Metrication advocates are at it again

The coffee-house elitists who believe metrication should be universal, and mandatory in the US, are at it again. Take a gander at misc.metric-system
which started about a month ago and is now running as hot as forged steel at 2,220f!
Least we be swayed by the lull of decimal ease... the US is the world leader in innovation, invention, technology, consumer goods, manufacturing technology, quality assurance and wealth creation... maybe not because we use the Imperial system, but it sure hasn't stopped us as the Metrication people claim. The metrication advocates sing a pretty song that sounds good to politicians. If we don't continue the battle, they will win by taking the Imperial system from us and force us all into the decimal quagmire.
Can you imagine that your workshop would improve if you gave up your jobbers set of fractional drills, number drills, letter drills and .001 incremental reamers? And this is just the start! Give me a number 7 drill and a quarter twenty tap please!
Wayne
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Ahem. Surely, you mean .00097656 incremental reamers? ;-)
-tih
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Tom Ivar Helbekkmo, Senior System Administrator, EUnet Norway
www.eunet.no T: +47-22092958 M: +47-93013940 F: +47-22092901
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Can I buy one overnight from my McMaster Carr catalog?
writes:

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Lundberg says...

And oddly enough, most of that stuff goes on in metric. There are no laws are requirements that prohibit the use of metric standards in the US.
I worked three years for a firm where all the prints, dimensions, tolerances, and manufacturing went on under the metric system. We sold overseas and also in the US.
Jim
================================================= please reply to: JRR(zero) at yktvmv (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com ================================================
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On 2 Jan 2004 11:57:37 -0800, the renowned jim rozen

Exactly, it's none of the government's business whether we do design in hard metric or inch units. In electronics (PCB design, for example) it's usually mixed since newer surface-mount packages are hard metric (0.8mm or 0.5mm lead pitch). Want to use a M3 instead of a 4-40 screw because the parts are $0.003 instead of $0.0045? Up to you.
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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wrote: ---snip---

----snip---
My fear is that the metrication gang will sing a silver song to people who have no clue and will force us into giving up all our manuals, catalogs, supplies, standards, in order to satisfy some fictional benefit which does not exist. At the turn of the century Pratt & Whittney fought a brave battle against standard metrication in the US and it looks like we may have to do it again. I want both systems --- plus the sixty second minute, plus the hex dex and binary system, and 16 bits and 32 bits and my cup of coffee and 12 ounce beer. Why should we give any of this up for the sake of some socialistic elitist's lunacy?
Wayne
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On Fri, 02 Jan 2004 20:49:28 GMT, the renowned "Wayne Lundberg"

Wayne: Do they use metric paper sizes in Mexico or US/Canadian sizes?
Maybe it could be used as an excuse to provide massive gov't subsidies to American manufacturing for the "changeover". Add some lax enforcement and clever statistics-gathering to the brew..
Best regards, Spehro Pefhany
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Lundberg says...

Umm, nobody really cares about this any more, because all the manufacturing has gone overseas. I think it basically amounts to re-shuffling the deck chairs as the liner goes down.
Jim
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Wayne Lundberg wrote:

scientific or technical discipline have an *extremely* hard time learning the bizarreness of the English system. I remember when I was learning physics--the whole book was in metric and I had negligible problems with that. But a couple problems were in English and they hosed me completely. There was one problem in particular that involved finding a PSI in the faucets on the second floor of a house. I spent literally an entire evening obtaining negative pressures, infinite pressures and other nonsensical values. Finally I just converted the givens to metric, did the problem and converted the answer back to English. Got the right answer the first time.
Furthermore, all physical science, including in the US, is done in metric. Therefore the people that make their equipment should use it too. The lost Mars craft is an example of why everyone should be on the same system.
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Well, the physics is. But the engineering behind the physics is pretty much ambidexterous. Ac - dc if you will.
Jim
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I agree, metric is logically the way to go. But getting everyone to agree, and then do it is an uphill battle. Gradually it will eventually happen, in fact is already happening. Look at US made (read: US assembled) vehicles, they are a combination of metric and English and getting more metric all the time. We live in a global economy and should fit in the best we can. I consider us lucky enough in that the English language is so universal, just like the metric system should be.
Lane
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Wayne Lundberg wrote:

Yes, of course, that's it! It's socialistic elitist lunacy. Now why didn't I think of that? Abrasha http://www.abrasha.com
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Wayne Lundberg wrote

That might be true in a free market, but the market is not free. It is distorted by billions of dollars of taxpayer funded contracts.
For example, Nasa and the US military specify metric units in contracts. This provides a financial incentive for their suppliers to increase the adoption of metric.
In contrast, taxpayer funded civil construction (roads etc) contracts are specified in non-metric units. This provides a financial incentive for their suppliers to continue their use of non-metric units.

You have not served have you? If you had, you would know that the military uses metric. Feel free to tell a group of American soldiers that they are socialist elite lunatics.
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What and where?
JTMcC.
This provides a financial

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wrote:

In fact, the US is an original signer of the Metric convention, and has been officially "metric" since about 1790. All of our conventional units are definied in terms of the metric system.

Yep. There's never been a US automobile without at least one metric thread, but now they're pretty much entirely metric.
Al Moore
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On Sat, 03 Jan 2004 01:16:19 GMT, Alan Moore

================================Huh? I suspect you're referring to the spark plugs when you say "at least one metric thread", but most early cars had inch thread plugs.
If not the spark plugs, then what metric thread do you mean?
Joe
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wrote:

Spark plugs, yeah. The US ceramic industry didn't have anything that would stand up to internal combustion stresses, and the Europeans, who did, weren't interested in producing anything with an inch thread. By the time we'd caught up to them in ceramics, the auto industry had standardized on metric threaded plugs.
Now I did no someone who had a car that didn't use metric threaded plugs -- it was a Stanley.
Al Moore
Q: What do the United States, Burma and Upper Volta have in common? A: They are the three most technologically advanced nations not using the SI units.
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As long as this came up, I've got a Champion spark plug with 1/2" NPT threads on it. It's also can be disassembled for cleaning by removing a gland nut. It has dual ground electrodes and uses a copper gasket for sealing the ceramic to the body.
Skeptical? See:
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/jeff/plug.jpg
I picked it up at an antique shop in Minnesota a couple of years ago..
But I can not tell a lie, my plug probably didn't spend any time in an automobile, because on the opposite side of the ceramic there's the word "Maytag", so I suspect it came from one of those gasoline powered washing machines in use before rural electrification.
I suspect the same style plug was probably used in automobiles around the same time. I owned half of a Model A Ford in high school, and I've got vague recollections of the plugs having pipe threads on them, but I could be wrong about that.
Alan Moore wrote:

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Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)

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They did (use pipe threads at one time).
Which half of the model A did you own?
Jim (being reminded of a really, really stupid joke)
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jim rozen wrote:

I owned the half which required repairs, always by me of course.
My non-techie but handsome blonde buddy Pete owned the seats, on which he smooched (and probably more) with sweet young things most weekends.
It was a "real" convertible, with roll up glass windows and a rumble seat. At that time there were still lots of Model As in daily use out there in San Francisco. I've heard they stayed on the roads in South America a lot longer than that.
Thanks for the memories. Pete and I still converse by e-mail every few days..
The two of us, circa '52, but without the Model A, can be seen at:
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/jeff/PeteJeff.jpg
Jeff
Jeff Wisnia (W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"If you can smile when things are going wrong, you've thought of someone to blame it on."
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