Source for very small jet


I'm in the process of building a waste oil burner, but need a very
small jet,
0.015" or thereabouts, to fire a stream of compressed air,
can anyone think of
a readily available source of something so small.
Thanks in advance.
Alan.
Reply to
alspeed
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You might try Burlen Fuel systems in Salisbury. They do a range of jets for their Amal gas injectors, you can find some details for the jet characteristics here
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under the Amal gas burner jets download about halfway down the page. Really annoyingly they have converted the downloads to jpeg images rather than the previous PDF format.
Reply to
David Billington
Firstly why not make the jets , Jand L list drills this size and smaller, but if you want to buy finished jets, another source is gas jets for pilot lights, try Plumb Centre. Peter
Reply to
Drawfiler
Other than Burlen which should provide a standard jet, you may have to ask what size jet corresponds to 0.015", I wonder about disposable lighters and pilot light jets.
Reply to
David Billington
Mark Rand formulated on Tuesday :
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If you live in the north, near a Boyes, they are doing sets of 20 micro drills for £2.98 from 0.3 up to 1.5mm
Reply to
Harry Bloomfield
Many thanks to all that have replied, with the current climate my workshop resembles the local morgue and i need to finish this project pronto.
I had considered drilling my own jet, but had discounted the idea, as i can't imagine drilling anything so fine with the combined effort of the equipment i have in my workshop and hands like shovels:D (any tips on this process would be greatfully received).
Must admit i had stupidly not thought of gas pilots, :rolleyes: the disposable lighter suggestion is quite inspired btw, will check one out in the morning.
Thanks again Alan
Reply to
alspeed
If it's associated with gas then Plumb Center (yank spelling yet here in the UK) won't sell it to Joe Public - apparently it's a new policy introduced about a year ago to stop 'illegal gas fitters' Unless you produce a 'Gas Safe' card then they can't even process the purchase (or so reports have said!) Even gas rated PTFE tape is not for sale to the unwashed!
Because of that, and apart from a few oddball water / drainage pipe fittings and primus portable blowtorch refills, all my business for boiler/gas burning bits goes elsewhere - usually online or other more sympathetic plumbing supply places.
Reply to
Mike
Rather odd, since Joe Public specifically doesn't have to have a "Gas Safe" card and can't be a illegal gas fitter since he isn't doing gas work for pay.
More bloody Stalinist ideas from yer friendly government :-|
Mark Rand RTFM
Reply to
Mark Rand
That's the size range of the idle jets in Weber carburettors. However they are a press fit into a holder rather than screwing in, or at least on DCOE style carbs. I think you'd prefer something that screwed into place. You'll find diagrams online if you Google. Anyway it'd be a piece of piss to make a jet out of brass. I have drill bits covering that range I think.
Reply to
Dave Baker
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There's a 0.4mm idle jet. As you can see there's also a little air hole in the side but if you can block that off or arrange the thing to be clamped into a housing that covers that anyway you're sorted.
Reply to
Dave Baker
It's tedious, but it works.
Start with the drill almost completely retracted into the chuck.
Drill a nick.
Ever so slowly, repeatedly withdraw the drill a gnat's cock out of the chuck, retighten and drill again.
If at any time you feel that it's all too tedious, and you want to rush with bigger bites, STOP IMMEDIATELY, go into the house, have a cup of tea and a slice of Christmas cake.
When you have calmed down, resume operations by drilling a gnat's cock deeper with each iteration.
The time taken to compensate for the mistakes made by rushing will far exceed the time it takes to go a gnat-cocking!
Reply to
invalid
The last time that I used a 1/64th drill I drilled about 8mm deep into steel (printer bar) on the lathe. Spotted with a centre drill to give a minimal centre location then put the .015" drill into a pin chuck. Shaft of pin chuck in the tailstock chuck but not clamped tight (capable of spinning). Only there to give initial alignment. With lathe on top speed (about 1500 rpm) I held the pin-chuck in my fingers and fed it in by hand. Worked well and did not take long at all.
Richard
Reply to
Richard Edwards
It's not the government, nor the EU behind the change, there is no new legislation, and essentially nothing has changed apart from the rename from CORGI to Gas Safe. The restriction on sales is Plumb Center's unilateral decision*. Fortunately others haven't followed their lead.
DIY gas work is at the moment, and always has been, legal - as long as you are 'competent' of which there is no 'amateur' measure of competence. Paid work is different, but even the HSE haven't, as far as I am aware, ever actively discouraged DIY work otherwise they would have made recommendations for the introduction of appropriate legislation. I know they mentioned that it 'wasn't a problem' in a discussion document they published a few years ago on gas safety.
*
This is a later press release, repeating much of what they said when their 'ban' first came in.
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Reply to
Mike
Unfortunately they ArcEuro don't sell any smaller than 0.4mm. I seem to have broken my last 0.1mm drill bit and don't know where to get replacements so at the moment I am using home made spade bits which is a bit tedious.
Any suggestions on somewhere which covers the 0.1mm to 0.3mm range would be most helpful.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Bain
Thanks once again for all the replies. I bought a pilot jet this morning from my local gas spares place, it was only a couple of quid and should do the trick. Also picked up a cheap 240v fan from the same place, which someone had ordered and then not collected. Pretty much have everything i need now to start the project. Will post a progress report in due course.
Alan.
Reply to
alspeed

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