What is it? (Amateur version POST03)

Hi,
Here is the third post in the series. I will try to answer questions about
their composition, size and how they can move. Pictures are provide via dro
pbox. I changed the format so that there is one composite image per tool.
POST03_TOOL09
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This tool is metal adn approximately 5 inches long. It produces a hole appr
oximately 1/8 inch in diameter. There is a slide to close or open to fill o
r empty the storage compartment. The spring is a compression spring and req
uires approximately three pounds of force. I have obscured the Patent Numbe
r and the stamped name on the tool as it would be too easy with them shown.
POST03_TOOL10
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This tool is metal and it is approximately twelve inches long. The pinching
ends are shaped like small spoons. When closed, there is still some abilit
y to apply additional pressure but it is not too great as the handles have
some give and there is no mechanical advantage.
POST03_TOOL11
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This tool is metal with rubber/plastic on the handles. It has a latch to ke
ep it closed when not in use. An expansion spring inside one of the handles
forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a cou
ple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring. As
can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed tool
for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner sid
e of one handle.
POST03_TOOL12
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The preserved parts of this tool are iron and are approximately four feet l
ong. It was not well taken care of before I got it and a wooden piece that
fit through the hole had rotted away. It looked to have been a smooth round
pole about three feet long with a diameter to match the hole.
Reply to
leflynn
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Hmm ... with an eighth inch hole, not the usual paper punch. Perhaps something to punch registration holes in negatives where alignment is important -- such as for double-sided printed circuit boards.
Perhaps for holding substances in a flame -- for chemical analysis or something similar.
For cutting sheet metal, with minimal distortion of the workpiece to the left of the cut line.
A post hole digger. Unlike the more common type with two blades hinged and two handles so you drive it down, then spread the handles to close the two blades together to lift out the dirt, this one you press down and walk around it holding the two ends of the wooden handle which sticks through the ring. You lift it out every so often to dump the clods cut free from the hole. I used to have one of these.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
We used fine platinum wire with a small loop in the end to hold samples for flame color tests, since platinum doesn't react or color the flame itself. The loop kept a molten drop in place.
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The wire cost $1.25 at the university bookstore.
-jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Thanks for the informative posts. The answers I have so far are given below .
POST03_TOOL09
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This tool is metal. It produces a hole approximately 1/8 inch in diameter. There is a slide to close or open to fill or empty the storage compartment. The spring is a compression spring and requires approximately three pounds of force. I have obscured the Patent Number and the stamped name on the to ol as it would be too easy with them shown.
This is a VINTAGE McGILL UTILITY PUNCH PATENT #1641521 RAILROAD CONDUCTOR TICKET PUNCHER w/Box like the one pictured here:
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521
POST03_TOOL10
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This tool is metal and it is approximately twelve inches long. The pinching ends are shaped like small spoons. When closed, there is still some abilit y to apply additional pressure but it is not too great as the handles have some give and there is no mechanical advantage.
This is likely a forceps. It looks a lot like the antique Urology Foceps he re
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but it lacks the barbs and is not of good quality stainless steel or nickel . It may be a pair of forceps use in a chemistry lab.
POST03_TOOL11
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This tool is metal with red rubber/plastic on the handles. It has a latch t o keep it closed when not in use. An expansion spring inside one of the han dles forces it back to the open position if not latched. It only requires a couple of pounds of force on the ends of the handles to oppose this spring . As can be seen, there are three pivot points. I find it a well-designed t ool for its use. There is a tool name and manufacturer printed on the inner side of one handle.
This is a Diamond Brand Compound Cutter (Offset left-cut aviation shears). A different brand is pictured here
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POST03_TOOL12
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The preserved parts of this tool are iron and are approximately four feet l ong. It was not well taken care of before I got it and a wooden piece that fit through the hole had rotted away. It looked to have been a smooth round pole about three feet long with a diameter to match the hole.
This tool is an Auger/Post Hole Digger. Two similar ones are shown at
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One poster noted it would be good for clayey soil. And Don shared his perso nal experience.
Reply to
leflynn

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