Gluing etched parts

Any suggestions on best way to attach small etched parts without excess glue around the sides? Something like a glue stick that will adhere well but
still leave time for final positioning?
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Tom Spence
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Tom Spence wrote:

Tom, Depending on the finish of the model, you can use clear, semi-gloss, or flat clear paint. Just a small dab with a toothpick or other applicator on the back of the PE part. The clear paint will give you ample time to position the PE part where you want it.
Good luck,
Ray Austin, TX =
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I use Future instead of clear "paint" and it works the same way. Just be careful to not use it for things that get knocked around. For those things I prefer dilute white glue which I can clean up with a damp brush.
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Tom Spence wrote:

I use thick CA glues, and sometimes watch crystal cement. Watch crystal cement provides a fairly long working time.
The trick is what you use to apply the glue. One of my favorites for applying CA is a needle - I use the pointy end, but some like ot use the eye (sometimes with the end broken off to form a fork) because it holds more glue that way. In any event, it allows you to put the glue where you want it.
I also use another needle in a pin vise for positioning the part.
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- Rufus

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Tom Spence wrote:

Using "quick-set" glues like CA is definitely an ordeal, particularly for those (like me) who cannot, if our lives depended on it, place the part exactly where it needs to be, the first time (or second...or third...). Ray's suggestion of using "clear" is excellent, for parts that will not be under any stress. For others, you might try 5-minute epoxy-type glues. Sure, they can be a mess, and you will mix up way more than you will use, but they *do* give you good working time.
I have also had success (regarding the aforementioned parts that won't be under stress) with using plain old liquid cement. Rough up the gluing surface of the metal part, to give it some tooth. Brush some cement on the plastic area, and "squish" the metal part down. Admittedly, this works better with larger metal parts, with more gluing-surface area. It even works with more petite parts, such as lift-rings, etc., if you are going to add a weld seam around the part afterwards (a perfect use for a small worm of 2-part epoxy putty, which will also add some strength).
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Greg Heilers
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Tom Spence wrote:

Many of the gel (thick) CAs are slower setting than the normal stuff, yet hold really well. I use the gel stuff either when the fit is not perfect OR when I want some extra positioning time. I keep accelerator around so that after it is positioned properly I can give it a squirt of accelerator so it will stiffen up and I don't have to hold the part.
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I am sticking door hinges on a DC Kits 128 ABS plastic and super glue to hold them on. Seems to work well
Got some etched sides for another vehicle - these I will solder bits on
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