Extremely OT Question: Home Generators

we had a power outage last night and a generator would have been nice. anyone got one who can explain if they are worth it? how does it basically work?

Are they run by gasoline and you can run an extension cord/power strip into the house to keep appliances (or air brushes as the case may be) going?

Is it as simple as that?

thx - Craig

Reply to
crw59
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google is your friend. they come in many shapes, sizes and fuels. cost is variable too. usefulness depends on how often you lose power.

Reply to
e

Some are. Personally if I were to get a generator I'd buy one that runs off my home's natural gas supply.

Reply to
Al Superczynski

We had a two week outage after Hurricane Wilma, and several homes on our block had gasoline generators (which were as rare as hen's teeth at the Home Depot and Lowes stores--they basically sold out every shipment before it even arrived). The neighborhood sounded like a bus depot with all those motors idling. Basically, yes, you roll your portable generator out into the yard start it up and run one or more heavy duty extension cords back into the house. A gallon of gas will usually get you 10 hours or so of power. The oil needs to be changed every 12 hours or so. Of course, every hurricane season we have at least one tragedy when somebody who doesn't read the manual tries to run one indoors or in the garage and wipes out his whole family with carbon monoxide fumes (this year there were two). Best bet is to get a carbon monoxide detector at the same time you buy the generator--looks like a smoke detector, costs about the same. As for capacity, the itty bitty ones are really just for running a few power tools out at a job site. Make sure you get one that can handle at least the refrigerator, a lamp or two and the TV. These will also have 220 outlets as well as 110 on the outside, so you can run the washer or dryer from time to time. The big natural gas powered ones are ideal, of course, but they start at 4 grand before installation. Gerald Owens

Reply to
Gerald Owens

good synopsis except the diesels are best. add a biofuel kit and you're set for fuel. fyi, biofuel is used vegetable oil diesel. basically filter, change ph with lye and burn. smells good too.

Reply to
e

Does it smell anything like cotton-seed oil? I remember growing up in Alabama, and passing through the rural farmland areas. That scent was incredible (in a very good way).

Reply to
Greg Heilers

used veggie oil smells like french frys. many resturants give it away. usually they pay to have it hauled away.

Reply to
e

fuck gasoline, go bio diesel. store as long as wanted. lots cheaper!

Reply to
e

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