Dangers of mixing chlorates with AP in composite propellant

I was just out at Blackrock at the Aeronaut launch event. A kind fellow rocketeer warned me of the dangers of mixing chlorates with Ammonium
Perchlorate in composite propellants. I don't remember what he said the potential chemical reactions were which caused the danger. Please enlighten me and if possible list some articles that I can read about the subject. In particular Potasium Chlorate with AP. On the same subject I purchased a book from Skylighter named Plastic Resin Bonded High Energy Rocket Fuels Systems which specifically mentions that Potasium Perchlorate can be mixed with Ammonium Perchlorate to increase burn temperature and decrease burn rate. It gives no warning of the hazards of mixing chlorates with AP.
thanks, KT
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There are stories that ammonium chlorate (or the ammonium ion in the presence of the chlorate ion) is an especially unstable arrangement. I cannot attest to the truth of these stories... mostly because chlorate compositions are extremely shock, friction and temperature sensitive, even without the ammonium ion. Avoid them. Just avoid them.
Also, the standard disclaimers:
Void where prohibited! You'll put somebody's eye out with that thing!
Luck (you'll need it) and Regards, -Larry C.

enlighten
In
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Yup. Exchange reactions can take place forming less desirable chlorates than the >relatively< benign potassium or sodium chlorate. Mixing oxidizers safely requires a thorough understanding of which combinations are safe. If in the slightest doubt at all, don't do it.

a
Fuels
mixed
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snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net wrote:

Both Ammonium Perchlorate and Potassium Chlorate are salts. With just a little bit of moisture, the ions are free to migrate. One of the results is that you will create Ammonium Chlorate, which is very unstable. From Wikipedia:
"Ammonium chlorate is a very unstable oxidizer and will decompose, sometimes violently, at room temperature. It will explode when exposed to sunlight for a few minutes. Even solutions are known to be unstable. Because of the dangerous nature of this salt it should only be kept in solution when needed, and never be allowed to crystallize."

Note the above does not say anything about Chlorates, both are PERChlorates.
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I've made a thermalite igniter mixture in small amounts with a recipe off of the web. It is an eleven part mix. It used some potassium chlorate and perchlorate. I mixed all the liquids together and then added the powders and made sure it was thoroughly whetted. Friction was less of a problem.
Now this isn't rocket fuel and is used for ignition purposes and igniter making. It can be made safely if one is cautious. I believe trying to use the chlorate and perchlorate together for rocket fuel is a very dicey proposition.
Kurt
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Potassium perchlorate is a perchlorate, not a chlorate. Completely different.
-- David

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