that can do just about everything except drive the machine down the road.
http://img17.photobucket.com/albums/v51/cyberzl1/Picture_031.jpg Complete walls ready for the final(2nd) pour. All of the doors are framed properly. The walls are braced and straight.
http://img17.photobucket.com/albums/v51/cyberzl1/Picture_079.jpg Any more questions, drop me a line.
JW
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On 28 Jan 2004 06:14:19 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeridiah) brought forth from the murky depths:

The building looked small next to the concrete pump truck in one pic, but now that it's up, I see just how huge it really is.
Is it just the angle of the pictures, or is that sitting in a hole? The drainage angles are scary in the photos. =:0
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Might be the angle, because it is pretty close to flat. I think there was something like 2 foot of drop across the entire site when I started. For reference, it is 40 ft deep x 48 ft wide x 16 ft height.
I ran 4" perf pipe all the way around the footing and off to a nearby tileline to keep any water that would collect headed away from the buidling.
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Jeridiah, thanks man, that was pretty interesting.
RJ

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One thing I highly recommend. Install a "deadman" in the floor if you are pouring a slab. They are great for straightening chassis, trailer tongues, etc. Install a 1/2" - 3/4" u-bolt or loop in a metal recessed box with lid, so floor is flat. Just drill a finger hole. Make sure box is large enough for chain, hands, etc. Got this idea and a lot of great others from a booklet of old shop articles out of Progressive Farmer mag. called All-Time Great Farm Shops. see http://www.progressivefarmer.com/farmer/store/book/0,14935,322463,00.html
--
Ted Walker
" Jack of all trades, master of none" , but still working on it!
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Did that. Put in 3 actually. Two in a straght line(obviously) across from each other and parallel to the middle door, and one off by itself in the middle of the floor. Haven't used them yet, but can see where they would be very useful.
Highly recommend putting in a loft. It will save you a lot of floor space and gain a lot of storage space. I have a full depth loft that is 16' wide. With the 16' sidewall I have about 8' clearance under and 6'10" over. This was the reason I went for the 16' sidewall. It added very little to the overall cost of the building and yielded me w/ ~30% more effective floor space. I have 2 rows of 4' wide industrial racks with 2 shelves. More shelf space than a sane person should need....
JW
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On 30 Jan 2004 05:57:34 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Jeridiah) wrote:
|> One thing I highly recommend. Install a "deadman" in the floor if you are |> pouring a slab. They are great for straightening chassis, trailer tongues, |> etc. Install a 1/2" - 3/4" u-bolt or loop in a metal recessed box with lid, | |Did that. Put in 3 actually. Two in a straght line(obviously) across |from each other and parallel to the middle door, and one off by itself |in the middle of the floor. Haven't used them yet, but can see where |they would be very useful. | |Highly recommend putting in a loft. It will save you a lot of floor |space and gain a lot of storage space. I have a full depth loft that |is 16' wide. With the 16' sidewall I have about 8' clearance under |and 6'10" over. This was the reason I went for the 16' sidewall. It |added very little to the overall cost of the building and yielded me |w/ ~30% more effective floor space. I have 2 rows of 4' wide |industrial racks with 2 shelves. More shelf space than a sane person |should need....
Use open grid flooring for the loft so it won't accumulate dirt. Rex in Fort Worth
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oh riiiight, then all the shit can fall on the machines below?

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I built an ICF house 5 years ago and love it. I used REWARD system which has R-38 in the walls. Had a Mennonite group build it for me. They ‘framed’ it and closed it in and then turned it over to me. I have done almost everything else myself - plumbing, wiring flooring.... Oh, forgot - moved the machinery in !
The house is out in the country (central Ohio) and I have a natural gasline running across the property so I heat with gas. The house itself is about 4000 sq ft plus a full basement with drive out doors - 2 4x8 walk doors. I can drive my PU into the basement and close the doors. This is where I have my maching shop - Bridgie, lathe, woodworking equipment, etc. I used to have my shop in the garage at the old house and in winter I could not work out there due to the cold. Plus you have the condensation problem. The only problem I have when I cut heavy and generate smoke is the smell it generates. So I put a hose next to the cutter and run it to an exhaust extractor to suck the smoke and smell outside.
I have 9 foot ceilings all 3 floors and used very large oversize Eagle Windows (highly recommended - 5/8 inch between the glass and cost 20% less than Anderson and their 1/2 inch gap). I also installed R-38 insulation in the ceiling of the second floor.
The attached garage is 36x48 with an 18x8 and an 18x10 overhead door. The ceiling is 11 feet and I insulated the ceiling with R30. The garage is ICF also and I don’t heat it.
The first year I was in the house we had a very cold snap during the winter and I heard people I work with complaining about their nightmarish heating bills at their homes for that month - $800 to $1000 ! I was in fear for my life, as I had not gotten my bill yet. When it came I didn’t want to open the envelope. It was $352 for the month. I was pleased, considering I had the T-Stat set at about 70. Since then I have never had a bill that high. Oh, yeah, that included my gas hot water, which is a recirculating system that costs me on the average $35 per month and I’m the only one here, no women taking long baths.
The garage, as I mentioned, is not heated and does get chilly in the winter but by March the temperature in the garage has only gone down to about 40 degrees. I have to admit that I don’t use the garage for cars yet and the overhead doors are rarely open. If I need to work on a car in it, I have a propane torpedo heater I use for spot heat. I have some 2 inch styrofoam that I will insulate the doors with to help the winter chilling problem.
I had the builder install four 2 inch sleeves from the basement to the garage so I could run electricals, water, air, plumbing for a urinal....
I also had the excavator dig a 3 foot square hole, 9 feet deep in one of the bays and dropped a 3 foot diameter plastic field tile into it and backfilled with gravel around it. Then I poured the floor and as they were finishing the crete, I put a 2x4 in it at grade level to provide for a trough after it set up. I pulled it out and was able to lay a pipe in it to the air compressor. I dropped my gas station lift into the hole and plumbed it and poured grout into the trough. The tile stuck up over the floor and I cut it flush with a carpenters saw before I installed the lift. I hung the lift in the hole with a cherry picker engine hoist to the right height and filled the hole with dry sand.
Anyway, the ICF structure is THE WAY TO GO ! If I build another house (or shop) I will definitely use it again.
wrote:

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|I've been researching that subject, and it sounds mighty sweet. My only |issue is that I have a nice Hilti anchor drill, and I ain't afraid to use |it! <G> Luckily, my compressors were bolted down during the flood. Still |considering it though. How expensive is the radiant heat to operate in fuel |costs? Thinking about a gas pack for quick heat, with radiant for more |extended work periods. Thanks.
SOLAR if your climate makes it feasible! With a small water heater for backup.
|> If you're in a climate that needs heat in the winter I would suggest a |> radiant floor heat. There is nothing worse than having a floor that is |> cold while working on a vehicle. I know. I have radiant floor heating |> in the house but not in the garage. I can warm the garage with a |> heater but the floor is still cold. All you would need would be a |> water heater and circulating pump. And like "jim" said lot's of power. |> I'd go for a 200 amp service. |> Hopefully I'll be able to build my shop in the next couple of years. |> Right now the basement is being used as a shop. Check out my web site. |> |> www.kingstonemodeleng.com |> |> Regards, |> Bernd |> |> | |
Rex in Fort Worth
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Speaking of radiant floor heating in the shop, it would seem like a good idea to somehow, very accurately, map the layout of your tubing in the floor. Someday you may want to run some anchor bolts into the concrete and it would really suck to hit a tube and have water squirting up through your floor.
--Dan

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That's what I've been seriously thinking of doing if I go the radiant route. Most of what I would bolt down would be within about 2 feet of the interior wall for floor stands for tools and such. The compressors will be in an anterior room this time around.
RJ

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Burying the tubing 3" to 4" down should clear most bolts. If they won't there's the expensive way - turn the system on and use some sort of thermal imaging device to map out the pipes...
Or the cheap way - spray a little water on the floor, turn the system up high, get down on your knees (I know, easy for some people...) ;-) and mark where the floor dries out first with a pencil. The marks will be right over the pipes.
--<< Bruce >>--
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I believe someone else here also used a third way: Don't drill where the cat likes to nap. :^) --Glenn Lyford
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Bernd, thanks for the shop tour. That looks like a nice, comfortable place for your type of hobby, for sure. I considered downsizing mine. Instead, I think I'll build larger this time. <G>
RJ

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place
Instead, I

The big shop is yet to come. I need to build a large shop to house that tractor, plus my dune buggy. Included will be a larger metal shop and woodworking shop. That small shop in the basememnt will be used for my model railroading activities. Have to finish the house first before the new shop can be built. If I don't the wife will make me a eunuch. <BG> She complains I spent to much time in the shop now.
Bernd
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There are a number of advantages to radiant floors. Cold floors can also be a source of condensation. I have had mine covered in water in the past. Installing underfloor heating forces you to insulate the floor. You don't loose any wall space for radiators or blowers etc. Downside is that it takes a long time to warm up.
John
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