Wiring a 50 amp 4 conductor 220V single phase plug with tray cable

I often times get a full 124 VAC..which means my 220 runs at nearly 250 volts. Since the VFD on my mill goes into alarm at 234 volts..I cant run it occasionally.
Pacfic Greed and Extortion is my power company.
I am the Sword of my Family and the Shield of my Nation. If sent, I will crush everything you have built, burn everything you love, and kill every one of you. (Hebrew quote)
Reply to
Gunner Asch
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564 > =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 (too) near Washington D.C. |
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=A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero =
Reply to
Denis G.
Interesting! I've not worked with SMDs so I had not realized the system that they used. Looks like 10% values represented by a letter, followed by a digit as the exponent for the multiplier.
Why?
BTW I remember once (on graveyard shift) having a "planner" (glorified stock clerk) looking all over for a RC20GF007J. When he expressed doubt that such a thing existed (after some time looking), I showed him a (hand painted) RC42GF007J. He knew how the color codes translated into the part number -- but had no idea what they meant. :-)
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
My guess is that they restored the site from an out of date backup, since those were the last items added to the site. Either that, or they were deleted because some idiot claimed they were spyware or something. I had one idiot claim that the javascript that set the copyright date was spyware, even though it only reads the copyright date from a file on the server and prints it on the bottom of the screen.
I had another 'free' personal website on Earthlink that lost almost everything more than once, so I just deleted it. I am looking into paid hosting for my collection of manuals & schematics.
No surprise there. I went through that with assemblers, too. Luckily, purchasing had done a decent job of buying only printed values on leaded 1% resistors. Only older stock had color codes.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Carbon or metal?
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I've seen 110 common - stepping up to 130.
It is my opinion that the higher voltage is used to deliver higher wattage over the same current limited wire.
So when the current limit (don't want to have hot wires that sag do you) is hit, either additional lines are brought in or the voltage is stepped up.
I myself have 1500 foot of Two phase - Three phase is on the highway, I get two high lines and two single line drops (odd both on the same line) one for the shop and another for the house.
I could convert the shop or build another and have it 3-phase - if I pay for the transformer drop and such. Inverted V is the term - a three phase delta that has a 'missing' leg - the other two generate the three voltages.
Delta - Delta transformers are used on high important or danger poised locations. e.g. firehouses, police stations, hospitals.
If a winding is lost or a leg - the secondary will be generated but at 2/3 power from the normal.
Lots of motors are two phase - milk houses and farms are run that way.
The local substation runs three sets of two phase - taken from two sets of three phase - and routes them down both sides of the highway and down another major backbone. Mine are a branch off the highway.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufk> >>> John,
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
Sputter, sputter.... I'm not sure!?!
Reply to
Denis G.
[...]
I've been told we do the same in the UK for 240V to 110V construction site safety isolation transformers. The centre tap is grounded so if someone does contact a phase the worst they get is a 55V shock.
Reply to
David Billington
If everything in the UK is 240v, why are 110v transformers needed? Does the UK buy so many power tools from the US that they have to run construction sites on the US standard or something?
Reply to
J. Clarke
Thanks for playing, "EE". Better luck next time! ;-)
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
All normal domestic tools and appliances are 240V but it's mandated that 110V tools be used on building sites for electrical safety reasons, nothing to do with the popularity or otherwise of US tools. The 110V being delivered in the same manner as US domestic 240V, but in this case being 55V either side of ground. IIRC 50V and lower is considered low voltage so a shock from either side of the site 110V supply only results in a 55V shock so not likely harmful.
What's the situation on US building site, the same or are the tools powered from the usual 110V supply.
Reply to
David Billington
Portable tools are 120V with a grounded cord, or are double insulated with no metal to metal connection between the motor and the frame. It's been that way for 50 years or more.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
All the tools are, ahem, 120V. ;-) Like DoN 'splained, there's a white neutral and the two ends of a 240VCT transformer. Sometimes people erroneously refer to the two legs of the 240 as "phases," But they're not - they're just the two ends of a center-tapped transformer secondary.
Except for 240V appliances, like the range and dryer, everything in the USA is 120V. Or, sometimes they say 115; I've even heard 117, but nobody's called it 110 in decades. :-)
Cheers! Rich
Reply to
Rich Grise

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