Caterpillar track designs

At about the time of 11/30/2004 3:40 PM, Blueeyedpop stated the following:


I object to being called a troll.
<goes back under bridge) :-)
Seriously, I have found this thread quite educational myself. Obviously, this is going to be for outdoor use. Why not make some links that use a hinge type joint and rivit some rubber cleats onto them?
--
Daniel Rudy

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"Daniel Rudy" <5n6o7.8d9c0r1u2d3y4.5s6p7a8m9@0e1m2a3i4l5.6p7a8c9b0e1l2l3.4i5n6v7a8l9i0d1.2 n3e4t5> wrote in message> At about the time of 11/30/2004 3:40 PM, Blueeyedpop stated the following:

a
useful
Oh well if you don`t mind me chuntering on -
Adjustable Venetian blinds use a rather clever technique of Macrame to be able to be folded-up but also to adjust their aperture to govern light through!
To keep on the gist of Tank tracks, this might be a usefull idea for on/ off road use whereby the "tread" of the tracks can be automatically raised and lowered according to ground conditions?
To add further to childs ride-on toys, it shouldn`t be impossable to fit some kind of flexible drive and tread mechanism and could prove to be safer than those three and four wheeled bikes already on the market (which tend to flip over and roll about).
Sarcasm doesn`t bother me too much, I was raised on the stuff!
----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ashley Clarke -------------------------------------------------------
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At about the time of 12/4/2004 3:15 PM, Mr Clarke stated the following:

But how would you adjust them? More importantly, how would you keep the adjusting mechanism from jamming?

The problem with those ATVs is that they are really too narrow. So when there is a rider on them, they are top heavy and are prone to flipping and rolling over. Any tank design should be wide and low to the ground to stabilize the center of gravity.

FWIW, I wasn't being sarcastic. But hey, wouldn't be the first time someone misinterpreted me. Oh, you mean the part about the troll...Well...
--
Daniel Rudy

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"Daniel Rudy" <5n6o7.8d9c0r1u2d3y4.5s6p7a8m9@0e1m2a3i4l5.6p7a8c9b0e1l2l3.4i5n6v7a8l9i0d1.2 n3e4t5> wrote in message> At about the time of 12/4/2004 3:15 PM, Mr Clarke stated the following:> > Adjustable Venetian blinds use a rather clever technique of Macrame to

light
on/
and
If you imagine the Track stretched out so that it is a circle, plot around it pivot points with a lever protuding out from each one and then up some length of each lever is attached another pivot point with yet another circle attached to it (so it is probably larger or smaller than the track circle); By rotating the outer (or inner) "control" circle, all the levers attached to it will turn the same amount at the same time. The levers will be each "tread" around the circumference of the track. Because the control linkage is flexible, the circle of linkages can be squashed into almost any track shape.
Jamming will have to be overcome with carefull consideration of the shapes of the linkages, as with any other design difficulties encountered. In analogy, Tyre tread is now very much a science in itself when all it started out as was a rough idea for a bumpy surface on a rubber wheel.
----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ashley Clarke -------------------------------------------------------
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This only works if the track is shaped like a circle. Picture a track like a rectangle with a semicircle at each end. Then add another one outside like you did with the circle. At the straight parts, the linkages would be seperated by the same distance on both belts. Along the semicircles, they would not, meaning that either the outer belt would have to stretch there or the inne belt would have to conract.
regards,
--
Knut Eldhuset

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At about the time of 12/6/2004 3:45 AM, Knut Eldhuset stated the following:

Exactly. You know, I just thought of something...
What if you make the track in two layers, and combine those layers with springs. The inside track would be driven by the wheels, and the outside track would be spring adjusted. That way, the tread flipout would be adjustable based on the difference between the two layers. It wouldn't be easy to implement though.
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Daniel Rudy

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"Daniel Rudy" <5n6o7.8d9c0r1u2d3y4.5s6p7a8m9@0e1m2a3i4l5.6p7a8c9b0e1l2l3.4i5n6v7a8l9i0d1.2 n3e4t5> wrote in message wrote:

track
"tread"
like
be
they
there
The original suggestion was to simplify Tracks (not for military use either). That`s got you thinking. Well I guess I`ll let you experts get on with it then.
----------------------------------------------------------------------- Ashley Clarke -------------------------------------------------------
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Try www.intralox.com
They make all kinds of plastic hinged belting systems that are perfect for treads. These are normally used for industrial conveyors but are very configurable. They even have some with rubber cleats. Knock your self out:)
Dave
"Daniel Rudy" <5n6o7.8d9c0r1u2d3y4.5s6p7a8m9@0e1m2a3i4l5.6p7a8c9b0e1l2l3.4i5n6v7a8l9i0d1.2 n3e4t5> wrote in message> At about the time of 11/30/2004 3:40 PM, Blueeyedpop stated the following:

a
useful
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Specifically try the 900 series. They can be made in narrow strips and are configurable to almost any length/width. They even have matching sprockets available.
http://www.intralox.com/product_detail/s900beltid.htm
Dave
"Daniel Rudy" <5n6o7.8d9c0r1u2d3y4.5s6p7a8m9@0e1m2a3i4l5.6p7a8c9b0e1l2l3.4i5n6v7a8l9i0d1.2 n3e4t5> wrote in message> At about the time of 11/30/2004 3:40 PM, Blueeyedpop stated the following:

a
useful
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Thanks for the links, Dave! I'll definately check them out. In the beginning, I'm thinking I'll try something like a conveyer belt with some traction pads glued on, but those links look a lot nicer.
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Ben Hallert wrote:

The problem with reusing conveyor track systems on tracked vehicles is that they're not usually well-designed to cope with dirt and rocks in the sprockets, or with side loads. It's easy for tracked vehicles to throw a track. It took decades for the tank and tractor people to get that right, and even today, sloppy tank driving can throw a track.
If you want a belt-based system, look into multiple V-belts like these:
http://www.wcbn.com.sg/minghee/belts.htm http://www.emerson-ept.com/EPTroot/Public/prod/BrgVDrive/BrgVdrive.htm
Watch those pinch points.
                John Nagle
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These belts have grooves molded in which prevent them from popping off from side loads and can have side guides that don't actually touch but would keep them from popping off.. Many of these styles also have through holes that allow dirt to be forced through to some extent. I guess though it depends on how rugged of terrain you are going to use them with if there is alot of dirt and gravel it may be a problem. I am just going to use on carpet, floors so these would work fine for that.
My concern with v-belt systems is that it needs more energy to bend the rubber around the sheave, and needs to be tensioned pretty tight to keep them from bowing out or comming off.
Dave

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The name really says it all. If these products were meant to be tracks, the company would market them as such, but instead they're rightly labeled "belts". It may seem the simply application, but using belts as tracks will be met with poor results. That said, good luck, and please let us know how it turns out.
DaveC wrote:

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