virtual beginner

As one with literally no rocketry background and I mean zero, what's the
best way to get started. Looks like just a simple model rocket pre-assembled
or not?
Bob Schneider
Reply to
Bob Schneider
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I would look at getting a Beginner kit. It will come with everything that you need to launch a rocket. I started with a starter kit that came with 2 rockets to put together. Then you can start getting kits to put to gether there is alot of great vendors around. I would also sugest to go to The Rocketry Forum
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and ask the same questions you will get some great answers there also as here.
-- Tom Priest Rockethead Rockets snipped-for-privacy@rap.midco.net
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pre-assembled
Reply to
rocket trike
I would bu yan Estes starter set, a spare rocket and 3-4 packs of spare motors for the rockets. Start with lower power to practice. Nothing wrong with an A or a B. Available locally.
Then get a USR or LOC kit which uses very similar methods but with bigger parts. USR kits fly great on Estes D motors. LOC kits fly best on bigger composites. Available on the internet.
Jerry
This should be in the FAQ.
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
You can do that......some RTF rockets are out there.......but building a low power rocket with elmer's glue and being forced to follow the directions will set you in the proper direction. If you didn't build it and it fail you will never learn. Regardless of wheter it's 12 inches or 12 feet, everyone learns something when they build their own. A lot of the steps to moving on in rocketry start with the small stuff. If you learn how to filet your fins, sand you motormounts to fit, properly attach the shock cord, and simply follow the directions you will be far better off. Learn and fly, learn more and fly higher. It's an endless cycle as I don't know anyone who knows it all
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this is a great guy with some greater kits to start off with.....enjoy the ride!
Reply to
Chuck Rudy
Buy an $18 kit from walmart which includes the estes launcher, a rocket, and a couple of motors. Buy a few more A8-3 or B6-5 motors while you're there. After you launch (or loose) that rocket, go to the nearest hobby store and pick out something a little bigger which requires you to actually build it. The estes phoenix or quest icarus or superbird would be good easy to find choices. The phoenix being the coolest but most expensive of the three.
Tom
Reply to
nam
From my experience the ones with the Quest launchers are much easier to handle and simpler to use, hold, store than the Estes stuff.........if you wanna get into boost gliders go to
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research their stuff a bit....they have some great gliders and parts for the wayward rocket or should you choose to build from scratch
Reply to
Chuck Rudy
I'd get one of the Quest starter kits that do NOT have the rocket pre-assembled. Building is part of the fun. nd look for the pistol grip 9v launch controller, instead of the one that used 4 AA batteries. I've really been impressed with that controller.
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD" >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD!
Reply to
Bob Kaplow
a 'starter set' will get you off and running. It comes complete with a "Ready-to-fly" rocket, and a launch pad and electronic ignition. You will also want some motors.
My kids and I launched at a large school yard, virtually empty on weekends once the weather is brisk. You will just want to make sure the wind is low. Of course I'll recommend that you involve yourself with a local club for alot of reasons, including the brains to pick - and a spectators to appreciate your flights! But there is something about launching your (or your kids) first rocket from your own launch pad, with you pressing the button, that is priceless! I still have the videos of my kids first launch.
Quest makes a product that is superior to the Estes ones, both in quality of materials and craftsmanship.
You can buy buy these at Rocket Warehouse (and other hobby rocketry retailers):
Quest starter sets and rocket kits
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Quest motors
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I would also recommend buying these excellent books and the CD available from Apogee Rocketry. I have them all, and found the movies on the CD-ROM to be both interesting and instructive for my three young rocketeers (ages 9 to 13).
Building Skill Level 1 Model Rocket Kits (CD-ROM, $13)
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"Model Rocket Design and Construction", by Tim Van Milligan (Book, $24)
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"Second Stage: Advanced Model Rocketry - 2nd. Edition", by Michael Banks (Book, $16)
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when you are ready to move on to kit building, please consider the following vendors of quality model rocket kits (in alphabetical order)
Aerospace Speciality Products
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Apogee
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Balsa Machining Service
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FlisKits
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Pratt Hobbies
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Qualified Competition Rockets
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The Launch Pad
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U.S. Rockets
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- iz
Bob Schneider wrote:
way to get started. Looks like just a simple model rocket pre-assembled or not?
Reply to
Ismaeel Abdur-Rasheed
First Choice: Find a local club. Attend one of their launches or club meetings. Get advice from them. Somebody in the club is likely to have a beginner's launcher that they have outgrown, that you can borrow or get for (practically) nothing.
Second Choice: Get a Quest starter set. Comes with a pre-assembled rocket, 3 engines, igniters, wadding, a decent launch pad, and a really nice 9-volt launch controller (much better than the Estes 6-volt controllers). You can pick up a set like this for $20 at Hobby Lobby ($10 when they run their half-price coupons every few months). At the same time, pick up a nice Skill Level 1 or 2 kit that you must assemble and a package of B6-4 engines. Then move on to kits from one of the many fine vendors already listed by Ismaeel. ( I would also add Art Applewhite
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to the vendor list when you're ready to move on to more unique rockets -- flying saucers are his specialty).
Third Choice: Same as second choice, except with an Estes starter set.
A really great place to find out more about the kits available is Essence's Model Rocket Reviews
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Nick has over 1400 kit reviews, along with a lot of helpful hints for building each kit.
-- Bob Cox ===============================================================
"Bob Schneider" wrote:
Reply to
Bob Cox
Get Stine's "Handbook of Model Rocketry".
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Reply to
Darren J Longhorn
Both Quest and extes still make starter kits where the rocket is not "ready to fail", i.e. you have to build it. I recommend this route.
Look for the 40-50% off one item coupons from Michaels, or the 1/2 off sale from Hobby Lobby to pick up a starter set. Or you will sometimes find them cheap at KB Toys.
Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L TRA # "Impeach the TRA BoD" >>> To reply, remove the TRABoD!
Reply to
Bob Kaplow
pre-assembled
Go to Wal-Mart and get a rocket. Twenty minutes later... Whoosh!
Actually, it depends on your goal... your interests.
Do you just want to watch your rocket up? Interested in developing the craftsmanship skills required to create a thing of beauty? Interested in testing the Physics? Do you want to shoot for a record of some kind, altitude, egg-lofting, duration? Scale Models? Solid Motor design? Recovery systems? Camera Payload or some other esoteric electronics?
As with any undertaking... choose a goal or desire first, make an outline... stick with the plan.
Read. Research. Plan. Save. Then... Read. Research. and Plan again.
You have internet access... a wonderful tool!
Reply to
Mark
Believe it or not Bob, not everyone is fixated on the lowest possible price. Most people are quite happy paying a "lower market price" at Wal-Mart, TRU, or any local hobby store. It's only $20-30.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
If at all possible, I would recommend finding a club in your area and attending a launch. Walk around, introduce yourself to people and ask questions. Because once you get into rocketry, these are the people you will probably end up launching with anyway. May as well start with them.
Reply to
Kurt Kesler

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