What is it? Set 535

I need some help with 3122 and 3126 in this week's set:
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Rob
Reply to
Rob H.
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3124 This is a Necker Knob. It clamps on to a car steering wheel, so that the driver can steer with one hand while the other hand is otherwise occupied. They sort-of faded into obscurity with the introduction of power steering. Truck drivers have also occasionally used them.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
3121 This is a four-terminal resistor. It is used in precision measurement. The current goes in and out through the large outer terminals, and voltage is measured across the puny inner terminals. This separates the effect of voltage drop across the current terminals from the true voltage at the inner terminals.
Reply to
Alexander Thesoso
Posting from my desk top PC in the living room, as always. Windows XP is getting old, some help wanted web sites won't upload resume with this OS.
3121, fixed value resistor, for testing equipment. 3122, my gut sense is this is a lens for movie camera. 3123, be interesting if the solid end was open socket of some kind. Not familiar. 3124, fence repair tool. Turn the black knob to tighten the two straps to hold the fence wire. 3125, fence repair tool. Clips off the ends of fence posts and catches the pieces. 3126, maybe burner gun from a natural gas furnace?
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
This is the combination wrench/handle of a cleaning rod for a semi-automatic military rifle or machine gun. The wrench end is for removing the gas piston for cleaning also. Don't know for which one exactly as there is a lot of similarity between them.
Reply to
NamPhong
Very common where I grew up. All work trucks had them.
They were called suicide knobs. Because people would get their shirt sleeves tangled up in them and crash their vehicle.

Reply to
Lee Michaels
That is what they were called where I grew up too. When I was in school an automotive store that I worked for part time sold them with the newer material called Lucite. LOL
Reply to
Leon
3121: Part of a telegraph system? 3122: Part of a camera zoom / blow up system 3123: wrench, but for what? 3124: suicide knob? 3125: Crimpers, but for what? 3126: tip of a gas burner?
Reply to
mungedaddress
At the age of ten I was driving all sorts of vehicles on the farm. One was an old three ton truck, manual everything. I had to hold on to the suicide knob with both hands to turn the wheel when the truck was stopped or moving slowly in bullow.
A bit more info.
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LdB
Reply to
LdB
3121 A fence tool. 3122 A fence tool. 3123 A fence tool. 3124 A fence tool. 3125 A fence tool. 3126 A fence tool.
A tense fool.
Reply to
shazzbat
Thanks. First time in days I've laughed out loud. Very well done, my friend.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Thanks! After doing some searching I'm pretty sure it's for an M14.
Reply to
Rob H.
Resistor is correct.
Reply to
Rob H.
Yep
I would guess this is right but I don't know for sure.
The solid end doesn't have an open socket, this tool is automobile related.
Reply to
Rob H.
Good one! Though believe it or not I didn't post a single fence tool this week.
Reply to
Rob H.
Rob H. wrote in news:lf9dp601r02 @drn.newsguy.com:
3125 is a nut cracker.
Reply to
Larry
The wrench has a visible part no. K-D 3282 and google search reveals that it is a weighted wrench for adjusting the timing belt tension on a chrysler engines.
See picture with description
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-jim
Reply to
jim
Posting from the usenet newsgroup rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
3121) A current-measuring shunt resistor.
The current is applied to the two large binding posts and goes directly into the ribbon of metal.
The two small binding posts are connected to the ribbon via what appears to be spot welds (the small wires about an inch from each large binding post).
The position of the spot welds is to set a precise resistance so you have a precise voltage across the small binding posts for a given current.
Most current shunts are for 50 mV at the full rated current, but this looks like a significantly larger resistance for the current capability of the metal ribbon and thus a higher voltage. It might be as high as 1V at fullrated current, which suggests that it was also used in circuits with relatively high voltages.
3122) This looks like part of an early and special purpose color TV camera. Each lens focuses onto a different B&W videcon, through a different color filter, and the different apertures are to balance out the relative light loss in the filters.
If the lenses were larger and more widely spaced, I would think that it was an early projection TV -- back when there were three different CRTs, each with a different color phosphor.
At a guess, this was for converting movie film to video tape.
3123) This looks like a throttle lever for a multi-engine aircraft.
3124) A "Necker's Knob". It clamps onto a steering wheel allowing the driver to steer with a single hand, while the other arm is around his girlfriend.
They were common in the 1950s and maybe the early 1960s.
These were reputed to be rather dangerous in use.
3125) No real idea. A second view might help. It sort of looks like there is a half cylinder behind the jaws to hold something. if the teeth were staggered, I would think that it might be to perforate something. It might be for something like breaking a poker chip in half.
3126) Strange. It at first looks like a flash hider for a weapon, except that the part which would slide over the barrel is occupied by something else, which sort of looks like a wrench for removing some part of the same weapon (the hex hole).
The color looks like Army battle gear of some sort.
But I *think* that is is some kind of flame torch. The fuel is put into a part in the hex hole, which squirts the fuel into the tube, where it is ignited. The holes surrounding the end feed in more air to increase the burning rate near the point of exit.
Perhaps part of a flame thrower.
Now to post this and then see what others have suggested.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
This is correct.
Reply to
Rob H.
Good job, you nailed it.
Reply to
Rob H.

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