Where can I get a wrench like this?

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The thing with the circle drawn around it was being used in Germany to
straighten Micrometers as part of the repair process. Does anyone know what the
proper name for this puppy is? Where to buy one?
Thanx,
plh
Reply to
plh
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The proper name for this is "ugly completely unusable image" and what I suggest is you work a little harder at getting something that doesn't look like an image off a broken radar screen ..
GWE
Reply to
Grant Erwin
Looked like a reasonable image to me, perhaps the problem is on your end.
Grant Erw>plh wrote:
jk
Reply to
jk
Are you sure that it's a wrench and not a hand vise?
Reply to
RAM^3
It looked rather clear to me. Not a great scan, but legible nevertheless.
Abrasha
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Reply to
Abrasha
Might not be a wrench - but a clamp. Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
plh wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Micrometers? Are you nuts? This is more for the brutal job. But also, there might be smaller variants.
We call it "Franzose" (Frenchman), the French call it "Clee Anglais" (English wrench) and the English call it "French key".
Does that help?
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
I found another name: Adjustable spanner.
Here is a better picture (in German)
The name "Rollgabelschlüssel" they used for is not right. But, the also named it "Franzose".
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
Believe it or not, yes. It's used to straighten the frame. You have to be pretty brutal to bend a micrometer frame, but it happens. When it is close enough you lap in the carbide contacts.
Nothing turned up on Google, but thanks, it's a start. -plh
Reply to
plh
Ah! That's what I use the wrench for. Straigten or bend weldings, flat iron, etc. _Very_ good for the job. I love the tool for to do things like that. Mine is quite old (I guess at least 50 years).
I thought you want to do turn some screws on the micrometer. :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
Nope! It's on my end as well.
Bob Swinney
Reply to
Robert Swinney
The right side seems to black and non-descript - might be jaws or who knows what.
Seems to me it appeared to be a Jewel makers gripping vice just maybe.
Martin Martin Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net NRA LOH, NRA Life NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder
Abrasha wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
I have one. They are eastern european. My sister got me one in Checkoslovakia about 12 years ago.
In Prague they use it as the symbol for a car repair shop.
After trying to use it I can tell you it is the single most useless wrench I have ever owned.
It barely fits anywhere under a car and tends to slip off and bark your knuckles at any opportunity.
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
I just posted a pile of photos of the wrench I have.
Go to the
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dropbox
and look for the files that start with Czech_wrench
Reply to
Ernie Leimkuhler
Is this to express they are rubbish? ;-) They are known and used in Europe. Call it "old europe", if you want.
Not just there. I remember to have seen it in Austria, Germany and I would not wonder in many more central europe countries. It was (or is) used by the local variants of AMA to signal where you can get help for your car. But, that tools is going out of use. You already learned why. :-)
No use there. But do you remember the times when there was plenty of room under the hood of any car? I use the spanner for plumbing work sometimes, and most for the kind of jobs the OP needs it for. For that, it really is excellent. Also as an hammer.
Oh, and if it slips off, you are using it in the wrong direction.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Müller
As a child I thought my grandfather's micrometer looked much like a child-sized C-clamp. Needless to say, it required some repair, and I required some fast education about which tools were for generating force and which were for measuring. (My grandfather had incredible anger control.)
I believe it only required lapping to return it to accuracy, but the lesson was learned. I believe that it was about this time (maybe 8 years old) that I was set to making one-inch cubes from bar stock with a hacksaw, files, micrometer and try-square -- no light under the try-square and closer to the zero-tenth vernier than to either the .0001 or .0009 mark. I also learned that both files and hacksaws (if new and sharp) were effective metal working tools -- lessons I try to pass along to new generations. -- --Pete "Peter W. Meek"
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Reply to
Peter W. Meek
Hello Nick, Thanks so much for that information. I found that site, and a related site for Kalmar Tools, but unfortunately they are all in German (Ich onhe eine kleine verstanden kann!) and they don't seem to be going for an international presence. If anyone knows of a site where I can order online in English, I'd appreciate it! But I bet if I just call them up, someone on that end will speak English (after being amused by my halting German). We had a German exchange student who said that in Germany if you can't speak English everyone considers you uneducated. Thanks Again! -plh
Reply to
plh
A friend in Wales had a wrench similar to this (basically what we call a "Monkey Wrench" in the US, but you turn the handle to close it up, not a separate knurled roller. His was made by a company called "King Dick" (I'm serious). He inherited it from his father, and had not seen one like it in years. It was a great tool, because you can continually tighten it while you apply torque, so it's less likely to round off the corners of a fastener. His was around 10" long. I've always wanted one.
Reply to
Bob Chilcoat
King Dick are still in business
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. I have quite a few King Dick tools. A lot of people laugh the first time they see them. Most of the King Dick range are very good. Their only product I have a slight complaint about is the adjustable wrench - the tolerances aren't quite tight enough.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
King Dick are still in business
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. I have quite a few King Dick tools. A lot of people laugh the first time they see them. Most of the King Dick range are very good. Their only product I have a slight complaint about is the adjustable wrench - the tolerances aren't quite tight enough.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy

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