What is it? (Amateur version Post #15)

Here is another post in my amateur ?What is it?? tool threa
d. As usual, I will try to answer questions about their composition, size a
nd how they can move. Pictures are provided via Dropbox.
L. Flynn
POST15_TOOL57. This metal tool is approximately 10 inches long. The handles
have a rubbery red plastic coating. One handle ends in a jaw with curved p
ortion with a sharp inner edge. There is a further attachment to this jaw w
hich can rotate to create a closed oval shape with sharp inner edges. The o
ther side of this attached piece that has cogs on the outer arc. The size o
f the circle can be decreased by a ratchet action with the motion of the ot
her handle. There is a release that will allow free motion of the rotating
part. I have hidden a name stamped on the tool.
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POST15_TOOL58. On first look this would appear to be a regular screw driver
. However the shaft is split and the width and breadth of the driving end c
an be varied by sliding the movable fitting along the shaft. Moving the fit
ting toward the driving end decreases its breadth and increases its width.
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POST15_TOOL59. This metal tool is approximately 4 inches by 5 inches and co
nsists of four parts: a rigid U-shaped part with cut-away portions near th
e tops of the U; a threaded shaft passing through the bottom of the U; a sm
ooth shaft providing leverage to turn the threaded shaft; and a round toy-t
op-shaped metal piece ending in a point attached to the threaded shaft but
able to spin independently of it. The arms of the U are rigid. The cut-away
portions near the tops of the U would allow it to pass a rectangular piece
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POST15_TOOL60. This plastic and metal tool is a little less than 7 inches l
ong. The working end has a round opening approximately 1 inch in diameter.
The inside of the ring tapers inward and has lightly scored marks parallel
to the shaft of the tool.
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Reply to
Larry Flynn
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Good on you Larry.
I reckon:
57 Conduit or cable cutter
58 Screw holding screw driver
59 Dunno. Cheap flaring tool? Stud setting tool?
60 No idea!
Cheers.
Reply to
Ozzie
Cable cutter
Early screw-holder screw driver
Flaring tool
Brake retainer spring tool
Reply to
clare
ead. As usual, I will try to answer questions about their composition, size and how they can move. Pictures are provided via Dropbox.
es have a rubbery red plastic coating. One handle ends in a jaw with curved portion with a sharp inner edge. There is a further attachment to this jaw which can rotate to create a closed oval shape with sharp inner edges. The other side of this attached piece that has cogs on the outer arc. The size of the circle can be decreased by a ratchet action with the motion of the other handle. There is a release that will allow free motion of the rotatin g part. I have hidden a name stamped on the tool.
er. However the shaft is split and the width and breadth of the driving end can be varied by sliding the movable fitting along the shaft. Moving the f itting toward the driving end decreases its breadth and increases its width .
consists of four parts: a rigid U-shaped part with cut-away portions near the tops of the U; a threaded shaft passing through the bottom of the U; a smooth shaft providing leverage to turn the threaded shaft; and a round toy -top-shaped metal piece ending in a point attached to the threaded shaft bu t able to spin independently of it. The arms of the U are rigid. The cut-aw ay portions near the tops of the U would allow it to pass a rectangular pie
long. The working end has a round opening approximately 1 inch in diameter . The inside of the ring tapers inward and has lightly scored marks paralle l to the shaft of the tool.
Tool58 is a split-tip, holding screwdriver. I have one of those. The purpos e of the split tip is to hold onto a screw, for reaching into recessed plac es or those that otherwise are inaccessible to your fingers for holding the fastener.
Tool59 (two tools) is a flaring tool. It needs a die that holds the end of the tubing being flared. I have a couple of those, too.
Reply to
edhuntress2
I think #57 is a plastic pipe cutter , agree with you on the other 3 .
Reply to
Terry Coombs
Tool 15 looks an awfull lot like a Klein KLT63060 electrical cable cutter to me.
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All trhe others I have in my toolbox. Dad used to have the Klein. Mabee an Iwiss CC-325 -more likely a chinese clone - but DEFINITELY a cable cutter.
Reply to
clare

The missing die threw me.
Reply to
Ozzie
ead. As usual, I will try to answer questions about their composition, size and how they can move. Pictures are provided via Dropbox.
es have a rubbery red plastic coating. One handle ends in a jaw with curved portion with a sharp inner edge. There is a further attachment to this jaw which can rotate to create a closed oval shape with sharp inner edges. The other side of this attached piece that has cogs on the outer arc. The size of the circle can be decreased by a ratchet action with the motion of the other handle. There is a release that will allow free motion of the rotatin g part. I have hidden a name stamped on the tool.
er. However the shaft is split and the width and breadth of the driving end can be varied by sliding the movable fitting along the shaft. Moving the f itting toward the driving end decreases its breadth and increases its width .
consists of four parts: a rigid U-shaped part with cut-away portions near the tops of the U; a threaded shaft passing through the bottom of the U; a smooth shaft providing leverage to turn the threaded shaft; and a round toy -top-shaped metal piece ending in a point attached to the threaded shaft bu t able to spin independently of it. The arms of the U are rigid. The cut-aw ay portions near the tops of the U would allow it to pass a rectangular pie
long. The working end has a round opening approximately 1 inch in diameter . The inside of the ring tapers inward and has lightly scored marks paralle l to the shaft of the tool.
Everybody already got 'em all by the time I saw the list. BUT, I would like for #60 to be a bit narrower and be a wire nut wrench. Klein used to have a screwdriver with such a wrench in the handle, but I haven't seen one in t he store for years. I could use one.
Reply to
rangerssuck
hread. As usual, I will try to answer questions about their composition, si ze and how they can move. Pictures are provided via Dropbox.
dles have a rubbery red plastic coating. One handle ends in a jaw with curv ed portion with a sharp inner edge. There is a further attachment to this j aw which can rotate to create a closed oval shape with sharp inner edges. T he other side of this attached piece that has cogs on the outer arc. The si ze of the circle can be decreased by a ratchet action with the motion of th e other handle. There is a release that will allow free motion of the rotat ing part. I have hidden a name stamped on the tool.
iver. However the shaft is split and the width and breadth of the driving e nd can be varied by sliding the movable fitting along the shaft. Moving the fitting toward the driving end decreases its breadth and increases its wid th.
d consists of four parts: a rigid U-shaped part with cut-away portions nea r the tops of the U; a threaded shaft passing through the bottom of the U; a smooth shaft providing leverage to turn the threaded shaft; and a round t oy-top-shaped metal piece ending in a point attached to the threaded shaft but able to spin independently of it. The arms of the U are rigid. The cut- away portions near the tops of the U would allow it to pass a rectangular p
es long. The working end has a round opening approximately 1 inch in diamet er. The inside of the ring tapers inward and has lightly scored marks paral lel to the shaft of the tool.
ke for #60 to be a bit narrower and be a wire nut wrench. Klein used to hav e a screwdriver with such a wrench in the handle, but I haven't seen one in the store for years. I could use one.
Yes, quick work this time for all four: POST15_TOOL57. Ratcheting copper/aluminum cable cutter POST15_TOOL58. Quick-wedge slotted screw-holding screw driver POST15_TOOL59. One piece of a two piecing flaring tool kit POST15_TOOL60. Brake retaining spring tool
L. Flynn
Reply to
Larry Flynn
Depending on just how deep the sharp part of the blade is, I would guess that it is intended to cut PVC pipe.
This sounds like a screw-starting screwdriver which used to be sold. I've had some, and later got better ones for the purpose. You put the blade in the slot of the screw, slide the collar down until the growing thickness of the blade grips the screw by the slot, and then use it to reach and put the screw where it goes and start it by a turn or two before going to a standard screwdriver for finishing the job.
You're missing some parts. There should be a second assembly with two parallel steel bars, with a set of various sized holes, with ridged IDs. They are split in half to the two parallel steel bars. There is also a countersink on one side for each hole. The two bars are joined with pivots at one end, and the other end has a swinging threaded bar from permanent attachment to one bar and dropping into a slot on the other. There should be a T-handled nut to clamp this over copper (or perhaps steel) tubing. You clamp it with just the right distance projecting, put it in the notches on the arms of the part you have, rotate to lock it in place, and start turning the screw, advancing the cone into the end of the tubing.
The function is to flare the tubing for attaching to a coupling. (You were supposeed to remember to slide the nut on to the tubing first. :-)
Two possibilities come to mind:
1) A wrench for a knurled ring nut similar to those used to attach electronic controls to panels. Common ones are for things like phone jacks, or toggle switches. The knurled OD allows them to be mounted closer together.
2) Or -- it could be a tool to rough and taper the end of a wooden dowel prior to gluing.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
I've had better luck with this style of flaring tool which holds the die centered on the tubing more accurately for the first bell flare:
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It works quite well with NiCopp brake line, a little less well with steel which doesn't want to compress and bell out straight.
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
Wasn't something I ever wished for but remember seeing them too...
Amazon has some versions made to go on 1/4 inch hex drivers:
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Check down the page a little to see some other versions and be sure to read the comments. Some people couldn't get it to work :)
Reply to
Leon Fisk

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