Safe design for N2O tank enclosure

I'm busily collecting pieces-parts for launching hybrids, and want to build an enclosure that will house the nitrous tank, solenoids, and have a bit of
storage space. The main point is to protect the tank valve & solenoid assemblies.
Is there a preferred position for the nitrous tank? I've seen some launch photos where the tanks are vertical, others are horizontal. If there is no particular operational or safety preference, I'd prefer the horizontal position. I'm aware of the transport situation, I'm wondering specifically about launch conditions.
TIA for any input.
Kevin OClassen NAR 13578
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I guess it depends what kind of tank you have. If it has a dip tube, then it needs to be upright. If it doesn't, then it needs to be upside down or at an angle with the valve lower than the tank bottom.
Les.

build
of
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Thanks. A call to the organization that sold me the tank reveals no dip tube.
Kevin OClassen
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Then what you need is to have the tank upside down and need to build a wood frame, I used 2x4's in a box formation, 4 uprights connected by smaller cross bars. Leave the bottom cross bars up high enough so you have what looks like legs that leaves room for the valves/solenoid to clear the ground. I have mine setup so that i can slide the frame over the tank while it's standing upright and then i can filp it over. If you want i can send you a pic via email or post it on alt.binaries.models.rockets. let me know.
Koen
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Does it really need to be upside down? Or just on its side with the valve lower than the base?
Koen O. Loeven wrote:

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My tank has a siphon tube so it stays upright. I lay my O2 tank next to it (horizontal). Neither is enclosed. I picked up a welding cart from Harbor Freight that I use to transport the tanks from car to the launch pad.
Kevin OClassen wrote:

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Kevin, My son and I made up a "wagon" sort of thing that holds the launch battery and all the other stuff. It's eassy to transport in the back of my truck and keeps everything togetheronce at the launch site.
http://hometown.aol.com/tfish38/page4.html
Tony
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You might want to think about insulation for the tank. Keeping it cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Maybe a wrap of water heater blanket? Or an appropriately sized icebox? Or maybe foamboard around the outside of the framework holding the tank?
I noticed later in the thread that you've discovered your tank has no siphon. If your tank is exactly horizontal the liquid level will fall below the outlet when the tank is about half full, right? You want liquid to flow to the motor, not just gas. If you have an enormous tank maybe you don't care. But most people seem to want to be fairly aggressive about getting to the bottom of their tank. So, I'm guessing, you'll want to mount upside down to get the most liquid out...     Will
Kevin OClassen wrote:

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Will Marchant, NAR 13356, Tripoli 10125 L2
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Here in Texas the biggest problem is summer (it rarely gets colder than 50 or so in the winter and if it does it is almost always windy too). I put my 15lb tank in a bucket of ice water and then wrap a towel around it, dipping in the water. I think a wet towel by itself would help. The ideal temp for N2O is around 70F. At 80F it's getting too warm. Above 90F it is useless for filling flight tanks. Your flight tank will chill as the expanding N2O hits it, so that will cool it down. Even a small air gap between the MMT and body will help keep it cool enough between filling and launching.
Will Marchant wrote:

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In Mojave they use a steel drum filled with ice. Fits a couple of tanks.

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Thanks for the thoughts. Oddly enough, the insulation will be more to keep the tank warm than cold. Here the temp goes above 70 about 5 times a year, for 6 or 7 minutes at a time. Well, maybe not quite that extreme, but it's not tropical. Also, since our best launch field is a frozen lake (waivered to 9000) I'm hoping to shoot in winter as well. I had considered cannabalizing one of those hi-tech warming-cooling "coolers" to try to maintain tanks temps in extreme consitions, and may still do so if conditions warrant.
Exactly upside down it is. N2O is not free, and I'm a cheapskate.
Kevin OClassen

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You can get electric blankets specifically designed to heat nitrous tanks for car usage. But they seem to like to run their systems closer to 900 PSI, I've heard. And people have commented on the Yahoo Hybrids group (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/hybridrocketmotors /) that heaters use too much electrical power.
Other people seem to leave their tank in a warm car and only haul it out for their launch and then put the tank back in the car while they recycle for the next flight.
Frozen lake, eh? Are people ice-fishing out there too? If they heat their huts you might be able to put the tank in there in between launches.
Remember that Nitrous is a powerful anesthetic! Be very careful in enclosed spaces (like cars and ice-fishing huts)! Yes, there is a "scent" added to most, but you need to be careful...     Will
Kevin OClassen wrote:

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