What is it? Set 523

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3052: Looks like a telephone installers tool for crimping the small circular connectors used when splicing POTS lines.
Reply to
Scott Lurndal
3050: an old radio/wireless receiving loose coupler The box part has a tapped coil, and another tapped coil slides out of it to adjust coupling between the two.
Northe
Reply to
Northe
That looks like an entry for the flat two wire cable that ran from a roof top antenna to the television The flat slit would accommodate that type antenna wiring. The opening seals critters out.
Reply to
Leon
Another wild guess. 3050. I think this might be a spooling drum for light (IE. not heavy) cable. Possibly used for temporary telecomms (military unlikely), detonation of charges in mines/quarries etc. Back to the drawing board. Nick.
Reply to
Nick
3049-Reminds me of what I'd expect to find at the bottom of a control column for an old airplane, or similar. Of course, I was unable to verify that I'm even close. -Bill
Reply to
Bill
To show that I'm flexible, 3049 may have some features in common with a master-cylinder (for braking) too. There is something "hydraulic" about it.
Reply to
Bill
I saw that. Kinda funny that they only needed ONE wrench for the whole wagon back then? Can you imagine calling something a Car Wrench nowadays ;-)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
"Leon Fisk" wrote
Well, it is a bit fun to compare times (and technology) of old to a modern counterpart. But it does make sense. Back in the day, many parts were made by the village blacksmith. And what manufacturers existed, I am sure there was not a great variety in parts, fasteners, bolts, etc. It would not have been smart to have a bunch of different size nuts (or bolts) on a wagon.
After all, where are bolts (and/or nuts) used on a wagon. Not being overly familiar with wagon (or carriages) I would assume that the wheel and hitch would be the only places where such a connector would have been needed. This is not high tech. I mean, the highest tech thing on that wagon, was the wheels. That is pretty low tech. I don't think that you need a full socket set and a torque wrench for that.
So it does make sense. Having known a couple blacksmiths, I have a full appreciation on how these guys at one time were the primary engineers-problem solvers-tool makers in the community. They may not be doing all that kind of work any more. But any blacksmith does have to be a bit creative to do their job. And they were involved in making wagons, even in just a supportive role.
Not bitching at you or anything. It IS interesting that it would be called a wagon wrench. But that was a much simpler time. You did not need that many tools to work on a wagon. Modern vehicles a a much different situation. How much does a modern mechanic spend on tools? Particularly if purchased from the professional suppliers.

Reply to
Lee Michaels
Just to be picky, nowadays, for a car, there is only one tool needed or useful to the typical owner... a cellphone to call a tow. And for some cars, not even that is needed with cars that call for help by themselves.
I'll admit that sometimes a credit card is needed to scrape the ice off the windshield.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
If I'd though of it, that would have been my guess. So I looked it up. Flat cable was supposed to be kept away from metal, but apparently masonry wasn't a problem. The usual method was to drill a hole, put the cable through, and caulk.
Cable was supposed to have a drip loop at the entrance. If it were designed for TV cable, I would expect it to deflect the cable down on the exterior side.
Reply to
J Burns
I pulled the identical device, still in the original package, from my loft. It is a Radio Shack Archer Cat. No. 15-1200 Wall feed through tube. "Designed to provide a neat weather-proof entrance of all types of wire and cable through walls up to 13" (33cm) thick."
It includes the rubber grommet with the slit. "Note. Rubber grommet should be used only when absolutely necessary in UHF installations. Some air circulation is desirable to prevent condensation.".
I can take measurements and pictures, if necessary, but both external plastic parts are identical to the pictures.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Drahn
Paul Drahn fired this volley in news:l8dib0$tqi$1 @dont-email.me:
AH! I thought it was a "Palmetto Pee-hole". It's actually an "SC Sex Aid"!
You'll get'm every time with that "grommet with the slit". They couldn't possibly resist!
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I wondered what it was designed for. I'm curious about the exterior side. It appears to have a couple of holes to screw something on.
If it were well designed, I would expect a downward elbow on the exterior, to keep water out while allowing some air circulation.
The homeowner obviously bought the fitting at Radio Shack, but if the carport roof abutted the house, it would be hard to bring an antenna cable down to that point. The best entry point would have been under the eaves, leaving the shortest possible length of flat cable exposed to sun and rain.
A tube from the basement to the carport would be ideal if he had a compressor in his basement and sometimes needed compressed air in his carport.
Reply to
J Burns

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