What are turbines made of (in power stations)

Does anyone know, what is the material to make turbines, at electric power stations. Is that stainless? What about the rotor (not blades)?
Thanks
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looks like this
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/Turbine.jpg
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 10:32:00 -0600, Ignoramus23559

A lot of steam turbines are high cobalt alloys, with titanium, nickel, tungsten, Molybdenum, etc - stuff with names like Nimonic 105, Udimet 720, Haynes 282, etc. Pretty esoteric stuff. Lesser stuff like Hastelloy and Iconel are also used, depending on how hot and high pressure the steam is.
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Thanks,. Color wise, this turbine looks like Inconel MIG wire that I sold recently.
i
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 12:24:38 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I doubt you'll find much, if any, of the more exotic materials in a normal steam turbine. Maybe limited use of some Inconel (nickel) alloys.
--
Ned Simmons

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But what would you find?
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On Tue, 17 Jan 2012 12:52:27 -0600, Ignoramus23559

Like I said in my first post, martensitic stainless steels: 410 and related alloys.
--
Ned Simmons

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On 1/17/2012 12:52 PM, Ignoramus23559 wrote: ...

Depends markedly on what were the operating conditions of the particular turbine and the age (and the two are correlated to some extent; there weren't any supercritical units before the late 50s or so to speak of). The higher pressure/temperature, the more demanding the conditions and the more "exotic" the materials. I'd guess that's from the low-pressure section in the picture, but "low" is still relative depending on the plant design.
You're best source for the turbine in question if you're serious will be to ask the folks holding the auction (assuming that's what's going on here).
--
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On 17/01/2012 19:59, dpb wrote:

I'd have said those were HP or IP blades. As for materials, it depends on the age of the plant, also whether it was fossil or nuclear. If you have more details I could do some fishing.
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Fossil, for sure.
i
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On 19/01/2012 21:06, Ignoramus19378 wrote:

So maybe running at a maximum steam temperature of about 650 C? The following is from a 1971 UK reference, so could be right for recently decommissioned plant.
The usual HP and IP rotor materials were ferritic steels (chrome moly vanadium)which are good for 540 C, with 3% Cr-Mo or 2 1/4% nickel chrome moly for the LP.
Most blading was 12% Chrome moly vanadium steel for strength and creep. The high temperature blades would contain Niobium for improved creep. Nimonics were also used (expensive). LP blading was also 12% chrome moly vanadium, but heat treated for high strength (because these blades are longer and wider). Titanium was used for lacing wires.
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On 1/19/2012 3:06 PM, Ignoramus19378 wrote: ...

The name of the plant would be the best thing to know...it's easy then to know what the cycle conditions are.
Unless it was a supercritical plant, it won't be very exotic at all, though.
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 15:06:32 -0600, Ignoramus19378

The old steam turbine blades I saw in the Carlsbad, CA Encina Power Plant 30ish years ago were something like 30' in diameter. They were fossil, too. (fuel oil powered) The thing was down for PM. The guy said they'd rather take them down early than wait until it threw a fin through the casing after a bearing took its final spin.
-- I have the consolation of having added nothing to my private fortune during my public service, and of retiring with hands clean as they are empty. -- Thomas Jefferson, letter to Count Diodati, 1807
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FWIW, I saw some turbines from a nuclear power plant (Pilgrim?) in a scrapyard once. All the blades had been broken off. The owner didn't know which valuable alloy they were, but it wasn't the same as the rotors.
jsw
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Jim Wilkins wrote:

And I saw four or five 737 engines in a scrapyard.
My first thought was "Is there enough parts to make one good one". Luckily I put that out of my mind quickly...
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Jim Stewart wrote:

Oh, my! Run one of those for ten minutes and your annual (maybe whole decade) fuel budget will go up in smoke! WAYYY too big for personal flying.
Jon
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snipped-for-privacy@wustl.edu says...

Could be fun for a dragster though.
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On 1/18/2012 5:54 AM, J. Clarke wrote:

Some years back, we went the Seattle International Raceway for a special chevrolet day drag race event. Someone had a turbo jet powered dragster there as part of the show. After a bunch of smoke events and short leaps down the raceway, got back to the starting lights and did a real run for the 1/4 mile. Sure didn't take long to get to the end. Quite a show! Never been back as they raised the ticket price.
Paul
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On 1/17/2012 2:17 PM, Jim Wilkins wrote: ...

...
Indeed, virtually any modern turbine will be a mix.
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    I've been wondering this for a while.
    Just out of curiosity -- given your pseudo-username above, why did you miss out on using the fourth rotation/reversal of the same letter, 'q'? That one is your 'b' rotated 180 degrees, or your 'p' flipped left for right. (Just as your 'd' relates to the other two, 180 degree rotation or flipped left for right. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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