Vacuum pump question



don't run alcohol though a vacuum pump with the motor running.
compressed air + alcohol = engine or fire.
vacuum pump oil itself can smell horrible even without unknown stuff mixed in.
I don't mind tearing pumps apart, as long as I know what they were used for, or were rebuilt and came with fresh oil.
If you don't want to tear it apart, you could try flushing it and dumping in fresh vacuum pump oil and repeating.
I always get standard pump and difusion pump oil from kurt lesker company. They have incredible tech support, and can surely tell you more about your pump than you could find on the internet.
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Change the oil. If it has a gas ballast, crack it open it for a few hours while the pump is running, this helps carry water and other contaminents through.
--
Dennis


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OK, I had a good look at it today. It's a Gomco 792 aspirator. It does use oil after all. I found a box packed with it, with some spares, and a new can of vacuum oil! The parts kit includes a new filter. There is also a manual, that is little more than a brochure. Several of these pumps are currently advertised on the net for around $400.00, so I guess a tool gloat is in order! The pump is apparently a rotary vane type made of cast iron with bronze slides/vanes.
Steve R.
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My mistake, it's a Gomco 789. Spare parts no longer available. Otherwise it works well. It's still worth much more than I paid for it. The pump will be just dandy for my needs. Any kind of used vacuum pump is very hard to find where I live. There are lot's of research labs in the Greater Victoria area, but used pumps just seem to be stored away, and seldom wind up on the local market.
Steve R.
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Reply address munged to bugger up spammers



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I used a spare vacuum pump a few years ago rather than suck on a pipe to assist in syphoning some petrol. I didn't use a fluid trap but turned off the pump as soon as soon as I possibly could - despite that a tiny, minscule drop of fuel somehow reached the pump. Nothing, not even multiple changes of oil would make the whiff of petrol go away every time the pump was used (for composites consolidation). In the end a full strip and seal change was necessary.
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