Ultimate digital caliper for modelers.

Love my digital calipers and the ability to switch between metric and
English at a touch. Now some have a third mode, fractional. The ultimate
digital caliper for modelers should have all that and also the ability to
enter a scale factor and read directly the scale size..and then flip to see
it in millimeters, inches, fractions, etc. Technically (speaking as a
one-time digital designer) it is not difficult to do. The only way to get
this function today is to buy a really high-end digital caliper with a
computer interface. Then you have to drag a cable and computer around as
you work. Cumbersome and expensive. Should be self-contained.
Maybe we modelers can get a movement going and interest a caliper
manufacturer in such a project.
Boris
Reply to
Boris Beizer
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Do you know how it determines the denominator when it's not an exact conversion? E.g., would 15mm convert to 1/2 (18% small), 5/8 (6% large), 9/16 (5% small), 19/32 (1/3% large), etc? Hopefully, the user would have some choice. I can think of a couple of ways of doing it - do you know how they do it?
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
A quick googling found several models - with fractional resolutions of 1/64 or 1/128. I suppose the documentation will explain whether the device will read low, high or closest to available unit.
That would be handy for the target market of woodworkers and such, I don't see it such a big deal for scale railroad modeling. I really would like to see scale size available.
There was an HO scale dial caliper out, not sure if it's still available.
Val
Reply to
Val
I think I'll stick to my old manual type ones , I've had them for many years along with my micrometers and they served me well in my work ,now in my hobby. I have a few scale calculators that work well .
Reply to
Kevin(Bluey)
Will it do 24ths? I model in 1/24th scale (and 1:87) I don't seem to be able to find a 1/24" scale rule anywhere.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
Binary fractions of an inch...interesting...
Reply to
Rufus
"Bob Engelhardt" wrote: (clip) Do you know how it determines the denominator when it's not an exact
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ The most logical thing would be for it to read in the fractions that it is set up to resolve, and jump from one to the next, without trying to get exact matches to the other scales. If you are reading in 1/128's of an inch, for example, you are interested in the closest value to the actual diameter--not the closest value to a number in some other scale.
Reply to
Leo Lichtman
Good evening Boris;
And I suppose you would want it to print the data, too. What you request would be fine for single readings. Unless the instrument has a useful memory, you will have to write them down. Gee, just like the old days.
Cheers, John
Reply to
John Fraser
Sounds like you need to buy a 1" square rod at the hardware store. Normally in 3' lengths, can be cut down...
Then using paper or plastic sheeting - print scales. Verify sizes, redo as needed. Then since you are a model maker, make a scale. Square not triangular.
Since square - you can do your two scales and metric and inch or others as needed. Naturally, if you had a CNC mill, then the job is trivial.
But a laser pinter or bubble has the ability. Just coat the paper with Stay Clear and away you go!
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Life; NRA LOH & Endowment Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot"s Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member.
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Greg Procter wrote:
Reply to
Martin H. Eastburn
What I meant in my example was: If you measured something that was actually 15mm, but wanted it to read in fractions, how would it display?
I would hope that it wouldn't display in some fixed denominator, e.g., 128 ths. Because measuring something to be 96/128 is not nearly as useful as knowing it's 3/4. What about 80/128, now what is that? Let's see ... divide both by 16 gives 5/8. OK, 5/8 it is. I'd want one that would say 5/8, not 80/128. Can you imagine a list of material described this way: "2 pcs 80/128 brass, 4 72/128 long".
Bob
Reply to
Bob Engelhardt
Low cost have a data port . But they need a 2nd memory so u can go back and forth ABS and REL .
Im doin ARM7 mcu , but software is Luddite , so no one is having fun . Ill give some free s/w soon , end all that . My s/w wont use English Text to program. Have you ever heard of anyone progarmming a computer at high level , with no text input ? I will be the first , Anyone , anywhere of any nationality will be able to program it in minutes , without a manual ..
BTW Stay away from VXB bearing . I got ripped . $500 of 6002 and 6003 , the cage was dragging ,
kinda like that HF mill-drill that used tapered rollers and lower roller cage was dragging on the housing !
Reply to
werty
Boris Beizer spake thus:
So there are calipers with digital outputs? That gives me an idea: what if a guy were to connect such a caliper to a small custom-made unit, instead of a computer, that would display the size in whatever scale desired?
I probably have enough skills programming a little bitty CPU (like the Ubicom [formerly Scenix] SX-28) to make something like this. Sounds like a fun project. Could fit in a small box, easy to more around with you.
Anyone know the type of interface these calipers use? USB? Serial?
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
Serial of some sort, I should hope. Sounds like a good project for a programming excersize with a graphing calculator - like one of the advanced HPs...they have a serial interface.
Reply to
Rufus
me spake thus:
Looks like they use plain ol' RS-232. Now can anyone tell me the data format?
Reply to
David Nebenzahl
PRINT!!?? WiFi to a storage device.
Reply to
Paul Newhouse
Not RS-232 levels, but it is a serial data format, not quite TTL levels.. See
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or
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Regards, Bob Headrick
Reply to
Bob Headrick
I use mine for handloading. (to the tune of several thousand rounds a year avg.)
I cant see them being *that* necessary for plastic modeling.
;-)
Reply to
AM
That's right. That's the intention. So if I'm working to say, 1:25 scale, and I pick up a piece of wood, I can immediately measure if it is the 5.4cm thickness I'm looking for.
Boris
Reply to
Boris Beizer
Boy! That's even worse than Metric. :-) ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick
I doubt that seriously. RS 232 requires + and - at least 7 volts. I wish people that use specifications would read them first. :-( ...lew...
Reply to
Lew Hartswick

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