Airbrush Question

A quick question on airbrushes. Is the Aztek brand a good airbrush to start
with? I am looking to get my first airbrush and I can get one of these for a
reasonable price new. Is it worth it, or am I better off spending more and
getting a badger?
thanks in advance.
Steve
Reply to
SMarsh3807
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If you take a look around and note the airbrushes being used by other modellers you will quickly determine what are considered decent brands. Excluding the real cheap and nasties, most airbrushes are perfectly adequate/suitable.
Whilst I've never used Aztec they are specifically aimed at modellers and, by your own statments, are reasonably priced. I see no reason to discount it.
Reply to
The Raven
Ahaha. My wife is a professional illustrator. She uses exclusively an Aztec 480 (and still has her old 470 as a backup) and says that my Badger 100 is "a piece of junk with impossible air control". I could probably get her professional opinion about the other brands, too :)
My own opinion differs slightly but then, I only paint scale models, so my requirements are somewhat less strict...
Reply to
[SM04]Serge D. Grun
I was talking generally and not specific model numbers. It appears you agree that your airbrush is suitable to your needs.
Nonetheless, most brands of airbrushes are suited to modelling. It's just a matter of preference as to which brush each person prefers.
Reply to
The Raven
Varies from model to model in Aztek line.
I am scrapping my plastic Aztek DA. Temporarily using a Badger SA brush till I buy a new DA Badger.
The plastic Aztek brushes have restrictions on how strong a solvent you can use in cleaning, and the nozzles are complex as the dickens, restricting how much 'manual' cleaning you can do with them.
I find the Badger brushes very robust and easy to clean.
Aztek cheap plastic brushes may be fine as long as you scrupulously clean them, but if they get even partially clogged you have a problem.
SMarsh3807 wrote:
Reply to
Don Stauffer
I have one (some...) of each, and IMO it really boils down to what you like the feel of - I prefer my Badger 200, but that doesn't mean that you will.
I'd suggest going to the shop and just holding each in your hand side by side for a bit and working the actions - the one just that "feels" better to you is the one I'd recommend.
Reply to
Rufus
Thanks for all the replies. Some good advice from you all. I did get what I was looking for from you in that it is mostly personal preference, and at least there are no major flaws in the aztek models. I'll do a little more research before buying.
Steve
Reply to
SMarsh3807
Steve:
As I'm fond of pointing out, asking what is the best airbrush is like asking which is best: Blondes, Brunettes or Redheads? :-)
Bill Shuey
Reply to
William H. Shuey
I'd like to do that as I did with my airbrushes...........Try them out first!!! -- Dennis Loep The Glueing Dutchman
"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'" Isaac Asimov
Reply to
Bert&Ernie
All three at once???
Bill Shuey
Reply to
William H. Shuey
Just a thought, does the place you're considering purchasing it from carry replacement parts etc? It sure sux to buy a $3 part and pay an addt'l $4 to have it shipped.
SMarsh3807 wrote:
Reply to
Grandpa
What you are saying is that anything that blows is better than brushing by hand, right?
-Lasse
Reply to
Lasse Hilleroe Petersen
Comes close to me. I use a two-outlet splitter (it *could be* three!) just downstream of my moisture filter. On one side is a 'bargain' Badger double action internal mix brush I ran across for $26; on the other is my trusty old (first!) Paasche H. As cool as the Badger is, I'd still recommend the Paasche for a beginner. I loved it. -- C.R. Krieger (Been there; painted that)
Reply to
C.R. Krieger

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