What is the proper lubricant for a four jaw chuck

such as burnerd.
thanks
photos at 11.
Reply to
Ignoramus4323
Loading thread data ...
I have a medium grease - from a grease gun... fill the chuck. It is intended to keep chips out or keep them on the outside ring. Also plenty to move about in the guides the teeth of the jaws move in.
That way on my metal and wood chucks.
If you use cutting fluid or some spray... it might 'melt' some of it out so another reason for a full body.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
formatting link

Ignoramus4323 wrote:
----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
formatting link
The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Good lord! If you spin the lathe fast, the entire room will be painted with the stuff! There are some enclosed chucks that can handle this, like for pure CNC turning centers, but they cost ten grand!
I use a light oil, wiped on with a rag, when I fully disassemble and clean my chucks. This only slings a few drops first time you start up.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Elson
here are a coupla old posts I archived:
"My choice (for lubricating lathe chucks) is Dow Corning G-N Metal Assembly Paste. It is a light bodied grease loaded with moly graphite and other solid lubes. A very thin film on the scroll and other friction surfaces makes for a very smooth action that lasts a long time. All chucks eventually have to be taken apart to remove chips but the thin lube film causes minimal build up."
-- "I have used Molykote GN Metal Assembly paste for years with good results. It is loaded with extreme pressure solid lubricant particles in a light grease base. A thin coat over all the bearing surfaces lasts a long time and doesn't attract chips. It is also available as an aerosol spray. It is pricey but worth it IMHO as it lasts a long time."
Grant
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Wow, everyone will have ideas. At work our cnc chucks are lubed with black moly based grease. For an engine lathe chuck. a drop of oil in the right places works for me.
Oil/grease does two things. Lubricates and attracts stuff. A secondary effect is that that centrifugal effects tosses it places.
So to cut to the chase, lube lightly with something, and clean debris that is atracted periodically.
Wes
-- "Additionally as a security officer, I carry a gun to protect government officials but my life isn't worth protecting at home in their eyes." Dick Anthony Heller
Reply to
Wes
I lubed it with moderate amount of medium nondrying oil. Thanks to all.
Reply to
Ignoramus14593
My chucks are enclosed. I have one 4 jaw for my wood lathe that is bare bones - and it gets dusted and sometimes oil if it is to sit.
Martin Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
formatting link

J>
----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==----
formatting link
The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
My prefered coolant is high sulpher cutting oil...I dont have those problems.
Though..I do have some nifty Tshirts......
Reply to
Gunner
On Wed, 02 Jul 2008 19:57:14 -0400, with neither quill nor qualm, Wes quickly quoth:
Maybe put a newspaper catcher around it and spin it up to full speed right after lubing to catch most of the centripetal toss?
(That word change ought to get things going around here. ;)
-- Such is the irresistible nature of truth that all it asks, and all it wants, is the liberty of appearing. -- Thomas Paine
Reply to
Larry Jaques

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.