Some common sense...

Ok, I know you all think I might be looney of all this. But I like to say my
feelings about what everyone wants and I know the people here on
rec.models.scale.
First of all, I know I had a problem with WEM and I also had problems with
HLJ. Yea, maybe I had a CC or debit card problem in which I cannot control.
But I did find out once that VISA will not do it because some countries are
at "high risk". So that is out of the bag.
Now, here is my opinion. I like to say that Aeromaster came out with some
fine paint for the Japanese aircraft. Now there is none here in the USA,
then all I can say is all is lost. Why cannot Testors, Floquil, and all
other American companies come out with it? Can somebody use a little bit of
education and alot of common sense how you have to have something to use to
make a decent model? I know some of our U.S. companies has come out with
paints (best of all, German, Russia, Italian, France, and best of all, U.S.)
but there are some paints out there that some of you know about that are not
there.
But we as modelers done alot of research and findings how the real ones were
done. So why cannot we get things that some educated idiot cannot realize
the importance of what we all do?
I say this. As a fellow modeler, why don't we come out of the blue and ask
our U.S. comrades that makes these paints to start making them here? Since
some are outside the U.S., why cannot we get them here? I do not give a darn
if its acrylic or enamels.
With Respect,
William L. Powell
Modeler
Reply to
William L. Powell
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William Powell proposed:
You have to convince the CPA/MBA/HMFIC to go along with your idea. The life cycle of a majority of the products out there is so short that you have to get in, make a profit and move on to the next money maker. As a wild guess I think the life/profit cycle has gone from about two years in the early 70's to only a couple of months in today's market. The people that you are talking about don't share formulas, therfore development costs are too high for a market that has already been "invaded". Reinventing the wheel is usually not very profitable.
Rick Clark
Reply to
OXMORON1
This is likely a problem specific to the issuers of your card. At HLJ, I've had no problems using a Citibank mastercard and a Fleet (Boston area bank) Visa card.
Reply to
John McGrail
The solution is simple:
Mix your *own* colors. Aeromaster doesn't *make* paint. Like many "model paint" companies, they find a paint formula that someone *else* makes, and remixes and it, and rebottles it.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Any tips or suggestions to start mixing your own? Like which basic colors to start with, obvious combinations etc?
Am interested but I am unsure on how to start.
Reply to
a0002604
Ya know, if you look around
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they've got some paint formulas hth
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper
there's a good rlm chart on one of the site's. it prints out very nicely.
Reply to
e
Yea, I agree on some of you. But I just don't understand why can some of our U.S. companies could not make these kind of paint?
A/J Red Brown Primer AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1089 Japan WW2 Earth Brown AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1092 Japan WW2 Nakajima Army Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1090 Japan WW2 Nakajima Navy Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1091 Japan WW2 Nakajima Navy Grey AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1093 Nakajima Interior Grey/Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1098 Undersurface Army Grey/Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1097 WW2 Kawasaki Army Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1096 WW2 Mitsubishi Interior Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1094 WW2 Mitsubishi Navy Green AeroMaster Warbird Acrylic Colors AN1095 WW2 Mitsubishi Navy Grey
Besides Aeromaster, why could they not make these? It takes common sense for the U.S. companies to make them with out all of the uptite budgets and alot of work.
But you will get my meaning....
William
Reply to
William L. Powell
It is all basically "trial and error", but once you start tinkering; you can pick it up pretty quickly. The best thing to remember, when starting, is to use pure, primary colors. If you start with a drab, WWII-ish color, when mixing, the amount of gray contained within your mixing colors, will more likely lead you to a muddy, gray mess; at the end.
Be creative. Some common colors, can be made from unexpected sources. A classic case is the OD on U.S. vehicles in WWII. As Mr. Zaloga and others have often pointed out; it was simply a mixture of yellow and black.
Look for figure painting "how to" articles, especially those in which oils were used. They will often give detailed paint mix formulas. Being that they are using common oils; you can easily get a visual image, in your mind, of what colors to use; and can probably transfer that to enamels and/or acrylics.
A good magazine for this, is Ron Souza and Steve Weakley's "Historical Miniature" magazine.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
they must convinve the bean counters there is profit. some of your colors might be considered obscure.
Reply to
e
A *VERY* cheap way to learn color mixing. Pick up a few bottles of Apple Barrel acrylic paints and mix without worry. At less than a dollar a bottle they make for a viable testing medium. Heck once you get used to mixing, shoot them through an airbrush. Use distilled water to thin.
Reply to
MANDO VILLARREAL
Well, it seems that no one cares about it.
All I can say is that the old Aeromaster did some good paints on the Japanese colors that made sense. I used the Nakajima Interior Green for my Kates and they looked wonderful and the Mitsubish Interior Green and they looked nice.
But I think it is really not fair that Testors, Floquil, or any U.S. product will not make these special paints. Because look at Testors for instance, they have a nice set of RLM colors. But they only have a small portion of Japanese colors only the Navy Green and Gray, Army Green and Gray and the Interior metal Blue Green (Aotake). Put some more of the Jap colors to it. Hell with the mixing, lets convince the companies to do so.
It is not BTW that I am fussing about I could not get the WEM paints. Lets get some here in the U.S.
Start making more paints to sastify us not for myself.
With Humble Regards, William
Reply to
William L. Powell
I've got to agree with you in one regard. Japanese colours get little time or respect from the paint companies. It could be a matter of difficulty of research or it could be the generally low sales here of anything Japanese except the Zero. For my part I have rounded up what colours are available from Model Master and a few Aeromaster enamels that Squadron still had when the discontinuation announcement came out. I also am annoyed at Humbrol for dropping colours continuously. They seem to be trying to push everybody into mixing their own in the hopes of making more money off the hobbyists.
Bill Banaszak, MFE
Reply to
Mad-Modeller
William, you might want to look here:
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Aeromaster had to drop their line of colors when RPM bought Floquil if I remember correctly. As you can see from the site they're marketing paint again but the Japanese line is MIA. You might want to send them a letter and ask if they're going to market them again. If their response is that sales were poor than we'll have to import. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap!)
Reply to
Keeper

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