Recommend sources for DC motors

Anyone recommend a company that supplies surplus DC motors in the 1.5 to 2
HP range, 250V or so?
TIA
Reply to
Brian Reay
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Bosch sell some. About £200 each I think. Somewhere I have their catalogue. If you're still reading this thread let me know and I'll see if I can find their phone number.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
I think you're referring to the Bosch GPA 750 which is officially 1HP and favoured by builders of combat robots, though they usually weld them up for added durability!. A quick Google should find all the info, Ellis components are I believe the only UK stockist and it's around £100, though that could have changed as I've been out of the robot wars thing for a while now. Oh and they are 24V, I would have thought 250V DC was a very odd voltage for a motor of this size.
Greg
Reply to
Greg
If it's really 24V you're after I've got a couple of 24V traction motors spare, anonymous but I'd guess at least 1 hp from their size, apparently unused.
Cheers Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
Got any pictures? :-))
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web:
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
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Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
The output shaft is 3/4" dia, the motor body is 4" + dia. AFAIR it's 3000 rpm @ 24V
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Cheers Tim Dutton Dry-Dock Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
That model number rings a bell. It may not be exactly what Brian is looking for, but it just came into my mind. When I was interested in one (for building a model submarine which I never built) Bosch offered to sell me one direct. It was definitely more than £100 though. I think Leeson might make some DC motors which run at a higher voltage.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Those look much more substantial than the Bosch range. The Bosch range are pressed metal if I remember rightly.
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy
Ellis components are the UK distributor for Bosch electrical parts but trade only, I think Parkside Railways stocks them at a mark-up of course: snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com
Not a cheap motor and as others have said it's a pressed steel (relatively) light weight frame, hence the robot wars people mig weld the frame together to add strength, lightness is of course important to them as they have strict weight limits so a more solid motor is not ideal.
Greg
Reply to
Greg
It might be worth contacting Parvalux - they do motors up to about 1=2E25kW in DC permanent magnet type.
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Cheers
Alastair
Greg wrote:
Reply to
Alastair
Its probably an odd voltage now, but not so much in the past. The standard mains AC supply is relatively new thing, and many locations in the UK had DC supply into the late 1930s and some through the war. DC was typically supplied at 400 to 500 volts on a three wire system, where the central wire was earth and lay roughly between the two. A motor/generator set called a balancer acted to trim the voltage either side of earth.
I suspect the requirement for DC motors at this voltage died out when the CEGB finally managed to get us all onto one system - this was started in 1927, but took a long while to implement.
I have a 1940s/1950s lathe that uses an old GEC motor 1HP at 220VDC with 170V field coils as part of a variable speed drive system. One of the USA Monarch lathes had a similar system, but they probably worked at lower DC voltages, as the AC over there is lower voltage.
I have not seen a modern motor that has a similar specification, and would be interested to know if such a thing exists.
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Funnily enough 220V DC has stayed with us, it's a common battery voltage in large UPS systems, I mean large as in the battery is the size of a fair sized room 8-) Greg
Reply to
Greg
Shame they don't have motors within UPS systems (or do they ?).
I have wondered for some years how we ended up with the mains voltage we did. I had assumed it was a balance between a high enough voltage to reduce resistive losses and a low enough voltage that a shock would wake you up and not be deadly. No doubt the CEGB decided, but I am not sure how. Maybe the same criterion is used in UPS systems.
I am a little anxious about setting up the 220V DC within my lathe enclosure as I don't want a shock from it, though I have had many mains shocks without anything other than a BIG wake up call, but we had a 2kV DC source in a lab I worked in and I was told it was deadly - so I treated it like a cobra.
My grandfather (also a model engineer) couldn't feel mains. He had a live workbench and didn't realise until my father visited and got two shocks off it (the first one being blamed on static). He could also test the HT leads on cars to tell you which was good and which bad by sticking his finger in the spark plug socket.
And they call me thick-skinned !!
Steve
Reply to
Steve
Well, in a fit of madness, I bought a variable frequency inverter. These are easy to find and I rather thought that finding a motor would be as simple.
Daft really but what can you do when the buying mist descends?
I have spent (wasted) the last couple of hours trying to find out exactly what motor spec I will need. My lathe is a Myford Super7B.
All I seem to have discovered is that the output shaft is 5/8ths. No doubt they can't be had anymore and I will not be able to fit the current pulley to the new motor.
Can anyone tell me what the mounting dimensions are. I could go and measure mine but it is a bugger to move until I actually come to swap out the motor. I would rather not have to do it twice. In any case, I seem to need the actual frame size and, probably, some more modern NEMA equivalent.
Also, it turns out there are 2-pole and 4-pole motors. What on earth is all that about? I was only just coming to terms with the idea of star and delta winding. Nobody mentions what their motor is so I assume that can be adjusted internally to either configuration.
Can anyone help me with the appropriate motor specs? Oh, and a supplier or two would be nice.
Pete Harrison
Reply to
Peter Harrison
Try Newton-Tesla, Tel: 01925 444 773 or
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supply replacement VSD drives fro Super sevens, including motors. Im a satisfied customer, they were really helpful remotoring my Harrison L5, but no other connection
Dave
Reply to
david.sanderson
It's either a 1/3 or a 1/2 HP 3 phase motor with a 5/8" shaft. Late model lathes had 1/2HP 3 phase motors. It should be foot mounted. A 2 pole motor turns at 2850rpm with 50hz and a 4 pole turns at1450rpm on 50 hz. You want a 4 pole version. Everything else doesn't really matter since the motor mount/ platform is adjustable in just about every direction. An original motor would fit easily but I have fitted a modern brand new metric framed one on a Super 7 for a friend. I had to turn a spacer up to fit a 5/8" pulley on a 14mm shaft.
Charles
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Reply to
Charles Ping
I fitted an inverter and three-phase motor to my S7 Plus, both supplied by a regular contributor to this group. The new 0.5hp three-phase motor is considerably smaller than Myford's original noisy, overheating, vibrating, heavy single-phase monster. It was therefore necessary to make an adapter plate (I used 3/8" aluminium alloy) for the motor mounting, which is probably easier than hunting for a motor with the right holes.
It was also necessary to make a spindle extension and this was done before the old motor was removed. The original pulley is mounted on the extension. I also made a control box to make best use of the features in the inverter.
The result is well worth every single penny and every single minute spent on making the alteration. You really will wonder how you ever managed without it.
From the motor plate:
M.G.C. Systems VDE 0530/IEC34-1 3 phase M Type MA-AL71-14-4A Nr T512/4463 0.37kW 0.5HP (illegible character) Y 230/440V 1.98/1.14A cos phi 0.91 1400 (-1) min (presumably rpm) 50hz
Reply to
Boring
I seem to be making bushes to fit pulleys to motors quite regularly. The technique I use is to turn the OD of a BMS rod to fit the pulley and bore the inside to fit the motor shaft. Part off to form a short length of tube. Turn another piece of scrap to the OD of the motor shaft and fit into the tubular spacer. Mill a slot along the length to the tube using the inner scrap to stop the tube collapsing. Make the slot the same width as the keyway in the motor shaft or very slightly wider. If the keyway in the pulley is the same width as the motor keyway then a simple key but deeper than standard is all you need. If as usual the pulley keyway is wider than that of the motor then a stepped key can be made.
Hope this makes sense.
Bob
Reply to
Bob Minchin
Steve, that sounds a lot like a motor that I have. Probably weighs about 25 kg, is about the size of a large pumpkin, and has something like a 5/8" shaft. I'm saving it with the intention of using it to drive a very large Van de Graaff generator, but as yet it's a project I haven't got round to. Unfortunately my motor hasn't got a data plate. I'll take a picture tonight or tomorrow and post it to see if they're the same.
Best wishes,
Chris
Reply to
Christopher Tidy

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