What is it? (Amateur version POST01)

Hi,
I have about 20 tools and will be posting pictures of them.
Let me make it clear that I'm no Rob. I do not know what many of
these tools are or exactly how they are used, so I will rarely provide
answers at the end of the week. I will try to answer questions about
their composition, size and how they can move. Pictures are provide via dropbox.
POST01_TOOL01
The portion of the tool on the left is iron. The part on the right is wood.
This tool was found in a rural area and may have been made to order.
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POST01_TOOL02
The tool is made of metal. The handle is approximately 2 1/2 Feet long. The part
with a rectangular cross-section at the end of the handle has a metal insert inside of the metal outer shell. If you had this tool to experiment with, you would quickly determine its function. It was used in my neighbor's backyard.
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POST01_TOOL03
The tool is made of wood, metal and rubber (the ribbed black part on the left of the PIC01). The parts do not move relative to each other.
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POST01_TOOL04
This tool/part is primarily made of wood. A string is attached to two smooth tapered metal posts on either end.
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Larry Flynn
Reply to
leflynn
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Weather vane made from old gasket scraper.
Lamearse reverse cane.
This one really is a carpet stretcher. the teeth go into the carpet, the rubber base is the pivot point for the stretch.
Venezuelan maraca.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
Homemade boot jack.
Used to push sheetrock up to the ceiling during installation.
Dunno
Dunno
Larry, thanks for your efforts. I always looked forward to Rob's posts.
technomaNge
Reply to
technomaNge
#1 is a prosthetic for the one armed paper hanger you've heard so much about.
#3 is a goose neck webbing stretcher. It is used by upholsterers to tension the jute or rubber webbing that goes under or in place of the springs on a chair seat.
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
POST01_TOOL01 The portion of the tool on the left is iron. The part on the right is wood. This tool was found in a rural area and may have been made to order.
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BUTTERIS FARRIER TOOL A hoof parer used for cutting, trimming, shaving a horse's hooves. The wood en pad was used positioned against the farrier's shoulder. He would apply p ressure by moving his shoulder forward. If you want your own, there are thr ee others for sale on eBay; search Butteris.
POST01_TOOL02 The tool is made of metal. The handle is approximately 2 1/2 Feet long. The part with a rectangular cross-section at the end of the handle has a metal insert inside of the metal outer shell. If you had this tool to experiment with, you would quickly determine its function. It was used in my neighbor 's backyard.
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MAGNETIC NAIL BROOM/SWEEPER. The long part at the end (bottom in use) of the handle contains a magnet. T he tool is used to clean up nails from the ground in the area around where a new roof was installed. It swung close to the ground sweeping over the la wn.
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POST01_TOOL03 The tool is made of wood, metal and hard rubber (the ribbed black part on t he left of the PIC01). The parts do not move relative to each other. The me tal prongs are very sharp.
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GOOSE NECK WEBBING STRETCHER. As I learned from a post (thanks Paul and others), it is used by upholstere rs to tension the jute or rubber webbing that goes under or in place of the springs on a chair seat.
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POST01_TOOL04 This tool/part is primarily made of wood. A string is attached to two smoot h tapered metal posts on either end. The holes are a little over 1/2 inch d eep.
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NO ANSWER. The person I bought it from said it was used with fabric or weaving in some way. I suspect it is a component of a loom or spinning wheel.
Larry Flynn
Reply to
leflynn
With a nudge from a helpful post.... An Axle/Hub for an antique Yarn Winder.
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Larry
Reply to
leflynn

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