What is it? Set 512

This week's set has been posted:
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I might not have access to a computer for the next few days.
Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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2983 No idea, but the combination of a robust head with flimsy, replaceable points confuses and intrigues me.
2984 A garden edger. Offset for use near a wall. A low wall or the user will scrape his knuckles.
2985 Indicator tabs from a cash register.
2988 Power transmission pulley for a flat belt shaft power distribution system.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
2987 Looks like the end pice of a cutter knife
Reply to
Walter Kraft
Rob H.:
Well, 2985 is easy: pop-up displays from a cash register, as were common before rotating digit wheels came into use.
Reply to
Mark Brader
2983: Golf shoe tool? 2984: Shingles remover? 2985: Numbers from a old register? 2986: 2987: end cap for a disposable knife, box cutter, carpet cutter 2988:
Mike in Ohio
Reply to
mungedaddress
2986 Looks like it would be good for shelling oysters.
Reply to
G. Ross
2984 is a shingle removing shovel
2987 is the "ON" setting button for a light timer (the kind you plug into a wall and plug a lamp into)
Rich
Reply to
Rich Hare
2984
Roofing fork a very early one
2985
Number tags from a cash register
2981
Tab from a light timer
Reply to
Markem
I think 2983 is some sort of bookbinder's awl. The points are too far apart for leather stitching, but seems about right for books.
2988 is a flat belt pulley
Paul K. Dickman
Reply to
Paul K. Dickman
2987: I'm pretty sure Rick is correct.
Erik
Reply to
Erik
2984 is a Hay Knife. Used in an old hay mow for cutting/separating loose hay.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
The "modern" version is also used in the fire service. They dig through roots/tangle better than a common round point when digging a fire break. We also have hoes built on the same concept. Work great as long as the operator holds up.
Reply to
Steve W.
2984: I think it might be a SOD spade, as opposed to a hay knife. Maybe... same basic function.
2985: The pop-up number tags from an old mechanical cash register.
2986: I'm not sure what it is, but it's apparently for prying on something with a thin section, and small separation (initially) between it and the working surface. Flat edge gets forced in under, a little prying, then turn the tool and use the fulcrum to pull it out further. Maybe a staple puller, for upholstery work.
2987: I know this thing! It's a push-latching sommat... but can't remember what for!
2988: a crowned pulley for flat belts, probably for an old agricultural machine, maybe even steam-driven. Could be a line-shaft pulley, too, for a water driven shop.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
2983. Electrodes and electrode driver for a moisture meter.
Kevin Gallimore
Reply to
axolotl
2983 probes for testing lumber's moisture 2984 Roofing shovel... old ..
Reply to
woodchucker
2983: Off the top of the head hunch here... perhaps a punch of some sort, possibly for leather work or the like.
Erik
Reply to
Erik
2988 : Line shaft pulley, Split type to allow it to be added to a shaft that was already installed.
Reply to
Steve W.
Posting from my desk top PC in the living room, as always.
2983, scriber for writing parallel lines, scratched into a surface. 2984, corn weeding shovel. Part of the lower handle is missing. 2985, used for roadside alcohol driver testing. 2986, end of a yellow tape measure tape. The other item could be any thing. 2987, I'll admit, you got me. 2988, Part of either a grape press,or cheese press.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Here is a similar "knife" that had a patent:
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Reply to
Leon Fisk
O.K. Well, when you can. :-)
Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always. Where are you all posting from, since this appears on three newsgroups.
2983) Hmm ... if it were smaller and had four pins in line, and had wires connected to each pin, I would know what it is for.
As it is -- I think that it is intended to hold some fairly soft (like meat or potatos) sample for some kind of testing.
Obviously, the points are replaceable, and can be adjusted so both make contact at the same time with a flat surface.
2984) Maybe for digging some plants out by the roots. I don't know.
2985) Either the "cents" part of an old (pre electronic) cash register, or flags used to price produce in bins.
I find it hard to imagine that a cash register would be designed to require 100 flags like this. It should have separate flags for the tens of cents and the units of cents. But I guess that one could have been made like this at one time.
Aha! Perhaps setting price flags in gasoline pumps -- again, pre-electronics.
Too small to be the price set on signs visible from the street.
2986) Does that blade pivot in the vertical part, or is it fixed for pounding on something? The notch sort of looks like a wire stripper, but not quite right, depending on what the other side looks like.
If the blade pivots, it is a lever to adjust the height of something.
2987) I guess that this is one of those common things which I don't normally handle. :-)
2988) Pulley for leather belt drive. Given the size, I think that it might go between a steam tractor as a power source and a large circular saw as in a sawmill.
The crowning is to keep the belt centered. It tends to run to the highest part of the crown.
And one this size is a bit too heavy to do from cast iron as many of them were.
Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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