Valve to fill additional compressed air tank

On Monday, December 9, 2013 2:17:11 PM UTC-5, Larry Jaques wrote:


Been there and done that. Not fun. If the pipes are metal , you can hook an Ac welder to the pipe with one connection to each side of the frozen se ction. Put the welder on the lowest current and turn it on. The current thru the pipe will heat the pipe enough to allow a trickle of water . And the trickle of water will melt more of the ice in the pipe.
A good long term solution is heat cable made by Raychem. It is a cable tha t does not draw much current when warm and more when cold. Look on the int ernet for better write up.
Dan
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My power outage emergency shower is a garden spray tank with a sink spray hose replacing the wand. I removed the dip tube and jammed 3/8" tubing into the tank outlet.
I heat a kettle of water on the wood stove, mix it to tolerable temperature in a pail, then fill the sprayer in the shower where spills don't matter. You could add a saucepan to scoop hot water from the kettle to the pail so you don't risk spilling it on your feet, and a bungee cord to hold the tank upright. The 2 gallon size of sprayer is a reasonable balance between running time and ease of handling when you and it are slippery with soap.
In the summer the sprayer is stored out back as a quick-reaction fire extinguisher. The modification makes it obvious that it isn't for chemicals. jsw
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On Tue, 10 Dec 2013 09:10:10 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Sounds like a winner, and something which could be used after the fall of civilization. (I'm soooo positive, aren't I?)

Excellent. Showering in RoundUp residue wouldn't do, would it?
UPDATE as of 10:45pm last evening: I have hot water! It was back down to 20F when the hot water suddenly came back on. I guess my day of heating things took a long while to work, but finally did. Whew! I have a hot cup of coffee in me and now it's off to the shower.
--
I hate being bipolar ....... It's awesome!

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wrote:

Also I don't want kids spraying each other in the face with pesticide. I bought a new sprayer for this. jsw
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================Check valve from compressor to primary tank, another from secondary to primary. Normally-closed solenoid valve from compressor to secondary, opens when primary >90PSI. Can be switched off. Primary feeds shop air line.
Compressor fills primary first to 90PSI, then solenoid valve to secondary opens, check valve into primary closes as compressor outlet pressure drops. Compressor brings up secondary.
If primary drops <90 then solenoid valve closes, compressor reverts to filling primary.
Once primary is >90, compressor returns to filling secondary.
Normally secondary supplies airline via check valve into primary, is refilled through open solenoid valve.
When demand is too high and pressure drops below 90PSI, solenoid valve closes so compressor discharges into primary, as does secondary through the tank-tank check valve until the demand drops below compressor capacity. Then the compressor refills the primary, and then the secondary.
I think that covers everything. jsw
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This is EXACTLY what I wanted to do, except the filling valve should open at 120 and close at 90. Thanks for explaining.
i
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message wrote:

90PSI was a placeholder to simplify the explanation.
Your unloader may require another check valve going into the secondary tank. jsw
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Right. I already found two 1/2 inch check valves, with manual valves on them also. If I do add a tank it should work out pretty good.
i
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On Fri, 06 Dec 2013 19:47:58 -0600, Ignoramus5722

Here is what I would use. The 60cfm model.
http://www.airtekltd.com/valves.htm#LOAD_GENIE
It will open and allow flow to the secondary tank at 120psi and block the flow when the primary tank drops to 90psi. A parallel line with a check valve to allow flow from the secondary to the primary would allow both tanks to supply the system below 90psi.
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I've had a Load Genie on my compressor since the 70's. It tends to jam from sideways loading on the inlet pipe, which expands when it heats up. Sometimes the Load Genie waits a minute or two after the compressor shuts off before unloading. jsw
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On Sun, 8 Dec 2013 07:39:10 -0500, "Jim Wilkins"

Shaving the gray hair off the Genie's inlet pipe should help the old guy.
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Interesting. There are several items listed. Do you mean item "NLG-1"?
i
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On Sun, 08 Dec 2013 10:07:29 -0600, Ignoramus3322

Yes, NLG-1. With this and the check valve, there is no need for electrical power to operate it.
I've had a larger model 140/175 on a service truck compressor for over 30 years. It is for constant running of the gas engine. When it builds to 175, the air is dumped overboard. It is loud. I put a lawn mower muffler on it. That is where you would connect to your secondary tank.
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OK, thanks, this is cool if I can do it without electrical connections, much better. This is what I was sort of hoping that I could find. Thank you
i
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OK, couple more question.
1. For my application, I need to simply connect my compressed air system to the inlet, cap the "outlet" connection, and connect tank to the muffler connection. Right?
2. Is it piloted or does it get pressure from the input line?
i

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On Sun, 08 Dec 2013 17:51:42 -0600, Ignoramus3322

Compressor output to inlet. Outlet to primary tank. Exhaust to secondary tank. Plug the throttle port.
Second line between tanks with check valve blocking flow from primary to secondary.
Startup of morning - secondary tank will be empty until primary is at 120. Then flow goes to secondary until primary drops to 90. Secondary will fill in increments. If primary usage keeps pressure below 90, no air will go to secondary.
Your pressure switch should be set 5psi higher than the unloader pressure so the pump doesn't turn off every time the unloader cycles. When the pump does turn off, both tanks will be at the same pressure and with usage, will bleed down together.
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On Fri, 06 Dec 2013 19:47:58 -0600, Ignoramus5722

Google Backpressure Regulator - Fisher makes them, and probably others. Holds off flow till the feed side is above a minimum.
We used them at Ye Olde GTE so that the underground cables always had ~9 PSI on them even if someone opened the aerial to work on it, rather than let the whole pipeline see a 'zero leak'.
Which is important if one of the manholes in the underground is full of water and also has a tiny leak on a case, you want to maintain pressure going out than have water coming in - if it's paper insulated cable, just a few drops of water and you're in huge trouble.
Even with Plastic insulated cables it can be real bad - Call it in if you ever see a flooded street with a little string of bubbles coming out of the phone manhole. If someone lets the pressure off somewhere else on that lead to work on a cable...
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Thanks.I will check them out.
They have them in air braked trucks too for the secondary system (wipers etc).
Interesting.
i

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OK, I got this nice tank, I may try your suggstions with it.
240 gallon Sylvan tank:
http://gagp.auctionhq.net/view-auctions/catalog/id/13/lot/1984
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Look closer. Compare it to garbage cans next to it. The one on the very right is a 44 gallon Brute cans.
I personally hope that it is a 240 gallon tank, but I will know when we bring it in.

Buy you did not rebuild the air end itself, right?
i
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