What is it? Set 520

I need some help with number 3034 this week:
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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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3031: Christmas tree caltrop, for use on sand.
Reply to
J Burns
3035 As all the slots are different sizes, and it is not particularly rugged, and I think I can see different markings near each slot... I'll guess this is a gauge, perhaps a wire gauge.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
Rob H. fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@drn.newsguy.com:
3031 "Caltrops", (a tire puncture trap)
3032 A hose or tubing fitting wrench? 3033 ?? 3034 cable or pipe support to fit tight against a bulkhead... marine duty? 3035 looks to be a checker for the sizes of various washers or o-rings. Hangs on wall, leaves space to fit devices through the slots. 3036 cap piece of the Washington Monument
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
3032 an old basin wrench
Reply to
Markem
3033 Glideslope antenna. Mounted in the nose of an airplane to receive the signal for the glideslope component of the ILS landing system.
Largely superceded by simpler, more efficient antennas these days.
Rich
Reply to
Rich Hare
Rich Hare fired this volley in news:l6l0rq$l1q$1 @dont-email.me:
DAMN! I knew I'd seen one of those inside the nosecone before! (and me, a pilot!...)
And the 'basin' wrench... I knew that name, somewhere in the back of my head.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
3032 A tooth extractor.
Reply to
G. Ross
Caltrop is correct, I didn't know this model was called a Christmas tree.
Reply to
Rob H.
Nope, not a wire gauge
Reply to
Rob H.
Yes
Nope
I was also guessing pipe support but haven't verified it.
That's not it
Good answer!
Reply to
Rob H.
Neither of these
Reply to
Rob H.
3035: 8 slots in one direction and 8 in the other. I wonder if it was used to check coins, particularly where coins from more than one nation were in circulation. If you can't read what's stamped on the coin, you see which slot fits the thickness and diameter. If you can read it but think it may be counterfeit, you check the size with the gauge, then weigh it.
Reply to
J Burns
The OSS used to drop them from airplanes in WWII.
Reply to
J Burns
Glideslope antenna is correct, model 37P-4.
Reply to
Rob H.
Correct, it's also known as a dental tooth key.
Reply to
Rob H.
Very good, you are correct that it was used to check coins, though your guesses on how it was used are not in agreement with the patent.
Reply to
Rob H.
3031. A caltrop. From the size and design, this one is for use against rubber-tired vehicles.
3032. Porter's key for opening upper bunks on a train?
3035. Part of a Brannock Device.
Reply to
Mark Brader
Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3031) I've never seen a sheet metal caltrops before, but that is obviously what it is. (Something initially to halt mounted military charges.) These would probably do a nice job of slicing open tires.
3032) At a guess, something to plug into a removable plate (e.g an access plate for shutoff valves), turn to lock the handle to the plate, and lift it out.
3033) Assuming that what is behind it is a mirror reflection, I see what appears to be a Type-N RF connector, which suggests that this is either a delay line, or a quarter-wavelength or half-wavelength stub for something like an antenna.
3034) Hmm ... no size on this. If the notches for the pipes formed a horizontal line, I would suggest that this is part of a cattleguard (placed in a recess in a gateway. Cattle won't cross it, but a vehicle can drive right over it.
But -- since they are forming a slightly concave shape, I think that it perhaps forms a bench for outdoors use. Pipes go in the notches, and the base fastens to a flat surface. Looks like a few too many mounting holes compared to what I think that it needs.
3035) Looks too thin to be an adjustable height support for shelves, so I don't really know.
3036) Again -- no size. And slotted head screws are made in all kinds of sizes.
But the grounding cable terminal looks fairly large -- say at least for 1-0 wire. And it looks as though the terminal has been soldered to the spike, which suggests that it is probably not steel.
So, I'm going to say that this is intended to attract lightning away from other adjacent things, and to ground it. Certainly not the shape of the already ancient lighting rods which I knew in South Texas back in the 1950s, but the shape should suffice for the purpose, and those screws allow the spike to be replaced if it gets partially melted by a heavy strike.
Now to post and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols

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