Bench Top Spark Eroder

I've just acquired a small bench top spark eroder in need of some TLC
(at the very least). The label proclaims
"Walton Electronics Ltd 'Arc-out', 240 volts"
I don't suppose that anyone has a similar item or has any guidance to
the set up and usage of this type of equipment?
Thanks
Charles
Reply to
Charles Ping
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Charles,
Send me a photo - I suspect that is the same model that I ebayed last year before my abortive house move
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Thanks Andrew
Here's a photo
formatting link
Charles
Reply to
Charles Ping
guidance
Yes that is exactly the same model. A very simple system using water dielectric in a total loss sytem, and the buzzer principle to control the electrode rather than a servo and hv generator.
The weight of the electrode and its mount extend a spring until the circuit is completed between the electrode and the work. At this point current flows through a solenoid coil surrounding the electrode mount, which is pulled upwards by magnetic attraction. This movement breaks the circuit, and the back emf of the coil as the magnetic field collapses creates a spark that does the errosion. As the coil is no longer energised the electrode falls again under gravity and the cycle repeats.
The electrode is a thin walled copper tube, and an electrolyte reservoir fixed on top of the machine releases water slowly though it to flush away the eroded material and keep it cool.
Good for removing small broken taps or knocking holes in hacksaw blades but not much else. The sparking conditions that this type of eroder creates are carefully avoided in diesinking types of EDM machines by significantly complex electronic monitering systems.
AWEM
Reply to
Andrew Mawson
Used that model before to save my ass on a few occasions!
We always made our electrodes solid at the business end with a cross hole just under the threaded section to allow the water to dribble down the outside.
I'd like one myself oneday, just in case!
Wayne....
Reply to
Wayne Weedon
Thanks Andrew and Wayne (and yes Wayne - I also acquired it to save my ass when needed) I'll give it a good clean and see if it works at the weekend. I may well be back with more questions.
Charles
Reply to
Charles Ping
Camden Books has two books about building a EDM. This one is the primitive version: "Build a Metal Disintegrator".
lists 3 Books about EDM. The first one is the one noted above, then directly following a more complex (stepper, electronics etc) and then a how-to.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Thanks Nick
I'd forgotten about that one. There was also a design for a simple one in Model Engineer's Workshop a couple of years ago.
Charkes
Reply to
Charles Ping
There's a good exposition of a home-built EDM at the superb and remarkable Model Engine News site at .
Hth,
Reply to
Boo
Do have both booklets. I bought them out of curiosity. The primitive one (it is, and it isn't a blame to call it primitive) is just a vibrator (for engraving) and a bit of perspex and steel, transformer and a rectifier (IIRC). Ideal for tap disintegration. If you want, I can describe it a bit more.
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Thanks. Makes me want to make one.
It did. :-)
Nick
Reply to
Nick Mueller
Thanks for the offer Nick but I think that I'll have a play this weekend and see how it goes
Charles
Reply to
Charles Ping

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