What is it? Set 441

I need some help with the second last item in this week's set:
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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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2557. ??????
2558. Paddles for measuring out brew ingredients.
2559. Marking gauge - could be used in multiple industries, probably for marking wood.
2560. Foreskin stretcher, too big for the Australian market, maybe West Indies?
2561. ???
2562. Stop or clamp of somesort
Reply to
Dennis
2559 panel marking gauge used by cabinet makers to mark out panels for furniture.
Reply to
Kevin(Bluey)
2557 Could be melting dishes, but their small size leads me to believe that they are bone ash cupels. These are used by assayers to do fire assay of precious metal ores.
The samples would be weighed, wrapped in lead (to help disperse the metals) and placed in one of these cupels. The sample and dish were then heated to about 1000c in an oxidizing atmosphere for an extended period of time. The lead and base metals would oxidize and turn into slag which was absorbed by the bone ash cupel. The precious metals (which don't oxidize readily) would be left as a bb in the in the dish, The weight of the bb divided by the weight of the original sample give you the ratio of the mine assay (usually expressed in troy oz per ton).
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
2557, either ceramic checkers, or maybe mortar, from mortar and pestle. 2558, early dairy farmer's butter spreader. 2559, a marking device. Made to mark / strike a line a certain distance from the edge of a piece of wood. 2560, totally no clue. 2561, be nice to see the inside. The scores on the side appear to be musical scale. Suggests that the item has some to do with music. 2562, familiar, but can't think of what it is.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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I need some help with the second last item in this week's set:
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Rob
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Good answer, this is correct.
Reply to
Rob H.
Thanks, I knew it was a marking gauge but didn't know it was for panels.
Reply to
Rob H.
2560 looks like it might be used for stringing or splicing open-wire telephone or telegraph wires.
Rob H. wrote:
Reply to
Jim Stewart
Last one is a clamp to hold lawnmower blade while loosening the bolt
Reply to
Gerry
Yes, that's exactly what it is.
Reply to
Rob H.
That could be. I did small engine repair, or tried to. I didn't buy all the tools.
Me, I tend to use my shoe, boot, or block of wood.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Last one is a clamp to hold lawnmower blade while loosening the bolt
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
More wisdom and experience, is found on this group.
I some how never bought one of these. Maybe I ought have?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Yes, that's exactly what it is.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2557) Perhaps crucibles for melting precious metals like gold and silver?
2558) paddles for stirring the "mash" in making whisky?
2559) Scriber to mark a line parallel to an edge of a workpiece and at a fixed distance therefrom.
Is there a wedge to hold the cross-piece at a fixed distance?
2560) For gripping something -- but I have no idea what it is to grip.
2561) At a guess, something which hangs from a chain or rope and makes music as it moves.
Wood, so it is not chimes made from a propane tank ro the like.
Perhaps it is made to hold a substance which when heated releases an insect repellent.
2562) Looks as though it is made to clamp a horizontal 2x4 to a vertical one for temporary structures.
Now to post this and find out what others have said.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
2559 - Panel gauge
2561 - String dispenser
Reply to
joeljcarver
You're on the right track but it's not for telephone or telegraph wires.
Still not sure about the wooden item but the rest of the answers can be seen here:
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Reply to
Rob H.
Arrrrgh! We should have known. Art
Reply to
Artemus
2561 - Looks like an early temple block. They were used to keep the monks attention on chants during prayers. This one is a hanging version so it may have been used to call the monks to prayer or to call the attention of the spirits to hear the prayers.
Shinto, Buddhist, Taoist, Confucianism all used similar items.
Reply to
Steve W.
I agree that it's probably something along this line, a couple people have suggested it's some type of musical instrument. I've done some searching but didn't see anything like it, hard to say for sure if it's a temple block or a folk instrument but it does look like it was used for percussion. I sent the owner of it an email asking them to hit it with a drum stick to see what kind of sound it makes. Thanks
Reply to
Rob H.
It isn't a musical instrument really. It was a wooden version of a gong. Made to just kind of thunk when hit with the striker. If you want the correct note try using a small rubber mallet. The correct clapper would have been a silk wrapped wooden ball hanging from the hole in the bottom. There are not a lot of them in the western world and very few are seen outside of the temples they were made for.
The hollow bass thunk you hear in this video is what they sound like
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Reply to
Steve W.

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