Tamiya Streetlamp Glass Cover.

Tamiya had a Roadside Sign Set (35067) which contains two street lamps. It had bugged me that it came without the bowl glass cover. I
tried making my own (vacuuming forming, grinding down plexiglas rod, the dollar store toys) all without success. Then I spotted these large sized LEDs (NTE 30067, NTE Electronics Inc. of NJ.) that seemed the right size and shape. Sure enough. By grinding down the collar the LED fitted right into the top helmet of the lamp. This being a LED how could I resist making a working street lamp as well. The project is extract single wire strands from multi-strand wiring. They are as thin as your hair. Use six inch strands as they are easier to handle. Solder a single strand as near to the base of each LED lead as possible and snip off the rest of the leads. Use latex caulking (or silicone?, whatever is available) to secure the LED to the street lamp top. Set overnight. Drill small entry holes into the top of the base portion of the street lamp. Thread each wire into the inside of this base. I used Sludge (an acrylic paste http://www.tri-art.ca/en/products/sludge /) to hold the exposed length of each strand to the lamp. Dry overnight. When painted over the wire strands are practically invisible. Light up the LED and its fantastic!
To power the LED use only button battery cells. It requires three button cells in series to power a LED. Don't use AA cells as they will fry the LED. Do not try to solder a wire onto the button cell. The heat will make the cell explode and it happened to me. I must have butchered countless dollar store LED lamps to find a battery holder I could adapt to power the Tamiya street lamp. My eventual solution is to use the blister pack cup for each cell to make a sandwich assembly. The middle cell is secured within a hole cut into foam board. On each side of this foam board is a blister pack cup to hold the first and the third cell to make a sandwich with the middle cell. Use your ingenuity to make the wiring contacts. Then tape the sandwich assembly. You have a LED battery source.
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From one of my model railroad blogs: Walgreen's, in their Christmas display section, has a 50-light string of WARM WHITE LED's for sale at $5.00. That's 10 cents each, if you use them that way. They are a low rise dome shaped style. 12.2 feet of lighted length. Total wattage 4.8 watts. Good for lighting structures and layouts. Keevan
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