Seams

Now that folks have got me looking over my links, you can get Mr. Surfacer from Roll Models, if you'd like to try some -
<http://www.rollmodels.net/standard/show_detail.php?hileveldesc=Finishing+Supplies&manufacturer=Gunze-Sangyo
I used to buy a lot of stuff from Roll Models - lots of the unusual and hard to find stuff I like to use. They're a good source.
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- Rufus

Tom wrote:
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: How about the Squadron White, Bruce? That supposedly claims to be a little : smoother/finer. I don't see much difference and have stuck with the Green : just cause its a little easier to see when applied in the seam or divot. :     As others have noted, Squadron White isn't much better, or perhaps worse.
    I didn't like how "grainy" the White was - almost like it was already dried out?
    Tamiya Putty I like, as well as another Tamiya product - Light Curing Putty. It is a carmel colored putty, and cures when exposed to UV light (sunlight, flourescent, or special UV bulbs). What I like about Light Curing Putty is you can apply it in indirect light (think north side of house in the morning), and work to get it where you want it, clean it up, then expose it do direct light or flourescent light to set it.
    Of course, you can only get it from Japan, as Tamiya America doesn't import it.
                            Bruce
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"I like bad!" Bruce Burden Austin, TX.
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snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com (Bruce Burden) wrote in

Will a Halogen lamp work?
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: snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com (Bruce Burden) wrote in : :> then expose it do direct light or flourescent light to set it. :> : Will a Halogen lamp work? :     It should - according to Wikipedia, a halogen lamp is just another incadescent lamp, and produces light from the most of the spectrum.
                            Bruce
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"I like bad!" Bruce Burden Austin, TX.
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Bruce Burden wrote:

Evidently you can get it here in the States from these guys in Arkansas:
<http://www.1001modelkits.com/model-supplies/52052-photo-sensitive-putty-34grs-tamiya-87076.html?gclid=CMiitZCEybQCFUZgMgodVF4AHw
...but they don't sell it cheap. Hobbylink Japan will sell it to you for about half that:
http://www.hlj.com/product/TAM87076
And now you've got me curious! This sounds like good stuff. And there are probably other light curing resins/epoxies out there that one could use as well.
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- Rufus

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I use Tamiya putty. Grey and white, doesn't seem to be much difference. I mixed some with liquid cement (Tamiya and Testors) and keep it in a bottle. Goes on nice, sands out well.
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ftauss wrote:

Second.
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I should note that I seem to have better luck just putting a dab down and smoothing it with a putty tool. It takes a little practice to get it right.
Milliput is good because it is a water base and doesn't attack the plastic. It seems to work easily but when it hardens it HARDENS.
I am going to try an experiment with some Airfix kits with seams where I'm going to use the Milliput and then wipe the seam down repeatedly to remove all the Milliput from the surronding platic with wet paper towels.
Everything else is oil based and will attack the plastic no matter what you do so sanding smooth afterward is a must meaning detail is in danger.
The one time I used Milliput so far, I used it to build up what I thought was a shape that was to flat, it was very hard to file it down once hard.
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: : :> ftauss wrote: :>> I use Tamiya putty. Grey and white, doesn't seem to be much difference. : : I should note that I seem to have better luck just putting a dab down and : smoothing it with a putty tool. It takes a little practice to get it right. :     Have you tried Tamiya Light Cure Putty? This putty cures with exposure to UV light, rather than volitales. I generally work it in the north/west side of the house in the morning, so I avoid direct sunlight and flourescent or halogen lights. You can use water to shape the putty before just leaving it out to cure. : : Milliput is good because it is a water base and doesn't attack the plastic. : It seems to work easily but when it hardens it HARDENS. :     I don't care for Milliput. It doesn't seem to make the trip across the pond well, plus it does seem to go hard just from storage. : : I am going to try an experiment with some Airfix kits with seams where I'm : going to use the Milliput and then wipe the seam down repeatedly to remove : all the Milliput from the surronding platic with wet paper towels. :     I like Mr. Surfacer 500 - it it is old enough, it gets thicker sitting in the bottle (mine are still the old blue towers, not the current wide lid). I build it up in layers, with plenty of cure time in between applications. I don't find it shrinks if given sufficient time between applictions. : : Everything else is oil based and will attack the plastic no matter what you : do so sanding smooth afterward is a must meaning detail is in danger. :     Nice thing about Mr. Surfacer is you can use 90% rubbing alcohol on a cotton bud to remove the cured putty, sparing the detail. Also, I like to use the two X-Acto flat blades (#17 & #18) to remove filler from flat or convex surfaces. Concave surfaces are a no-no, as the corners will dig in. : : The one time I used Milliput so far, I used it to build up what I thought : was a shape that was to flat, it was very hard to file it down once hard. :     And it doesn't shrink, which is any two-part putty charm.
                            Bruce
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snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com (Bruce Burden) wrote in

Haven't seen the Light Cure yet. Most of the Milliput I've seen has worked well, it is a PITA to prep it.
I have Mr Surfacer 1000, store nearby carries it. Still getting a feel for it. Nice to know about the alcohol. I'll hasve to try that next.
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: snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com (Bruce Burden) wrote in : : Haven't seen the Light Cure yet. :     You'll most like have to go to HLJ for the Light Cure Putty. Tamiya America dosen't seem to know/care about it. : : Most of the Milliput I've seen has worked : well, it is a PITA to prep it. :     Out of curiosity, what do you do to prep it? : : I have Mr Surfacer 1000, store nearby carries it. Still getting a feel for : it. Nice to know about the alcohol. I'll hasve to try that next. :     I find 1000 too thin for most of what I do, however, I do have some smeared on the roof of a paper-napkin project I'm working on, were I cut off the cupola. 1000 is also good to use on those fine holes that just don't seem to get filled no matter what you do to them (and, using a fairly sharp wooden toothpick to open them up does help).
    The 500 is what I turn to for most filling jobs. It has been hard to get lately. Probably California "knowing" that it is bad for something somewhere...
                            Bruce
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"I like bad!" Bruce Burden Austin, TX.
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snipped-for-privacy@austin.rr.com (Bruce Burden) wrote in (Bruce Burden) wrote in

Stopped in at Piper hobby on the way home yesterday, none in stock for a while. 8(
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If you can't find Mr Surfacer, try White Out. It's about the same thickness, sands roughly the same and costs way less : )
J
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White out, huh? I'll have try that. Off to Office depot I go...
T2
"Jessica" wrote in message

If you can't find Mr Surfacer, try White Out. It's about the same thickness, sands roughly the same and costs way less : )
J
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Tom wrote the following on 12/28/2012 11:38 PM (ET):

Testors also makes what they call 'Contour Putty'. It is also white and seems to dry faster than Squadron Green Putty.

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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