Dumb Modeling Question# 132

this involves acrylic paint & arisol spray,is this made as a
product?,I really dont want get out the airbrush & buy a bottle of
primer if i dont have to.
Reply to
teem
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To prime or not to prime, that is the question. Why primer a model, good question. You would primer so the base color paint will have something to grab on to - so to speak. In the case of acrylics or with any other paint, if you do not primer, you run the risk of having the color of the plastic bleed thru on sharp edges because the base color paint did not build up as it would on a flat surface. So there it is.
Ray Austin, Texas ===
teem wrote:
Reply to
Ray S. & Nayda Katzaman
Is your question, does acrylic spray exist? Yes.
Primer. It is always a good idea; as it gives the succeeding color coats something to grab ahold of. It provides "tooth", which is far better than the bare plastic/resin/metal. If your model is something that will not suffer a lot of handling (being permanently affixed to a base, for example); and it is not going to require many succeeding color coats (and the needed masking); then you can probably get away with *not* priming. But, when done carefully, priming offers so many advantages.
Many people "prime" using thinned down "Mr. Surfacer". (thins with cheap old isopropyl alcohol). "Mr. Surfacer" provides an excellent "tooth", fills minor seams and imperfections, and shrinks as it dries, so that fine details stand little chance of being obliterated.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
I have been painting with Acrylics, all sorts of model types,and I have never used a primer.I was always concerned about the "obliteration"of those fine details that make a model come to life when been fine detailed and dry brushed.I do also wash all the parts in warm soapy water before assembling.
Reply to
Arcusinoz
That definitely helps...but when your have sweaty hands, and are a "fumble-fingers" such as I...such paints tend to erode away just in limited handling...lol.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Thanks guys for straightening me out,I have 2 vinyl models & the directions on the one model stated stay away from enamels,I thought they meant enamel primer,it would screw up the properties of the vinyl.I was told by a hobby store i can use enamel primer,i'll just spray lightly to get the ''tooth''.>Arcus>
Reply to
teem
Do you know what percentage of Mr. Surfacer to Alcohol to use? Just ordered some and want to give it a shot.
Reply to
Jim
Probably more alcohol, ratio-wise, than you would normally use for paint... as just about every bottle of Mr Surfacer I have had, was quite a bit thicker than Gunze paint. And this thickness seems to vary quite a bit. So.....just play "Old Professor Glockenspiel" and experiment...lol.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Isopropyl is not the best thinner for Mr. S. If you aren't careful you will get some nasty looking stuff that won't prime worth a hoot. For better results, try some Mr. Color Thinner or, barring that, some lacquer thinner.
And don't think Mr. S 1000 needs a lot of thinning. I would start with a third thinner and see what happens. It really depends on how old the Mr. S is to start with and how thick it has become. But it's about the best easy primer out there and is an excellent base for Alclad or other lacquer-like paints.
MB
Reply to
Milton Bell

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