scapa flow

have there been any recent surveys or explorations of the wrecks there? aren't there still some high seas fleet ships? seems like a ripe area for a documentary.

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e wrote:

Since Scapa was(is?) an active naval base I'd wager that most if not all wrecks have been removed. Navigation hazards aren't appreciated in busy ports.
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i remembered reading there were high seas wreck's there in ww2 and wonder about now.
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A few years ago the Royal Oak was still there in the northern part - She's in the charts by our navigator almost managed to catch her with the anchor!!!
--


Claus Gustafsen
Strandby Denmark
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IIRC, most of the German stuff was salved in the 20s (?). I'll go to the local library tomorrow and borrow the book I read about it. b If CRAFT disease don't set in first...
RobG

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About a dozen warships still lie in Scapa Flow, the list below is taken from www.scapaflow.co.uk.
There have been many documentaries about the scuttling and wrecks, at least on Scottish TV channels. HMS Royal Oak also lies in the Flow, and leaking engine oil is an ongoing problem which has required the navy to take remedial action on her to seel her hull. Stories about this appear on the Scottish news quite often.
John
The German wrecks are :
German Naval Wrecks. The remaining German Wrecks from the First World War are closely grouped near the island of Cava, lying between the Mainland and Hoy.
1. Knig. Lies almost upside-down, in 34-37 metres of water. Most damaged of the German Wrecks. The hull is opened along much of its length, exposing the vessel's tangled innards. Divers may pass under the wreck to view the central turret. Knig was the flagship of the Third Squadron of the High Seas Fleet, and the name ship of its class of Dreadnoughts.
2. Kronprinz Wilhelm. Settled upside-down in 38 metres of water. Many sections of the ship's hull have been removed. The foghorn is visible underneath, perfectly perserved, and the ship can be entered to view the galley. A Knig-class Dreadnought, originally called simply Kronprinz. It was launched on February 21st, 1914, and joined the Third Squadron of the High Seas Fleet in January 1915. Arrived in Scapa Flow November 27th 1918.
3. Markgraf. Settled at a depth of 24 metres. Though originally lying on its starboard side, the ship's weight has caused it to turn hull-uppermost. Open hull sections allow a view of the torpedo room, and the diver may swim right through the ship's stern. A Knig-class Dreadnought. Launched at Bremen on June 4th 1913, and joined the fleet in June 1914.
4. Brummer. Lies on its starboard side in 34 metres of water. Divers can enter the upper and middle decks, to view crew accomodation. The bridge, the remains of the boiler room, and officers' accomodation are also accessible. A light cruiser, incorporating propulsion systems originally intended for a Russian Battleship (War broke out before Germany completed its construction). Owing to its graceful bow, Brummer was capable of masquerading as a British cruiser. It joined the fleet in Autumn 1916. It was intended to act as a lone raiding craft, but this proved impractical. It entered Scapa Flow on November 27th 1918.
5. Karlsruhe. Lies on its starboard side in 24-27 metres of water. Visibility is the best of the German Wrecks. Much of the ship has been damaged by salvage operations, but the remaining parts still contain many interesting features. There is an opening in the platform deck, which allows access to an electrical control room. Cruiser of the Knigsberg II-class. Joined the fleet on November 15th 1916, as a replacement for the 17-year-old cruiser Niobe.
6. Kln II. Settled on its starboard side in 34 metres of water. It is possible to enter the ship through a hole in the forecastle deck, and to examine the conning-tower. Dresden II-class cruiser. The class was an advancement on the Konigsberg II-class, and the last class of light cruisers to be built during the war.
7. Dresden II. Settled in 33-36 metres of water, lying on its starboard side, Dresden is almost intact. It is possible to enter the Commanding Officer's quarters, and there are many opportunities to view features on the outside of the wreck. Name ship of its class. This and Koln II were the only two ships of their class to be completed during the war.
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coolness, i knew something was left. i will have to search for documentaries. i'm sure someone is selling them. dresden 2 i read about long ago,
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e> coolness, i knew something was left. i will have to search for e> documentaries. i'm sure someone is selling them. dresden 2 i e> read about long ago,
There are also several torpedo boats of the V classes, and some submarines. Plus British harbor patrol craft wrecks and I think one submarine that is a war wreck, apart from the Roayal Oak.
--
G Hassenpflug /* IJN & JMSDF */

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so it's as big a junk pile a pearl?
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I thought it was called SCAPA FLOE ??
Ken
John Walker wrote:

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Many of these ships have been, and continue to be, 'mined' for the steel they are made from - as it was made before the atmosphere became contaminated with the results of nuclear explosions, the metal is highly sought after for scientific instruments (Modern steel being contaminated by the particles in the air used during manufacture)
IIRC, some of it went into spave with NASA.
Regarding this and War Graves, certain less scrupulous Far Eastern metals dealers have been casting envious eyes in the direction of Renown (or was it Repluse?) and the Prince of Wales - apparently one of the latter's brass propellers has already disappeared.
Don't reply to the btconnect address - and remove nospam!!
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Wouldn't this "old" steel become just as "contaminated" when they melt it down to make something else? And I guess that means we are all contaminated forever?Now I wish I had bought that undersea condo when I had the chance...
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The largest source on non irradiated steel in the entire world
Simmilar when they raised the CSS Hunley, the crews remains were immedately tested, for the same reason as above..... (as well as the hull plating) BTW that is another good story, google it, and ya all will be impressed !
"Only a Gentleman can insult me, and a true Gentleman never will..."
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e wrote:

Or a repeat!
In a documentary made some decades ago, where two men from both sides of the battle get taken out, wreaths in hand, ina small boat and get taken out to the site of the Royal Oak. One of them told of how the captain was one of the 'old guard' and stood to attention at his quarters as the ship was sinking. Seeing his men jumping ship he shouted for them to come back. "F*ck off!" was this old boy's retort.
They're war graves of course so it is with only the most special permission that a dive can be made.
Richard.
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Go to this site - good article on the raising of many of the High Seas Fleet
http://www.bobhenneman.info/photogalleryhome.htm
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yes!. thank you
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Great site!
Lots of great period photos.
Tom
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the
to
permission
That's what I thought; like the USS Arizona, HMS Ark Royal is a war grave and must be left where it lays. The Arizona also leaks from its fuel bunkers and they are attended too. Just how many men went down with the Ark Royal? Mike IPMS

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of
bunkers
The Royal Oak is a war grave, the German wrecks aren't. I don't think anyone went down with the Ark Royal, but since she's in about 3500 feet of water it's unlikely she will be interfered with either way.
John
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