conductivity of PANi granules

I just joined this group and I am not sure if this has been posted
already
I have a project on producing conductive nanofibres and fabricating
them from the scratch.
the polymer im using is polyaniline.
As a first step, i have produced polyaniline with ammonium persulfate
as oxidising agent and aniline hydrochloride. This is not completely
soluble in water..
I now have PANi in granule/powder form. To produce the best sample in
the laboratory, I need to test the conductivity levels of polymer
produced at different parameters. I am using concentration as the
varying parameter.
now i need to test this sample in granule form for its conductivity.
journals say that I have to pelletise this powder. How am I supposed to
do this with minimum fuss and good accuracy???
ALso, there is no testing equipment for polymer powder in my
laboratory. So I have to fabricate the instruments required. The
instruments also have to adhere to specified norms.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
also, I read in a journal that aniline is a prospective solvent for
PANi. IS the usage of monomer as a solvent for producing a polymer
anyway detrimental to the quality of the product?? because I used HCL
as after treatment to remove residual aniline.
WIll the usage of Dodecyl benzene sulphonate to produce water-soluble
PANI affect its conductivity properties?
Caroline Joyce Cornelius
Reply to
carol
Loading thread data ...
carol wrote in part:
Can you consider other options? (Purchasing the material? Another ICP?)
Do you have access to a KBr pellet press such as is used for IR work?
It just seems like you are spending a lot of time reinventing things that have already been done. You aren't even at the point of making the fibers yet. Here is a link on making such fibers:
formatting link
John Aspen Research, -
formatting link
"Turning Questions into Answers"
Opinions expressed herein are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
Reply to
john.spevacek
Im an undergraduate student of textile technology. yes the part i am currently doing has already been done. preparation of polyaniline has been known for a pretty long time.
I have prepared polyaniline samples now. What is actually new in my work maybe the fabrication part of polyaniline.
There is no KBr press in my department. Nobody has tried this in my department before. My professor wants me to fabricate the instrument and since I dont know the rules to be conformed to, it is a bit confusing now.
Can you please tell me how this KBr press works? Maybe I can do a simpler version of it on my own.
Thanks for the link. I already have that paper. That comes a little later after I decide on the parameters to be conformed to for the samples I have. Caroline
Reply to
carol
Going for another ICP isnt that easy. I dont seem to get polyaniline sample that easy in India.
Producing the sample according to my specifications also sounded much easier than procuring it.
Reply to
carol
Here is a link to a site with a picture of a pellet press.
formatting link
If you google for "pellet press" you can find others as well. There are no standards or rules for these tools, so feel free to be creative. For your needs, you want to make good contact between all the particles so that the current can freely flow. As you can imagine, the greater the pressure, the greater the conductivity, although I would imagine that the curve falls off, maybe logarithmic. The initial increase of pressure will show a great increase in conductivity. Each successive increase will show smaller increases in conductivity.
To ensure repeatibility, you will probably want to use the same amount of material each time, and use the same pressure (hang a weight from the end of the lever arm).
John Aspen Research, -
formatting link
"Turning Questions into Answers"
Opinions expressed herein are my own and may not represent those of my employer.
Reply to
john.spevacek
Does your university/college have a chemistry department? They would almost certainly have a KBr pellet press as they would use it in preparing samples for infrared spectrometry. They're also quite commonly used in inorganic chemistry groups looking at ceramics, superconductors, semiconductors, etc. Fabricating such a press would be difficult unless you have experience of reasonably heavy engineering tooling - they can produce up to some very high pressures!
Colin
Dr Colin Reed Business Development Manager - Adhesives Rosehill Polymers Ltd
formatting link

Reply to
Colin Reed
I dont know concepts of heavy engineering. I was thinking of asking the college workshop to fabricate a die for me...
I located the KBr press. Only the official permission is pending..
Thanks for the help
Reply to
carol

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.