Building model of Cooper River Bridge

I am currantly trying to build a model of the cooper river bridge. At
the moment I am working on the piers that hold up the fixed part of the
bridge. They have a base with a colum on each side than a top were the
road deck is atached. I am constructing it all from evergreen styrene.
On the base I have simply found center of colum and drilled a hole to
fit that piece. The problem I am having is keeping everything straight.
The colums are perfectly centered and are paralel, but one will be
kicked to the side and the other not. Does anyone know of a way to do
this were the colums will be level and plumb. It has to look perfect!
The bases and tops are hollow, top bottom and sides, glued with super
glue. Would it work better if top and bottom were solid styrene. If so
I no doubt woud have to have a perfectly drilled hole or it would end
up worse.
Any Ideas
Reply to
crotalus
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I'm not familiar with the bridge thus I can't get a handle on what you're looking for.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
crotalus, I put "cooper river bridge" in google search and came up with this one. Is this the one you're talking about?
formatting link
Mike G.
Reply to
Mike G.
lol where the hell is the cooper river bridge...............is it a significant architectural structure......does it have any historical significance....and why are u building it ........ Arc
Reply to
Arcusinoz
Cliick on the link above you that Mike G. sent. Historicaly. just opened. Im building it just to build it. That is kind of a stupid question to ask on a model builing forum. Why do people build model cars, plane and tanks?To build something from scratch is a real challange and anyone who does not like this bridge pretty much does not have a pulse.
Reply to
crotalus
Can you reinforce the base/column joints with something such as A&B Putty (or similar two-part clay-like epoxy putty)? If your base is hollow, you should be able to keep the putty "invisible", and it will definitely reinforce the joints, while also giving you time to "scooch" them around, to get the alignment the way you want it. Plus, it will keep you from having to drill "perfect" holes.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
You might want to post the question over on rec.models.railroad. Model Railroaders build a good number of bridges. My suggestion would be to attach the columns to the bridge deck and then attach everyting to the base. That way every thing can folat from the deck and you can shim to the base and cover the shims with scenery. It's the exact opposite of the way you would build the protoype, but it works for models.
Claude Allen
Reply to
Claude H. Allen
I just did. Wow! I'm quite sure my little bit of knowledge about bridges isn't of any help here.
It's breathtaking but I don't think I'd feel comfortable driving across it. I believe my pulse would make its presence too obvious. :]
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
Hey Greg that is a good idea. I will try this, maybe instead of ripping the bottom off to fill i could drill two holes and inject it. I was even thinking of casting the parts.
Reply to
crotalus
Hey Bill, I drove on it opening day. We tried to go across at 3 pm but traffic did not die down till 11pm. I can till you I was slightly disapointed because most bridges I cross will make me just slightly rushed from the anxiety of being that high up over water, on this bridge no rush. It is so wide, 8 lanes and the 4% grade is so slight that you dont even feel like you are on a bridge. Quite a bridge!
Reply to
crotalus
You will probably have to drill holes, big enough for your fingers. You will need to be able to poke around in there, to squish the putty where you need it, and squish it back into place, one you get the columns aligned.
Reply to
Greg Heilers

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