anti-oil to increase friction?

I have a monitor stand which droops. There is a rod about 6mm dia which
is in mounted two plain bearings with spring steel inserts - is there
some sort of anti-lube which will make them stickier?
They have to move a bit so anything gluey won't work, and it will have
to be very fluid to get into the bearings.
thanks,
-- Peter Fairbrother
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
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Engineeing as she is spoke ...
If it moves, and it shouldn't, use Duck Tape. If it doesn't move, and it should, use WD40.
As you're caught between two stools, dissolve some Duck tape into WD40? :-)
Reply to
gareth
..
..
I needed some kilopoise grease a while back, and failed to find a UK source at a sensible price for the small quantity I needed. I eventually tracked down some "damping grease" which worked fine from a far eastern supplier. Took a week or two to arrive, but cost just a couple of pounds including c arriage. Company was called Deal Extreme. Easy to find using google.
Mike
Reply to
miked.crossfield
Thanks all, but I don't think that's the sort of stuff I need.
I need something to increase sticktion, not moving friction,.
A kilopoise grease would not do this - indeed, it is designed do the reverse, increasing and smoothing moving friction, while decreasing stiction.
-- Peter Fairbrother
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother
How about rosin, there are little hard cakes available for string instrument players, and there used to be a softer type sold to bowlers.
Reply to
unk
In article , Peter Fairbrother writes
Peter,
This is a completely off-the-wall suggestion, but....
As an ex-chemist, I loathe having sticky fingers, and have continued to be something of a compulsive hand washer. Most things have to be washed off straight away, but the most unpleasant one (to me) is chocolate. It seems to make the skin have substantially higher friction when the fingers are rubbed together. I must admit I'd be astonished if it did what you wanted it to do, but you never know (and it might smell quite nice!).
Actually, I can't recall - if you ever said - the exact circumstances in which you need to do this. I assume any kind of abrasive is a complete no-no. Have you considered trying one of the weakest of the retainers - Loctite 222 nutlock, IIRC. Maybe you could experiment by weakening it still further with some inert filler.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
In article , David Littlewood writes
Another thought just occurred to me. How about the rosin which is used by violin players to increase the friction on their bows, and I believe by gymnasts to improve their grip on poles and the like.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
In article , David Littlewood writes
Another though - having gone back and read what you need to do - what about tapping holes (at least 3) round the bearings and putting nylon screws in, or, probably better, steel grub screws with nylon inserts in their ends. These could be adjusted to give the amount of friction you need.
David
Reply to
David Littlewood
You know when you do a temporary bodge-job, you sort of leave the main job undone - I propped it up with a notebook, the paper kind.
Today I wanted to use the notebook, so I cleaned the bearings on the monitor stand and unlubricated them with rosin dissolved in isopropyl alchool.
Note, that is very very sticky stuff to work with!
Anyway, it seems to work, at least for now. I was a little surprised, I hadn't expected it to, but so far so good. :)
-- Peter
Reply to
Peter Fairbrother

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