Metrication advocates are at it again

The coffee-house elitists who believe metrication should be universal, and
mandatory in the US, are at it again. Take a gander at misc.metric-system
which started about a month ago and is now running as hot as forged steel at
2,220f!
Least we be swayed by the lull of decimal ease... the US is the world leader
in innovation, invention, technology, consumer goods, manufacturing
technology, quality assurance and wealth creation... maybe not because we
use the Imperial system, but it sure hasn't stopped us as the Metrication
people claim. The metrication advocates sing a pretty song that sounds good
to politicians. If we don't continue the battle, they will win by taking the
Imperial system from us and force us all into the decimal quagmire.
Can you imagine that your workshop would improve if you gave up your jobbers
set of fractional drills, number drills, letter drills and .001 incremental
reamers? And this is just the start! Give me a number 7 drill and a quarter
twenty tap please!
Wayne
Reply to
Wayne Lundberg
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And oddly enough, most of that stuff goes on in metric. There are no laws are requirements that prohibit the use of metric standards in the US.
I worked three years for a firm where all the prints, dimensions, tolerances, and manufacturing went on under the metric system. We sold overseas and also in the US.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
Exactly, it's none of the government's business whether we do design in hard metric or inch units. In electronics (PCB design, for example) it's usually mixed since newer surface-mount packages are hard metric (0.8mm or 0.5mm lead pitch). Want to use a M3 instead of a 4-40 screw because the parts are $0.003 instead of $0.0045? Up to you.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
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My fear is that the metrication gang will sing a silver song to people who have no clue and will force us into giving up all our manuals, catalogs, supplies, standards, in order to satisfy some fictional benefit which does not exist. At the turn of the century Pratt & Whittney fought a brave battle against standard metrication in the US and it looks like we may have to do it again. I want both systems --- plus the sixty second minute, plus the hex dex and binary system, and 16 bits and 32 bits and my cup of coffee and 12 ounce beer. Why should we give any of this up for the sake of some socialistic elitist's lunacy?
Wayne
Reply to
Wayne Lundberg
Sorry to break the news to you, but the US has been using decimal units for a very long time already - decimal inches. If you think decimal units are a quagmire, you're already trapped and fossilized.
Dave
Reply to
Dave Martindale
Wayne: Do they use metric paper sizes in Mexico or US/Canadian sizes?
Maybe it could be used as an excuse to provide massive gov't subsidies to American manufacturing for the "changeover". Add some lax enforcement and clever statistics-gathering to the brew..
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
Reply to
Spehro Pefhany
Umm, nobody really cares about this any more, because all the manufacturing has gone overseas. I think it basically amounts to re-shuffling the deck chairs as the liner goes down.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
No benefits? Are you (##^#@)(! kidding?? New students to any scientific or technical discipline have an *extremely* hard time learning the bizarreness of the English system. I remember when I was learning physics--the whole book was in metric and I had negligible problems with that. But a couple problems were in English and they hosed me completely. There was one problem in particular that involved finding a PSI in the faucets on the second floor of a house. I spent literally an entire evening obtaining negative pressures, infinite pressures and other nonsensical values. Finally I just converted the givens to metric, did the problem and converted the answer back to English. Got the right answer the first time.
Furthermore, all physical science, including in the US, is done in metric. Therefore the people that make their equipment should use it too. The lost Mars craft is an example of why everyone should be on the same system.
Reply to
PhysicsGenius
Well, the physics is. But the engineering behind the physics is pretty much ambidexterous. Ac - dc if you will.
Jim
================================================== please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ==================================================
Reply to
jim rozen
I agree, metric is logically the way to go. But getting everyone to agree, and then do it is an uphill battle. Gradually it will eventually happen, in fact is already happening. Look at US made (read: US assembled) vehicles, they are a combination of metric and English and getting more metric all the time. We live in a global economy and should fit in the best we can. I consider us lucky enough in that the English language is so universal, just like the metric system should be.
Lane
Reply to
lane
RIGHT ON! The only problem with the metric system is getting people over the idea that the English Customary sytem is easier to use or in some way "normal". Change always encounters inertia. This is the only country in the world (that I can think of anyway) that stubbornly sticks to inches and pounds and that only in the public sector. Maybe it is a conspiracy by the tool companies. If you have two systems everyone has to have two sets of tools!. By the way, without looking it up or doing a lot of calculation, how many cubic inches are contained in a quart? Inches in a mile? What are the dimensions of a tank that will hold one gallon? Now tell me the English system is better! All you have to do is work with it for a while and metric becomes sec>"Wayne Lundberg" writes:
Reply to
Gary Hallenbeck
Since any busy shop goes through that stuff pretty fast, I doubt it would have a lot of impact. On the other hand, I've seen plenty of blunders in my work (failure analysis of missile system electroncs) that arose from errors of arithmetic on the part of designers. Anything that simplifies their job is probably to the good. You may be amused to note that my employer, Lockheed-Martin, while officially an advocate of metric conversion, hasn't bothered with it internally, which defalction is credited with the loss of a Mars lander not so very long ago.
Al Moore
Reply to
Alan Moore
In fact, the US is an original signer of the Metric convention, and has been officially "metric" since about 1790. All of our conventional units are definied in terms of the metric system.
Yep. There's never been a US automobile without at least one metric thread, but now they're pretty much entirely metric.
Al Moore
Reply to
Alan Moore
The metric rzoles started the chant in Australia in the 60's and got lucky. We went metric in 1966.
You have an old house and now want a new door (2'8"x6'8" standard pre '66) can't buy them any more. a piece of 4x2, think you guys put it 2x4 is still 4x2 cept they call it 50x100. If you buy timber now from 2 different yards, you'll get 2 different sizes.
The price of everything went up. and yet 35 years later you still can't buy an Aussi made metric bolt they call them 10mm but they are the old 3/8" whitworth thread. Metric threaded stuff is imported and twice (at least) the price.
And the jobs went overseas too. Hear you guys moaning about jobs going overseas. If you go metric more jobs will go overseas. If Ford and Chrysler have to retool to metric Toyota and Honda and the Korean guys cars will be a lot cheaper.
Petrol ah yes was cents per gallon now costs us to-day 89.9c / litre (1/5th gallon roughly).
Farmers here still talk feet inches and acres. They buy US machinery - all Imperial - not interested in change.
Mothers still refer to baby's birth weight in lbs and ozs no-one understands babies weighing x Kilos.
Resist guys and make a noise we are sorry we didn't.
Glenn
Reply to
Glenn Cramond
================================= Huh? I suspect you're referring to the spark plugs when you say "at least one metric thread", but most early cars had inch thread plugs.
If not the spark plugs, then what metric thread do you mean?
Joe
Reply to
Joe Way
I don't see how this is even possible. Australia has heard of capitalism, right? If there is a demand, there will be a supply. I would imagine that the number of doorways made pre-1966 must be pretty high--but here's you saying you "can't buy them".
Reply to
PhysicsGenius

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