Metric 'thou'?

A thousandth of an inch is clearly a useful unit. While I'm just old enough to have been brought up using both imperial and metric, many of
the people I work with a much younger.
Does anyone here know what units are taught in schools now regarding tolerances and other small measurements?
Thou? Decimal millimetres only? Micron? Some new unit similar to a thou?
Just a thought,
Dave
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I'd be surprised if metal working is taught to that level these days.
I'll ask one of my DT teaching colleagues tomorrow and report back.
Brian
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Speaking as someone who has been doing DT/Tech for 8 years and just dropped it - we were never taught *anything* with regard to tolerances and that is up to GCSE level (14-16). Speaking with friends who are currently taking it at A-level (16-18) I have yet to see mention of it....
For those curious as to the reasons for me dropping it - I felt it was too based around Art and Design and lots of time playing around with drawings and rendering rather than actually getting your hands dirty. (And of course it is hard to get excited about a small display stand when your building submarines <g> )
HTH,
Michael
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in message

From my experiences as an engineering NVQ assessor and IV, metric is the norm for all the lads, none of which seem to understand imperial, sadly !! Tolerances dont seem to enter into the younger lads minds or work. It's not until you get to the Level 3 lads who run and set CNC in the workplace. I have to say, some of my lads amaze me with the complex things they set up and machine on CNC mills. And I mean set up and program, not just call up a pre written programme from the machine's memory .
I also understand why you gave up, there is as you say, more emphasis on paperwork, dates and signatures. I am far more happier when a lad gets stuck into a job and produces something other than drawings. Having said that, I'm even more happier in my never ending loss making workshop !!! Bob

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Michael wrote:

In English schools there is a strand of DT that puts the design in front of the technology and has the exam title Design Technology: Product Design. With the exam board I work with this exam comes with two streams - 3D Design and Textiles; it is concerned with how a product looks - not how it functions. There is another strand that has the emphasis the other way round. Design and Technology: Systems and Control Technology. This puts the technology first and is concerned with how things work (pneumatics electronics structures and mechanisms).
Design and Technology: Food Technology is the third member of the suite.
I am principal moderator for 'A' level SCT and am in the middle of the exam season just now.
Yesterday I was in a school looking at a project where the student had set himself (they are usually male but not exclusively) the task of measuring the speed of rotation of a shaft. He had built a test rig of a nicely turned shaft mounted in bearings that he had specified and sourced. All made to tolerance which are detailed in his design folder. No CNC work either - manual lathe and miller. The bulk of his work was obviously the electronics involved in measuring each rotation but he did understand and had worked to tolerances. Another centre had a young lady who had prototyped a system to monitor the pitch of a planes propeller. She had modeled the pitch mechanism complete with a 600mm diameter prop. Very fine work in more than one sense.
These were unusual on two fronts - the vast majority of the work I see is purely electronic as opposed to electro-mechanical or pure mechanically based and the Product Design exam has roughly ten times as many entries as us. Food outnumbers us about three to one.
At exam time DT teachers have the freedom to go down the design or the technology path. For the less technically minded teacher whose Head is demanding exam successes the Product Design route is very appealing. Working to a tolerance does not figure very highly when your primary materials are card, MDF and acrylic.
In my experience tolerances would be most likely to be taught in a school taking the technology route and would probably be in association with electronic component values e.g. resistors.
I dont know enough about vocational courses, particularly Post 16, to comment but I do know the local Tech. still has a suite of lathes and milling machines that get well used - but the department is a shadow of its former self.
To answer the original post - exclusively metric measurements (there's a long battle with Maths and Science - in my school DT used mm. while they insisted on teaching cm.) and hundredths would be demonstrated but rarely used. I liked to get a micrometer out and show a class that we could easily measure the diameter of a human hair or the thickness of a piece of paper. Awesome was heard during one such demonstration.
Its education Jim but not as we know it.
John B
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Meter, millimeter, micrometer (micron), nanometer (as in nano-technology, one of the most promising of sciences). Dirk, Netherlands
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I'm surely talking to myself. In this respect I never heard about "thou-technology". What on earth is an "inch"? Dirk
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A misspelled itch?
Oh, not that? So it must be this: 1 inch = 25,4 mm
--
mvh Uffe



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LOL. Then a "thou" must be 0,0254 mm. Why should this be "clearly a usefull unit", I wonder ;-) Dirk
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An imperial inch is 25mm exactly.
A metric inch however, is only 25mm.
:-)
Hywel
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My weak joke didn't come even out right...
Meant to say, imperial inch is 25.4, but the "new" metric inch is 25mm exactly.
Sorry, I'll get my coat.
I'll have to try this on the letters page of the Daily Mail saying it's the new Euro-inch. Bet they publish it.
Hywel
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On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 04:29:52 -0700, hyweldavies

I think we should all change to the FFF system of units - see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microfortnight#FFF_units
Expressing speed in furlongs per fortnight (approx centimeters per minute) is particularly appealing ;-)
Regards, Tony
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Reminds me of a collegue who, when asked "how long's a nanonsecond?" held his fingers about a foot apart, and said "about this long". Took me a good few seconds to realise he wasn't being silly: he was an electronic engineer. Even more valid now meter is officially defined in terms of time, rather than wavelengths of such-and-such.
Physicist define mass in terms of electron volts - and if I recall correctly that isn't just in terms of energy (E=mc2), but has an additional in-built fudge factor you're expected to know (mass of whatever particle I think) - though might be wrong on the last point.
Another confusing one I've heard of but not seen, is a tape measure graduate in feet and tenths. Catches out those of us expecting inches.
But then, tyre sizes are typically mm across and inches diameter.
And (British) BA screws are a metric thread, and (German) DIN diving valves are 5/8" (or something) BSP.
Hywel
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wrote:

Petrol consumption measured per furlong^-2. :)
I first met FFF when I was getting my Edukayshun. Back then, a firkin per fortnight was just about the right "fuel" consumption for a young, virile, rugby-playing engineering student.
Regards,
David P.
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That would be working to a base of 4096 I assume......
wrote:

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1/12 of a foot!
1/36 of a yard!
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What size foot?

Not my back yard!
;-)
--
mvh Uffe



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Dave A wrote:

Tolerances in metric are in (I was tempted to write "m"; that's how it is pronounced in German). The IT-tolerance fields at least. On drawings, it is decimal (4711 +0.009 - 0.000)
Nick
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i am 17 and doing a nvq 2 (performing engineering operations at the moment and we work to +/- 0.25mm i find the metric system much better to work with for small stuff but imperial is best for anything over 2 or 3 feet cos you just end up with stupid long numbers
andy
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wrote:

Thats why we have: kilometers meters centimeters millimeters micrometers nanometers Just to mention a few :-)
--
mvh Uffe



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