What is it? (Amateur version POST02)

Hi,
I have about 20 tools and will be posting pictures of them. Let me make it
clear that I'm no Rob. I do not know what many of these tools are or exactl
y how they are used, so I may not provide answers at the end of the week. I
will try to answer questions about their composition, size and how they ca
n move. Pictures are provide via dropbox.
POST02_TOOL05
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Thit is a complicated metal tool. It has two pairs of pivot points producin
g a large mechanical advantage at the business end. The handles have yellow
and red paint on the tips to distinguish them. The handles also have a loc
king ratchet mechanism that prevents them from loosening until fully closed
and released by a second hard compression. There is an expansion springs b
uilt into the handles to weakly force them open. Between the two pivot poin
t pairs the the are three paris of holes labeled 1, 2 and 3. There are remo
vable pins in the holes. They are in holes 1 and 3 in the first picture. Th
e do not affect the motion.
POST02_TOOL06
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The tool is approximately eight inches long. It is obviously in the pliers
family. It is made of metal with rubber coating on the handles and rounded
business ends. It is unclear whether it is used with force applied to open
or close it as the handles are comfortable for either action.
POST02_TOOL07
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The tool is metal, probably aluminum. The words stamped on it would give it
use away. The metal disks fit into the bottom below the compartment. The m
oveable lever arm puts pressure on the contents of the compartment. The met
al handle fits into a slot in the disks and is used to rotate them.
POST02_TOOL08
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This tool is approximately thirteen inches long. The handle is brass. The w
hite part is shaped stone or cement -- I think it is natural stone. It is p
orous and has small half-moon indentations chiseled into it. The stone is h
elp in place by two nuts.
Larry Flynn
Reply to
leflynn
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Cable crimp tool. Used to crimp either ferrules or other items onto the ends of cables. Interchangeable jaws, the pins allow you to easily ID which jaws are where.
Spark plug boot pliers. Picture of same pliers in different color.
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Ye olde salad shooter... (hand powered food slicer/grinder/shredder) I own the table mounted version with tin cup slicers. They actually work quite well IF they are SHARP..
Reply to
Steve W.
In particular, PIDG crimpers made by AMP for red insulated crimp terminals covering 22 Ga through 16 Ga stranded wire. The red colored handle tip shows that. The second color (yellow) is for a double-layer insulation version of the next size down (26-24 Ga). The older ones were marked 22-16 Ga, but are better restricted to 22-18 Ga, and moving to the blue insulated terminals for 16-14 Ga, and to the crimper with blue and green handle tips.
This one is missing the terminal orientation holder, which mounted via the screw hole in one of the jaws.
The pins and holes are to adjust how thick a wire insulation is crimped by the extended plastic insulation sleeve -- if the terminals are from AMP, they will have a metal liner which is folded back at the entry to offer better pull-out resistance for the insulation grip. (P.I.D.G. stands for "Pre Insulated Diamond Grip", the "diamond" being the shape of the insulation crimp. And on these particular crimpers, one pin is in hole 1, while the other is in hole 3. They should both be in the same numbered hole.
I'm not normally answering these (nor looking at them) because they are a pain as posted, with a number of URLs per item, instead of a single URL to look at images for a number of items. But looking at the quoted comment above, I decided to jump through the hoops to see whether this was an AMP tool, as I suspected by the two pins and three numbered holes.
In any case, you have a good crimper there.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Thanks for all of the informative posts.
POST02_TOOL05 Cable crimp tool. Used to crimp either ferrules or other items onto the en ds of cables. Interchangeable jaws, the pins allow you to easily ID which j aws are where. In particular, PIDG crimpers made by AMP for red insulated crimp terminals covering 22 Ga through 16 Ga stranded wire. The red colored handle tip sh ows that. The second color (yellow) is for a double-layer insulation versi on of the next size down (26-24 Ga). The older ones were marked 22-16 Ga, but are better restricted to 22-18 Ga, and moving to the blue insulated ter minals for 16-14 Ga, and to the crimper with blue and green handle tips. Th is one is missing the terminal orientation holder, which mounted via the sc rew hole in one of the jaws. The pins and holes are to adjust how thick a wire insulation is crimped by the extended plastic insulation sleeve -- if the terminals are from AMP, t hey will have a metal liner which is folded back at the entry to offer bett er pull-out resistance for the insulation grip. (P.I.D.G. stands for "Pre I nsulated Diamond Grip", the "diamond" being the shape of the insulation cri mp. And on these particular crimpers, one pin is in hole 1, while the othe r is in hole 3. They should both be in the same numbered hole.)
POST02_TOOL06 Spark Plug Boot Pliers / Section Pliers. These tools are designed by their manufacturer to remove spark plug cables.
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ml They are also used in pen repair to remove sections from barrels.
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POST02_TOOL07 Tin, Mouli brand Food Shredder. Hand powered food processor. Many are for sale on Ebay if you just have to have your own.
POST02_TOOL08 Brass-handled Pumice Fire Starter. Missing pot. See, for example,Antique 1900's Cast Iron Fire Starter Smudge & Pumice Wand
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Larry Flynn
Reply to
leflynn

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